Mandatory co-author?

  1. Have you heard of schools who require the DNP capstone faculty mentor to be listed as co-author on the final product when it is submitted for publication? What is your take on this practice?
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    About Jules A

    Joined: Aug '06; Posts: 8,904; Likes: 13,680

    19 Comments

  3. by   chare
    Yes. In my master's NP program, when we submitted our final manuscript for publication we were required to not only list our faculty mentor, but the program director as well.
  4. by   Jules A
    Quote from chare
    Yes. In my master's NP program, when we submitted our final manuscript for publication we were required to not only list our faculty mentor, but the program director as well.
    As an author or honorable mention? What did you think about that?
  5. by   elkpark
    It's common in academic circles for additional people to be listed as authors as a "courtesy" (a mandatory "courtesy"); e.g., the big-name director of a research lab automatically gets listed as author, often as first author, of any publications arising from research done by the team in the lab, even if that individual had no direct role or participation in that particular research study, because it was done by "her/his" team in her/his lab. There's a lot of academic etiquette and tradition involved in who gets listed as authors, and in what order, on academic publications. In this case, the capstone mentor played a significant role in the development and outcome of the capstone project; in academia, people routinely get listed as co-authors for a lot less.
  6. by   chare
    Quote from Jules A
    As an author or honorable mention? What did you think about that?
    Both were listed as authors. As the program director was very involved in reviewing and revising my manuscript, I had no problem listing her as an author, and would not have submitted without her listed.
  7. by   llg
    I don't think of it as "just a courtesy." I think of it as totally appropriate. Presumably, your main adviser gave you advice on the project. In essence, your project "came out of his/her lab." The time and attention she gave you was time and attention that was made unavailable for her own research. Publications are the currency of academia. Advising students is a form of academic work. Giving your adviser the proper credit for the work they helped you to produce is appropriate. That is why it is a common rule in many, many programs.
  8. by   broughden
    Funny how outside of academia this is called simply "editing" and you dont get co-author credit for helping an author edit their work. You get a thank you in the acknowledgements.

    But when in Rome....
  9. by   elkpark
    Quote from broughden
    Funny how outside of academia this is called simply "editing" and you dont get co-author credit for helping an author edit their work. You get a thank you in the acknowledgements.

    But when in Rome....
    Thesis, capstone, and dissertation readers do a lot more than just "edit" the final document. They are directly involved in every aspect of the project from its inception, and guide and teach the student through the entire process.
  10. by   broughden
    Quote from elkpark
    Thesis, capstone, and dissertation readers do a lot more than just "edit" the final document. They are directly involved in every aspect of the project from its inception, and guide and teach the student through the entire process.
    Thank you, that makes more sense. What was stated previously just sounded like editing work.

    Although why the head of a lab should get author credit simply for running a school's lab, if they aren't providing real substantive input, still makes no sense.
  11. by   elkpark
    Quote from broughden
    Thank you, that makes more sense. What was stated previously just sounded like editing work.

    Although why the head of a lab should get author credit simply for running a school's lab, if they aren't providing real substantive input, still makes no sense.
    We're not talking about people who are "simply ... running a school's lab," we're talking about senior researchers, academics who are well-known in their fields and have significant bodies of research, who are heads of major research programs. They have other professionals and students working under them in their primary research program. They mentor and lead those other researchers and research assistants, and they bring in the research funding that makes the program possible. It's common for the "underling" researchers to do smaller, individual research projects "on the side," often with data collected as part of the primary research project, and write up and publish those smaller projects. When that occurs, the primary researcher typically gets listed as a co-author, because s/he a) provided the funding that paid for the research being published, b) is doing the primary, "big," research the smaller project was "spun off" of, c) provided the researchers with the opportunity to be doing the research in the first place, and d) mentors and guides the researchers publishing the smaller project day in and day out over time. Do you have any experience with research universities? All of this is common.
  12. by   broughden
    Quote from elkpark
    Do you have any experience with research universities? All of this is common.
    Nope. Personally I blame you. ;-) If you had simply posted all this helpful information in the first place I wouldn't have asked all these stupid questions and looked like an idiot.
    Its all your fault.
    LOL

    But seriously thanks for taking the time to explain it.
  13. by   Jules A
    Quote from elkpark
    We're not talking about people who are "simply ... running a school's lab," we're talking about senior researchers, academics who are well-known in their fields and have significant bodies of research, who are heads of major research programs. They have other professionals and students working under them in their primary research program. They mentor and lead those other researchers and research assistants, and they bring in the research funding that makes the program possible. It's common for the "underling" researchers to do smaller, individual research projects "on the side," often with data collected as part of the primary research project, and write up and publish those smaller projects. When that occurs, the primary researcher typically gets listed as a co-author, because s/he a) provided the funding that paid for the research being published, b) is doing the primary, "big," research the smaller project was "spun off" of, c) provided the researchers with the opportunity to be doing the research in the first place, and d) mentors and guides the researchers publishing the smaller project day in and day out over time. Do you have any experience with research universities? All of this is common.
    I must not be well versed in the etiquette either? To be clear I'm referring to the instructor, not some hibrow researcher or well known expert, who has been assigned and is paid by the university to be an advisor for the NP student's capstone.
  14. by   elkpark
    Quote from Jules A
    I must not be well versed in the etiquette either? To be clear I'm referring to the instructor, not some hibrow researcher or well known expert, who has been assigned and is paid by the university to be an advisor for the NP student's capstone.
    I realize you're talking about your faculty mentor, and that that's a different situation. I mentioned primary researchers as another example of the multiple situations in which people in academic settings get listed as co-authors, and was responding to broughden's comment about someone "simply" running a lab. Sorry -- didn't mean to highjack the thread.

    Short answer is still yes, it's a common practice to list your thesis/capstone reader as co-author if you publish.

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