Jump to content

Docs disrespecting RN's - from the NY Times

News   (15,507 Views 88 Comments)
by want2banrn want2banrn (Member) Member

2,522 Profile Views; 82 Posts

You are reading page 6 of Docs disrespecting RN's - from the NY Times. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

3 Followers; 4,515 Posts; 35,414 Profile Views

Is it possible the nurse simply lacked sense of humor and the skill of a good comeback? I've seen officers in the military try this with NCOs, but the good NCOs never let 'em get away with it. Officers and Docs put their pants on one leg at a time and poop in a toilet just like i do. :twocents:

True enough! But the NCO's still had to be respectful in action and word, if not at heart. It is a skill to be learned. Humor, tolerable comebacks - they add spice to life and let us vent harmlessly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 1,016 Posts; 13,673 Profile Views

I've had docs who have been mean, but usually none of the nurses like these particular doctors. However, we REALLY like and respect the ones who treat us decently.

Now, if I was a doctor, wouldn't I want to be one of the docs that was LIKED by the nurses?

Really -- who wants to be a hated person. I wouldn't.

We even had contests and would post the pictures of the physician of the month ...whom we voted on in terms of who demonstrated the best customer service attitude. It was usually just our favorite doc. Those docs were SERIOUSLY proud of having their pic posted up in the nursing station. It mean they were truly respected and at the top of their game.

I just laugh at the nincompoops who are such petulant children they can't be decent to nurses. It just shows such a lack of CLASS. Usually, the meaner they are the more it sends me into a laughing fit. I am so beyond taking it personally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

5 Followers; 4 Articles; 20,896 Posts; 147,070 Profile Views

True enough! But the NCO's still had to be respectful in action and word, if not at heart. It is a skill to be learned. Humor, tolerable comebacks - they add spice to life and let us vent harmlessly.

That reminds me of a story........

I remember a long time ago a cardiac surgeon who was NOTORIOUS in his exploits (I personally have never wanted to dip into the MD pool).....but for whatever reason (I think because I was newly divorced) he decided to pour it on in pursuit....:cool:. One day he was relentless about going to dinner.......I finally turned around and told him "Dr.----- I'm extremely easy.....I'm just not cheap";)

He said...."Not cheap! No NOT cheap! Nice Place!!! Very nice place!" I stopped dead in my tracks....I turned around....I got very close to his face and placed my finger on his chest throught the V in his scrubs and I said......."You misunderstand........You know that 1963 XKE convertable Jag convertable you have?" a classic beautiful vehicle by the way......"Sign me the title and I will give you a night you will NEVER forget.....:smokin:"

A look of utter horror :eek: came over his face followed by hysterical laughter....."Ha! Ha! Ha! She easy! She NO cheap.......She want my Jag!!!!" and continued to laugh all the way down the hallway. My manager had just come around the corner looked at me and said "I can't believe that just came out of your mouth!" I told her "Yeah...... but I'll bet ya he'll never ask me out again!" and we both fell on the floor in hysteics......:lol2:

Ah....the good ole days.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

222 Posts; 4,499 Profile Views

That reminds me of a story........

I remember a long time ago a cardiac surgeon who was NOTORIOUS in his exploits (I personally have never wanted to dip into the MD pool).....but for whatever reason (I think because I was newly divorced) he decided to pour it on in pursuit....:cool:. One day he was relentless about going to dinner.......I finally turned around and told him "Dr.----- I'm extremely easy.....I'm just not cheap";)

He said...."Not cheap! No NOT cheap! Nice Place!!! Very nice place!" I stopped dead in my tracks....I turned around....I got very close to his face and placed my finger on his chest throught the V in his scrubs and I said......."You misunderstand........You know that 1963 XKE convertable Jag convertable you have?" a classic beautiful vehicle by the way......"Sign me the title and I will give you a night you will NEVER forget.....:smokin:"

A look of utter horror :eek: came over his face followed by hysterical laughter....."Ha! Ha! Ha! She easy! She NO cheap.......She want my Jag!!!!" and continued to laugh all the way down the hallway. My manager had just come around the corner looked at me and said "I can't believe that just came out of your mouth!" I told her "Yeah...... but I'll bet ya he'll never ask me out again!" and we both fell on the floor in hysteics......:lol2:

Ah....the good ole days.......

