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Does this make sense to anyone out here?

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by MsLEE2121 MsLEE2121 (New Member) New Member

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Hey all I am in a BSN program in AL. I know everyone else on here is saying how hard it is to get into a BSN program around the country, but here in AL, it's really not that hard. Anyways, I am in a BSN program as I stated, but I have just recently had to withdraw from one of my classes, which in turn has pushed my graduation date back. I had to withdraw from my Math Calculations class in Fall of 08 because I had to come back home to help my family. My graduation date was set to Fall 2010 originally, then when I withdrew from my calculations class, my graduation date was set to Spring 2011, now it's set at Fall 2011. I have turned a 2 year program to a 3 year program. I was thinking of just going the Lpn route and then bridging over to RN. I will start working faster, and gain experience a lot faster than if I stayed in this BSN program. Do you all think this is a logical plan? Has anyone been in this situation before?

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amymina specializes in telemetry.

59 Posts; 1,866 Profile Views

If you received your LPN, would you need to go out and work after school? I know being in the workplace would give you more experience, but it will be harder if you have to complete school while working full time. If you have the benefit of completing school now without having to work full time I would do it. But if you need to work anyway, it might be an option for you.

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VICEDRN has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

1,078 Posts; 14,098 Profile Views

Why not look for a job as a Patient Care Tech? You should be able to find some jobs without having to go off on a totally different track and loose some time in school. (Assuming that you will have to take extra courses for LPN and then retake courses if your courses "expire" for the BSN.

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53 Posts; 1,763 Profile Views

Well, I am only 22 and I really don't have to work now because my parents help with everything, but I want to start working though. I have been in school long enough, and I am ready to enter the workforce. I wish I would have gone LPN, straight from hs and then I would be bridging now. I have let my parents run my life too much, and so now I am regretting a lot of decisions that I have ultimately made. I already have an Associate in Science, but I am not sure what I can do with that. I am just ready to work, I guess that's the biggest issue here. I would like to stay at my school, but that would mean more loans to take out, and more time spent in school.

Edited by MsLEE2121
chaNGE OF THOUGHT

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VICEDRN has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

1,078 Posts; 14,098 Profile Views

If you took a job as a tech, you might be able to stay in your program without feeling like you are just twiddling your thumbs. This is why I suggested this.

The nursing job market is kind of tight and it can be hard to find work as an LPN (depending on your area). This is something to consider.

Also, you talk about being ready to enter the workforce which frankly suggests that you would not necessarily be eager to return to school immediately after finishing your LPN. Sometimes, it really is better to stay the course.

Good luck!

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2,642 Posts; 14,866 Profile Views

It seems the only benefit to going the LPN route for you is asserting your independence faster.

From someone who's been on the other side of this equation....I do just want to remind you what an incredible blessing it is to not HAVE to work while you're in school. Taking advantage of your family's generosity for just a couple more years will likely serve you more in the long run.

I know it seems like forever from your perspective....but really, it will go by in the blink of an eye....then you have, literally, the REST of your life to work and support yourself. I don't really see a big advantage for you to jump the gun.

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In New Jersey LPN's are rarely used in a hospital setting. You will find LPN's in long term care facility or acute rehab centers. In my opinion if it is only going to take you an extra semester, go for the RN. I would then get a job in a hospital that will reinburse you for tuition and go for your BSN, MSN. This will make you more marketable and advancement will go quicker in the long run. If money is an issue, try to get a job in your local hospital as an aid while your going to school-most hospitals will hire new nurses from within thier own facility.:up:

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