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DNP vs MSN

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by susie6785 susie6785 (Member)

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Sherrylin22 has 1 years experience as a BSN, RN.

1 Like; 125 Visitors; 23 Posts

On 1/17/2017 at 2:42 PM, babyNP. said:

Aromatic, you could say the same thing for any degree (including a medical degree). I haven't paid a single cent towards the degree (nor do I intend to do so). The business plan was one assignment for one of the classes (indicated by my commas but I guess I didn't make it clear enough), not an entire class- and the lecture for it was done by a MD. nicktexas, I think you're right- although if you do BSN-->DNP you get 1,000 actual clinical hours, which isn't something you get in a MPH or MHA or a MSN. The DNP is less helpful for MSN-->DNP IMO if that is what you are considering.

I think this will be my last post on this thread because the rabbit hole is starting to deepen, but best of luck to the OP in whatever decision they make.

hi baby NP! From your reply on the classes I am really interested in taking!!! Which program did you go to? Thanks!!!

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1 Like; 907 Visitors; 68 Posts

I did not ADN then BSn then MSN then DNP then post masters for another specialty and now working on PhD.  It is not the path for everyone and some question my sanity, but I just am a glutton for wanting more.  I have friends who have their MSN and are happy and excellent NPs.  You do you.

The ones who I can't deal with are the insecure ones who bash the DNP degree fro no reason.  If its not for you, fine live your best self.

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djmatte has 7 years experience as a ADN, MSN, RN, NP and works as a Family Nurse Practitioner.

63 Likes; 2 Followers; 6,388 Visitors; 659 Posts

5 hours ago, OllieW said:

I did not ADN then BSn then MSN then DNP then post masters for another specialty and now working on PhD.  It is not the path for everyone and some question my sanity, but I just am a glutton for wanting more.  I have friends who have their MSN and are happy and excellent NPs.  You do you.

The ones who I can't deal with are the insecure ones who bash the DNP degree fro no reason.  If its not for you, fine live your best self.

There's valid reason to bash the DNP (note the construct... Not those who choose to get It). It isn't about insecurity. It's about calling out the idea that it is remotely important.  It's about calling a money grab what it is.  It's about np leadership wanting some higher level of prestige because they think somehow physicians will look at us differently with doctor in our title. In clinical practice, it gives no advantage.  

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

466 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 184,825 Visitors; 20,485 Posts

21 hours ago, djmatte said:

There's valid reason to bash the DNP (note the construct... Not those who choose to get It). It isn't about insecurity. It's about calling out the idea that it is remotely important.  It's about calling a money grab what it is.  It's about np leadership wanting some higher level of prestige because they think somehow physicians will look at us differently with doctor in our title. In clinical practice, it gives no advantage.  

Cant "like" this enough. The DNP gains you nothing in terms of prestige, clinically relevant experience nor does it further your career UNLESS you wish to enter academia. However, for those who pursue it, they must have some reason for it. To continually ask "is it worth it" its not something I can answer for someone else - for me, nope, no way, not in any way would I pursue it. 

 

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Angeljho is a MSN, NP and works as a Psych Nurse Practitioner.

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The way I see it, the DNP is a waste of time. There is no incentive to pursuing one other then a feeling of self accomplishment.

As a new NP, I'm seen as an attending with a full caseload. Meanwhile, residents are still learning, taking classes, and gaining a far better education that I could only dream of. Seeing these residents motivated me, so I looked more in-depth into DNP programs to see if I could enhance my clinical knowledge in a similar fashion. It turns out that the "practice based" terminal degree was just more fluff policy and research courses.

I'm hoping that either the DNP will shift focus and become an actual practice based degree that offers intensive clinical/pharm courses beyond the master's level or a new nursing terminal degree will come into play that does that. The DNP is just another PhD to me.

I'm actually thinking of pursuing med school, but that's a whole other topic for another day.

Edited by Angeljho

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199 Likes; 2 Followers; 5,507 Visitors; 936 Posts

I looked into the DNP fairly extensively. While some programs were obviously better than others, none impressed me to the point where I was willing to commit the time and money.

I am fairly close to retirement though. If I were 40, I would probably be doing it.

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