That's hilarious! :lol2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

herring_RN specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical.

3 Followers; 2,930 Posts; 98,334 Profile Views

I work in LTC. We have one doctor that is a real jerk to all the nurses. None of us ever want to call him after office hours. No matter what the reason is that we are calling, he will tell us- "If it's bad enough for you to be wasting my time at this hour then send them to the hospital". We have complained about this doctor many times but it does no good. Also, when a nurse tries to stand up to him, he hangs up on her and won't return pages.

Most of the doctors that we work with are good. This one jerk just ruins it for them all!

We nurses on our unit reported a doctor to the medical board for not answering when paged.

We had written incident reports and had to call the medical director yet still he didn't answer.

The final straw was when we called another physician in an emergency. The patient needed emergency vascular surgery. This doctor strolled in five hours later asking. "So what was the big emergency that you paged me so many times?"

He "Retired" for a couple years aabout a month after being reported.

Imagine a long term care facility sending patients to the hospital when an order from the physician could prevent it? Just plain wrong!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

1 Article; 2,636 Posts; 20,346 Profile Views

That's what I do - try to be courteous no matter what. Why should I lower myself to scrap with them? I'm older, not as feisty as in my younger days, and kind of kill them with kindness now. I am much more secure in my personhood now than I was when younger, I respect myself therefore I can tolerate and better understand those who must announce their full credentials q call.

I wonder if this woman is happily married or has some love interest in her life. Does she have the children that most of us have? Or have these things been more or less denied her? What has happened to make her so severe?

I knew a doctor like her in the past. I was curious as to why she was that way. I once said to her, "You must have worked awfully hard to become the best "trauma surgeon" in _____ (our state). We are definitely blessed to have you at our hospital, Dr. _____." Yes, it's a little flattery. So what? She might really have been the best.

Well, she gradually became more relaxed around me. She'd come to me to go over new orders she'd written to make sure I could read and comprehend them before she left, which I greatly appreciated, as it's not always so easy.

I did kind of spoil her. I would round with her, help get her charts, make sure there were progress sheets and order sheets readily available, ask if she'd like some coffee, and make sure her labs and VS were all easy to find. And why not? It was a way of benefitting the patients, it helped me to know as much as I could about the patients, it caused her to be nicer to me, and it allowed me to keep being me - a nice gentlemanly nurse.

She even eased off a little from being so harsh with other nurses, who usually scattered to the 4 winds when she showed up. No, she didn't become a sweet angel, but she did get a little nicer and less impatient.

It eventually came out that she had lost a child and her husband had left her for a younger woman. That plus the terrible expense and the long, long years of inadequate sleep, and having to claw her way up a steeper hill than male students and doctors all contributed to her difficult personality. Should she have brought it to work? don't some of us have plenty of hardships and expenses that we have endured? Of course. But maybe we can let them make us more understanding, not angry and mean. Or am I a dinosaur and it's "fight on" these days in Nursing?

"gentlemanly nurse"

God I hope I'm not. :eek:

I do agree with you that sometimes if you can find the CAUSE of why someone is the way there are, it helps to understand their behavior. It doesn't EXCUSE it, but it helps to have a little understanding. You never know, you just might be the one to help that person when they have been struggling for so long and no one else gave a rat's behind about them but you. I do find that I will help along a newer resident when they are accomodating with me. You scratch my back, I'll scratch yours. When I go get a cup of coffee, I'll bring one back to the doc that helped me out. It's a mutually beneficial relationship and needs to be cultivated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

herring_RN specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical.

