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DNP NECESSARY????

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Hello there

Just a question. I am currently an FNP. I honestly had no interest in going for my DNP in the speed or with the stress level of my BSN / MSN. So basically I might do it, but it would be slowly and at my own pace. Now, considering I don’t plan to teaching in academia and I don’t want to go up with leadership in my institution (not that I don’t want to within my group, clinic, but not within the whole institution), is there a reason For me to do this DNP?? To be honest when chatting with colleagues I get a sense of “I’m doing it because of a title”. Which I don’t want to do. Will this be REQUIRED at some point? How should I take getting my DNP?

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Hoosier_RN has 27 years experience as a MSN and specializes in dialysis.

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1 hour ago, TheFuture09 said:

Hello there

Just a question. I am currently an FNP. I honestly had no interest in going for my DNP in the speed or with the stress level of my BSN / MSN. So basically I might do it, but it would be slowly and at my own pace. Now, considering I don’t plan to teaching in academia and I don’t want to go up with leadership in my institution (not that I don’t want to within my group, clinic, but not within the whole institution), is there a reason For me to do this DNP?? To be honest when chatting with colleagues I get a sense of “I’m doing it because of a title”. Which I don’t want to do. Will this be REQUIRED at some point? How should I take getting my DNP?

That will dependent on your state, as far as requirement. You will need to listen for the buzz, so to speak. Ask around you state professional org for clearer answers

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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How old are you? How many years do you still want to work as an NP? Those numbers are part of the picture. Do you live in a city -- or in a rural area? What's happening in your area? Are most NP's getting their DNP or only a few?

These are important factors to consider. If you are within 10 years of retirement and in a stable job that you are likely to keep for the remainder of your career and you live in an area with DNP's are not common ... then you probably have nothing to worry about. However, if you are in your 20's, likely to move a couple of times in your life and/or live in an area where just about everyone has a DNP, that's a whole different story. You are likely to need a DNP to remain competitive in the job market over the next 40 years of your career.

Odds are ... you are somewhere in between those 2 extreme scenarios. You need to figure out where you are on the continuum that connects them and make your decision based on YOUR situation.

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verene is a MSN and specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

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DNP worth depends on many things - how many years do you anticipate having in your career at this point? Do you work/live in a highly competitive environment or are FNPs few and fare between? Do you have aspirations of stepping into management, leadership or teaching role(s) down the line? What is the practice environment in your state (some are moving towards DNP entry to practice) and do you foresee changes?

I personally am at the start of my career, see potential for leadership/teaching down the road, and live in an area where more and more NPs are jumping on the DNP bandwagon (and many schools are moving over to DNP entry to practice over the next couple of years). Additionally, my current employer does offer increased pay as incentive. While I could probably practice for many years with out it, I am concerned that 20-30 years down the road I will probably want to have it for flexibility in jobs and potential career advancement. Since I'm likely to stay with my current employer for several years the increased pay it will bring also makes it more financially worthwhile both in terms of salary and ultimately increases my retirement savings as well. I did work with my program director though to switch to part-time status as I'm pretty burnt out on grad school after my masters.

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adammRN has 11 years experience and specializes in DNP/PMHNP student.

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Do you want a terminal degree? Do you want a higher position which requires more time & education? Can you get it paid for? Do you want to not have to return to school? Do you want more respect? Do you want to be called a doctor like all the other practice disciplines? DPT, DDS, PharmD...etc

I am in a big TX city and most of the MSNs are finishing their DNP. I am almost done with a BSN-DNP. There are so many reasons to do it if you can.

The only exception I can think to say not to do it is if you are a seasoned nurse practitioner with years of EXP making a great salary, I would probably say it's not worth it. The DNP is only still just a recommendation and MSN is still entry to practice. However, it does open doors and there is more respect I have witnessed first hand from doing it. Maybe you want to do something down the line where it might help.

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Numenor has 8 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in Internal Medicine.

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9 hours ago, adammRN said:

Do you want a terminal degree? Do you want a higher position which requires more time & education? Can you get it paid for? Do you want to not have to return to school? Do you want more respect? Do you want to be called a doctor like all the other practice disciplines? DPT, DDS, PharmD...etc

I am in a big TX city and most of the MSNs are finishing their DNP. I am almost done with a BSN-DNP. There are so many reasons to do it if you can.

