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Do you use a pocket manual?

Nurses   (1,930 Views 7 Comments)

Mrs. SnowStormRN is a RN and specializes in Mental Health, Medical Research, Periop.

8,779 Profile Views; 557 Posts

Hello. Years ago when I first got into nursing I carried around a little spiral pocket guide. Than I was working in MedSurg, and I loved how it gave quick references to certain things like common drug interactions. Now that I've decided to venture out of psych nursing (which I have been doing for the last 7 years) I think I need a new pocket guide to go back into acute care. Is there one you recommend? I have a Droid, maybe I should get with the times and download an app or something. :idea: Will this (app) work if I get poor service in a facility? Is there a good app I can search for and download? I just need a nice quick reference guide to carry around, as a "just in case" moment pops up. I know I rarely used it than, but oddly enough it felt good to have that handy. Any suggestions are appreciated.

Edited by Mrs. SnowStormRN

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loriangel14 is a RN and specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

1 Follower; 6,923 Posts; 36,209 Profile Views

A coworker of mine has the Medscape app. on her iPod Touch. It's great.

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Aymese has 6 years experience and specializes in cardiac (CCU/Heart Transplant, cath lab).

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I really like Medscape's application. It is an actual download so there is no need to worry about internet connection once you've installed it on your phone. It works for Blackberry, Iphone, Android. I like it becuase it has detailed drug references including interaction checker, conditions, and procedures. The topics under conditions are formatted very similarly to their online CE articles (pathophys, s/s, workup, tx). Examples of procedures include: ACLS/BLS guidelines, Acid base, cardiac markers, thoracentesis, TONS of others.

It is a free app but you have to sign up on Medscape, free also. I like it better than epocrates or micromedex, personally.

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Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

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ePocrates is a very nice app that is completely downloaded and free. It updates on its on as well. Additionally, there's a version you can pay for that includes diagnostic criteria. It's very nice.

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highlandlass1592 has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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Are you talking a pharm guide or a guide to help in acute care? I've got quite a few apps I use on my iPhone and also have a hard copy of my favorite general ICU reference, Kathy White's Fast Facts for Adult critical care. (She now has it available as an app for your phone).

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Mrs. SnowStormRN is a RN and specializes in Mental Health, Medical Research, Periop.

557 Posts; 8,779 Profile Views

Are you talking a pharm guide or a guide to help in acute care? I've got quite a few apps I use on my iPhone and also have a hard copy of my favorite general ICU reference, Kathy White's Fast Facts for Adult critical care. (She now has it available as an app for your phone).

An acute care guide that includes pharm info :cool:

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JustaGypsy specializes in ER, SANE, Home Health, Forensic.

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Okay, I guess I am an iPhone nerd... I have: Epocrates, Davis' drug guide, Medscape (free), Micromedex (also free), ACLS & PALS advisor, and Pedisafe. I use them all for various reasons... Some have duplicate info and some have different info I may use for various reasons. Pill identifier, y-site compatability, toxicology, lab values and interpretatiobs, walmart/target $4 plan list, etc. I can't function without my references!

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