3 Followers; 2,930 Posts; 98,334 Profile Views

I recently attended a CE class where a nurse reported a unique method of dealing with a bullying surgeon. They call a "Code MD"

Available staff stares at him until he stops yelling, insulting, and blaming nursing staff.

Now the nurse just asks him, "Do you want me to call a "Code MD"?" and he calms down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

1 Article; 2,636 Posts; 20,346 Profile Views

I recently attended a CE class where a nurse reported a unique method of dealing with a bullying surgeon. They call a "Code MD"

Available staff stares at him until he stops yelling, insulting, and blaming nursing staff.

Now the nurse just asks him, "Do you want me to call a "Code MD"?" and he calms down.

they should definitely have this for nurses too. Code RN, haaaaa!!!

I can just imagine - it would be like "don't make me push the button to call a code on your arse." Haa!! I'm am DYING laughing right now.

A big red button - kindof like those at a gym where there are muscle heads who are too testosterone driven and make too much noise - you hit the button to eliminate those kinds of behaviors/types. The same could TOTALLY apply to the hospital! PERFECT!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

63 Posts; 2,251 Profile Views

I'm actually a medical student in my clinical years currently and, to be honest, a lot of this disrespect (at least in my experience and those of my close friends at other med schools) is really indoctrinated by the nursing and ancillary staff rather than attendings/residents. As another poster so eloquently said, "poop flows downhill." You might be surprised but the nursing (and other ancillary staff...though it's generally the nurses) really crap on med students and residents. The first thing we're taught when we enter the clinical years is don't anger the nurses. If you do, you will never get more than an hour's rest on on call duties. On some rotations, residents brought donuts/other breakfast items in everyday to "appease" the nurses; apparently, the nurses on staff are known to page you constantly at night for irrelevant stuff if you didn't. Who's side are the attendings going to take? The nurses, who have been there for a while and will be there for a while, or the residents who will be there only for the 3-7 years of training? Hint: it's the nurses.

So, please, please, please, before pointing fingers at the medical profession, take a look in the mirror and ask whether the nursing environment at your practice is conducive to those who are undgergoing medical training. Like I said, myself and others at not only my schools, but many other close friends I have at other med schools, have had horrible, horrible experiences with the nurses at the hospitals we rotate at. The nurses have been far more hurtful and disrespectful to us than even the most brutal attendings we have had. We have not been indoctrinated to dislike the nursing staff or treat them in a disrespectful way by those who are already physicians. It's actually the opposite! It's the horrible experiences we've had the with nursing staff treating us so terribly that have turned us against them. I promise you that the vast majority of us enter the medical profession excited to work with others to help patients. I just don't think it's fair to point fingers solely at physicians when, in my own and many other medical students' experiences, the nursing staff have played a significant role in shaping the way our future selfs treat nurses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

170 Posts; 3,984 Profile Views

apparently, the nurses on staff are known to page you constantly at night for irrelevant stuff if you didn't.

hi, nice to meet you! i hear you on the above, the problem is that my hospital system has all these "rules" that say that even though i have a KCl sliding scale and can fix the K i still have to notify you and other silly things like that. really dumb and frankly almost insulting to the nurse. i will call if it's a "lab called over the critical value issue" but many times it's not. when i see the "sleep room" on my phone and i know it's over a stupid thing that the hospital makes me call about i feel so bad. i dont care about treats but is there anything your attendings can do about the silly calls?? :confused:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

herring_RN specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical.

3 Followers; 2,930 Posts; 98,334 Profile Views

I think the real problem in recent posts is the brutally long hours interns and residents endure. Lack of sleep is not OK. Why does the medical profession generally say, "I endured it so they can too."

I think something needs to change so new physicians are not told to buy junk for nurses to keep them from calling them at night.

Why would a nurse call a physician at night just to interrupt his or her rest? That is not acceptable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×