The only exception I can think to say not to do it is if you are a seasoned nurse practitioner with years of EXP making a great salary, I would probably say it's not worth it. The DNP is only still just a recommendation and MSN is still entry to practice. However, it does open doors and there is more respect I have witnessed first hand from doing it. Maybe you want to do something down the line where it might help.

So I work as an ARNP ( I did a year long fellowship as well). No one in clinical practice cares about the DNP and 90% of HR personnel and 99% of physicians in my experience barely even know there are different NP specialties. I have seen 0 job posting specifically requiring a doctorate nor have I seen pay bonuses. Maybe it s different in Texas but in a 100% practice rights state that I live in, no one even mentions it.

Also no DNP I work with calls themselves a "doctor" in practice. Just reality. I despised the DNP garbage fluff so much I went after a 2nd masters in the humanities...

My year long fellowship(essentially intern year since I was pared with residents) was worth more than an entire NP program many times over. I'd suggest someone investing their time in a fellowship over extra fluff schooling. That's what actually matters.

Edited by Numenor

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On 3/30/2020 at 9:17 AM, llg said:

How old are you? How many years do you still want to work as an NP? Those numbers are part of the picture. Do you live in a city -- or in a rural area? What's happening in your area? Are most NP's getting their DNP or only a few?

These are important factors to consider. If you are within 10 years of retirement and in a stable job that you are likely to keep for the remainder of your career and you live in an area with DNP's are not common ... then you probably have nothing to worry about. However, if you are in your 20's, likely to move a couple of times in your life and/or live in an area where just about everyone has a DNP, that's a whole different story. You are likely to need a DNP to remain competitive in the job market over the next 40 years of your career.

Odds are ... you are somewhere in between those 2 extreme scenarios. You need to figure out where you are on the continuum that connects them and make your decision based on YOUR situation.

Good morning. Thanks for your message. I am in my early 30’s. I live in a busy city-suburb city in Texas. Yes people are getting their DNP. Not everyone but Most def some. A lot of reasons I hear is for titleee; very few tell me they actually want to go up in leadership within their institution Or be an educator. I don’t want to do neither of those. My own clinic, maybe! I feel like it makes me nervous, but it’s something I don’t truly want to do. I can work as an NP and get places I need to get and open businesses I would like to open. Just saying! I am not saying I will never go back, but I don’t want to be extremely stressed about it. I rather start a family first and do it slowly at one point in life I do. I have about 5 years experience as an NP.

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16 hours ago, adammRN said:

Do you want a terminal degree? Do you want a higher position which requires more time & education? Can you get it paid for? Do you want to not have to return to school? Do you want more respect? Do you want to be called a doctor like all the other practice disciplines? DPT, DDS, PharmD...etc

I am in a big TX city and most of the MSNs are finishing their DNP. I am almost done with a BSN-DNP. There are so many reasons to do it if you can.

The only exception I can think to say not to do it is if you are a seasoned nurse practitioner with years of EXP making a great salary, I would probably say it's not worth it. The DNP is only still just a recommendation and MSN is still entry to practice. However, it does open doors and there is more respect I have witnessed first hand from doing it. Maybe you want to do something down the line where it might help.

Yes I want a terminal degree, but not for a title only. Before DNP got famous I did not think I would go for that. Maybe a PHD one day down the line. No, I have not seen to many say they are paying much more for it. Even in bigger institutions. Being called doctor—yes! Not bad, but I am still an NP. I can’t disagree that respect won’t be granted—but I also respect any NP because I know what they do and they don’t have to have a DNP to earn my respect. Although I get what your saying as far as respect in other ways. I also know a few DNP that has not worked a day as a NP. Not that they can’t get experience down the line, but I take pride in my about 5 years of knowing what I am doing confidently as a clinician.

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KatieMI has 6 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

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Until either a state's Board make DNP a mandatory prerequisite for licensure, or a facility makes decision to hire DNP only, it won't be mandatory.

Schools may push DNP as much as they want because of $$$$$ they charge for complete fluff but they still have zero executive power. Same goes about national nursing organizations like AANP. They can "recommend" everything they want, they cannot enforce anything.

