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Does being able to work odd shifts help in the job search?

California   (1,092 Views 9 Comments)
by Mefs Mefs (New) New

564 Profile Views; 5 Posts

Hi,

I've read that many new grads are having a tough time finding work. Is this the case for all shifts or just the "standard" ones? I can work any shift including nights and weekends so I'm wondering if this will make the Job Search easier (or if it doesn't matter, and its tough regardless)

Thanks

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97 Posts; 2,598 Profile Views

(or if it doesn't matter, and its tough regardless)

Yep.

Every once in a while you will see the article or post from an experienced nurse who complains new grads are too picky or unwilling to work nights/weekends and that is the reason for the slim job prospects. Those days are long gone.

People are desperate and willing to take jobs in any unit or non nursing positions (electronic charting tech support) and sometimes unpaid internships. In fact, it's rare you are even given a choice of what shift and in some cases the specific unit. They know the job market sucks and asking for shift accommodations will most likely get you cut. There are at least 50 other new grads willing to take any shift.

Heard from someone else that with the job prospects so bad, when interviewing new grads about which unit they would like to work in, a very common response they get is "Any unit". Don't do this; show that you have a passion for a specific specialty but also indicate you are open to other units.

Edited by B52-H

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5 Posts; 564 Profile Views

Thanks. Will having an MSN be a significant advantage for me, or is this also not a big factor?

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97 Posts; 2,598 Profile Views

Nah. Whether you're a new grad ADN, BSN or MSN, you still have no experience and are in the same pile with everyone else.

"Here, you are all equally worthless." - Gunnery Sergeant Hartman (R. Lee Ermey), "Full Metal Jacket"

:rotfl: Sorry couldn't resist, it was the first thing that popped into my head as I was typing this.

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5 Posts; 564 Profile Views

Thanks, I suppose I could move somewhere else then. Eventually I would want to come back home (So Cal) though.

Once I have a year of experience is it relatively easier to find a job, or still not much different (in that case how about 2 years?)

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97 Posts; 2,598 Profile Views

If you can move out of California you will definitely increase your chances, just be prepared because it's still tough in a lot of desirable states.

A year of experience is what most open positions listed on so cal hospital websites require. A lot of these are just fillers; positions that they really have no interest in filling. So do not use these postings to gauge what the job market is like.

Maybe a recent job hunting nurse in the so cal area can weigh in.

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NickiLaughs has 10 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Emergency, Trauma, Critical Care.

2,363 Posts; 34,388 Profile Views

I would apply everywhere, be persistent, be very detailed in your clinical experience as a student on your resume. Make sure to have two letters of recommendation ready to roll upon graduation, get a teacher who is willing to be used as a reference and get their phone number! Anyone in the medical profession who knows you as well.

If you do get a job out of state, coming back with a year experience works, but I'm noticing a big push for BSNs, out here in OC most hospitals won't even let you apply without one now. So if you don't have it, get it, and I'd aim for more like a year and a half to two years experience.

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jelly221,RN has 3 years experience and specializes in Neurosciences, cardiac, critical care.

306 Posts; 9,457 Profile Views

I would apply everywhere, be persistent, be very detailed in your clinical experience as a student on your resume. Make sure to have two letters of recommendation ready to roll upon graduation, get a teacher who is willing to be used as a reference and get their phone number! Anyone in the medical profession who knows you as well.

If you do get a job out of state, coming back with a year experience works, but I'm noticing a big push for BSNs, out here in OC most hospitals won't even let you apply without one now. So if you don't have it, get it, and I'd aim for more like a year and a half to two years experience.

Thanks for the great advice! Can I ask, when you say to be very detailed about your clinical experience, do you just mean listing the units that you've done clinicals & preceptorship in? That's what mine is right now. Should I add any more details? Thanks!

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3 Followers; 36,914 Posts; 97,817 Profile Views

I would think that flexible availability would be an advantage when a job with odd hours is posted.

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