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DNP vs MD/DO

Doctoral   (5,104 Views | 34 Replies)

DrZaphod has 10 years experience and specializes in Psychiatry.

5,936 Profile Views; 69 Posts

1 Follower; 1,319 Posts; 12,477 Profile Views

Rarely do I get to read such biased, intellectually dishonest, self delusional BS.

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JustKeepDriving specializes in Forensic Psychiatry.

119 Posts; 4,213 Profile Views

Next time you make an appointment with your healthcare provider, make sure you see an NP doctor and don't accidentally get stuck with a physician!

Direct quote from the "Great site"aka literal word cancer

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SopranoKris has 5 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

3,085 Posts; 33,119 Profile Views

The article would be much more credible if all the sources mentioned were cited. Simply saying "studies have shown" with no references to back up the statements doesn't support the argument well.

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2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 105,796 Profile Views

The article would be much more credible if all the sources mentioned were cited. Simply saying "studies have shown" with no references to back up the statements doesn't support the argument well.

Also, does anyone else think it's odd that there is no indication whatsoever on the page of who wrote the piece and/or who is sponsoring the page?? (Or am I missing something?)

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489 Posts; 13,501 Profile Views

Also, does anyone else think it's odd that there is no indication whatsoever on the page of who wrote the piece and/or who is sponsoring the page?? (Or am I missing something?)

Very odd. This also appears to be the only page on the website.

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calivianya is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

2,418 Posts; 35,733 Profile Views

Man, someone's been drinking the Kool-aid.

Most of the nurses that I know who've gone on to become NPs are half paying attention to their online tests in the middle of answering call lights and wiping butts. Big difference between that and formal education in the classroom, plus residency... and the article conveniently forgot about the fellowships most MD specialties require you to have before you can get your "real job" as a MD. :sarcastic:

For the record, my PCP is a NP so I have nothing against them, but to act like the education between NP and MD/DO programs is equivalent is seriously misguided at best.

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nursetony9 has 9 years experience and specializes in Ambulatory Care, Geriatrics.

12 Posts; 984 Profile Views

Complete garbage. As a second year DNP student, I assure you, the level of education I am receiving at the doctoral level is nowhere near equivalent to that of an MD or DO. The DNP is not an asset to those who only want to be clinicians. Masters level APRNs have demonstrated for decades the actual value of the APRN to patient care. The DNP is nothing more than a pyramid scheme designed funnel money into academia while paradoxically stroking the egos of old battle-axe nurses who still parrot the ideas of Florence Nightengale. Well, sorry to break it to you, she's dead. Had I known what I was getting myself into with the DNP, I would have found an alternative NP program with a Masters level education.

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148 Posts; 4,948 Profile Views

While it is true that the author/owner of the page did not cite any sources, everything that is stated is pretty much dead on - at the same time, I don't disagree with those who state that medical school is more rigorous. However, the page does not discuss rigor of education, only years of study and outcomes.

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Elvish is a BSN, DNP, RN, NP and specializes in Community, OB, Nursery.

3 Followers; 17 Articles; 5,259 Posts; 67,866 Profile Views

I just defended my DNP project & research at my brick-and-mortar university. It was a rigorous program - mostly. There were some classes/assignments that were BS and fluff, which, after living with (American) med students for two weeks in Central America, I learned occurs in med school as well.

I won't equate my training - either undergrad or graduate - with that of physicians. I'm not a physician, don't want to be, will never pretend to be. I don't mind people calling me 'Dr. ______', though, because I have worked for that title, and it is not the property of physicians. I have friends with doctorates who are English professors, meteorologists, psychologists, physical therapists, pharmacists, and the list goes on. No one bats an eyelash when these folks go by their earned professional title, and I'll be damned if you're going to tell me I can't use mine. I don't go into patients' rooms and present myself as 'Dr. _______'; I present myself by my first and last name, which I've heard providers of all stripes do.

What I will defend, though, are outcomes of NP vs. MD. There is decades' worth of research that says NP outcomes are comparable to that of MDs, if not better. We know when we are in over our heads and speaking for myself, I have no problem referring out for issues that I can't safely deal with. The thing of having a collaborating physician is kind of silly. My most recent preceptor had a collaborating physician who was never on site, and she was the only provider in the building 4 days a week. If she had an issue she called him and he guided her, but he was literally never there to 'supervise.' The thing about healthcare is that - barring a practice somewhere extremely remote - you're always going to be collaborating with others. Physicians, other NPs, PAs, you name it. That's called giving good care, and all good providers do it (or should), not just NPs.

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148 Posts; 4,948 Profile Views

Congrats on your DNP! You're right - the issue really is outcomes. Another good indicator of the quality of care provided by NPs is the marked difference in malpractice claim frequency - which is present in both states that have some sort of collaboration agreement as well as the growing number of states where NPs have independent practice authority.

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Bluebolt has 6 years experience.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 560 Posts; 26,566 Profile Views

I just defended my DNP project & research at my brick-and-mortar university. It was a rigorous program - mostly. There were some classes/assignments that were BS and fluff, which, after living with (American) med students for two weeks in Central America, I learned occurs in med school as well.

I won't equate my training - either undergrad or graduate - with that of physicians. I'm not a physician, don't want to be, will never pretend to be. I don't mind people calling me 'Dr. ______', though, because I have worked for that title, and it is not the property of physicians. I have friends with doctorates who are English professors, meteorologists, psychologists, physical therapists, pharmacists, and the list goes on. No one bats an eyelash when these folks go by their earned professional title, and I'll be damned if you're going to tell me I can't use mine. I don't go into patients' rooms and present myself as 'Dr. _______'; I present myself by my first and last name, which I've heard providers of all stripes do.

What I will defend, though, are outcomes of NP vs. MD. There is decades' worth of research that says NP outcomes are comparable to that of MDs, if not better. We know when we are in over our heads and speaking for myself, I have no problem referring out for issues that I can't safely deal with. The thing of having a collaborating physician is kind of silly. My most recent preceptor had a collaborating physician who was never on site, and she was the only provider in the building 4 days a week. If she had an issue she called him and he guided her, but he was literally never there to 'supervise.' The thing about healthcare is that - barring a practice somewhere extremely remote - you're always going to be collaborating with others. Physicians, other NPs, PAs, you name it. That's called giving good care, and all good providers do it (or should), not just NPs.

As a student in a CRNA DNP program, I share your perspective. I think it's important to consider the education level the nay-sayer has achieved when they decry the DNP. It's easy to discredit something that you have never achieved. I can't speak for every DNP program available but I know from experience my CRNA DNP program is intensely difficult and rigorous.

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