Personally, I am going to shell > $20000 next year for specialty certificate MSN but will consider DNP only if it will be 90+% clinical degree with specialty focus and taught on the level of medical school. Not going to pay a red cent for studying policing and schmolicing, and under no circumstances ever will accept a job in so-called "leadership".

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22 hours ago, KatieMI said:

Until either a state's Board make DNP a mandatory prerequisite for licensure, or a facility makes decision to hire DNP only, it won't be mandatory.

Schools may push DNP as much as they want because of $$$$$ they charge for complete fluff but they still have zero executive power. Same goes about national nursing organizations like AANP. They can "recommend" everything they want, they cannot enforce anything.

Personally, I am going to shell > $20000 next year for specialty certificate MSN but will consider DNP only if it will be 90+% clinical degree with specialty focus and taught on the level of medical school. Not going to pay a red cent for studying policing and schmolicing, and under no circumstances ever will accept a job in so-called "leadership".

WOW!! I do like how you put that. I think I feel some of your way to. As I said—sometimes I consider PHD in public health and things of that sort as well. Just me! I feel a mental pressure you get when people are running towards DNP—but I don’t usually hear a purpose or them moving anywhere in leadership within their institution and etc. I get it, long term “just in case”. We will see!
I have never thought it was good to just copy others without my own purpose.

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On 4/1/2020 at 2:33 AM, Numenor said:

So I work as an ARNP ( I did a year long fellowship as well). No one in clinical practice cares about the DNP and 90% of HR personnel and 99% of physicians in my experience barely even know there are different NP specialties. I have seen 0 job posting specifically requiring a doctorate nor have I seen pay bonuses. Maybe it s different in Texas but in a 100% practice rights state that I live in, no one even mentions it.

Also no DNP I work with calls themselves a "doctor" in practice. Just reality. I despised the DNP garbage fluff so much I went after a 2nd masters in the humanities...

My year long fellowship(essentially intern year since I was pared with residents) was worth more than an entire NP program many times over. I'd suggest someone investing their time in a fellowship over extra fluff schooling. That's what actually matters.

I agree with you Numenor! I do think the majority of DNP programs are fluff and you're pretty much doing the same thing as in an MSN research class. It drove me crazy for yeeears and I refused to get a DNP as well. My feelings about this were SUPER strong. I honestly think the best thing is to get another degree that you can monetize (ie maybe an MBA if that's your thing or a subspecialty certificate (for example...maybe doing Psych NP if you're a FNP and want to work in psych).

I am a WHNP considering my options of becoming a midwife (since I'm relocating to a state where WHNPs only work in offices and I love Being in the hospital setting on the labor floor and wouldn't mind delivering babies).

Now with that being said, I am finally warming up to the idea of a DNP because I want to teach within the next 5 years, be involved in health policies and want to have practical application to those roles. I would only consider programs that actually give me something WORTH MY MONEY, no fluff!

Now, is it necessary? No. But looking at the market, you do have a competitive edge with a DNP + the experience. 

If marketability doesn't require it, then no need to think about it. But these recent times have shown us to be prepared for anything life throws your way. If your job is paying for it, go at it at your own pace!

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KatieMI has 6 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

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2 hours ago, Ria21 said:

 

Now with that being said, I am finally warming up to the idea of a DNP because I want to teach within the next 5 years, be involved in health policies and want to have practical application to those roles. I would only consider programs that actually give me something WORTH MY MONEY, no fluff!

 

I work in a academic teaching hospital and, before all that jazz with COVID19 had started, always was more than welcome to get a PA or NP student to precept. I could teach them all the real stuff of internal medicine, no fluff at all, for like additional 5% in salary.

On my previous job I made a grassroot non-mandatory  nursing educational program which was quite effective in decreasing call burden on providers. AFAIK, nursing educators there continue it still because it is just funny and useful and only one expense (except time and mental efforts) are Hershey kisses. 

Ans, trust me, after you work for a while in a hospital and people get familiar with your face, you will be likely welcomed in many committees and can participate in policies development and their practical applications. You won't need DNP for that. If after some (usually quite a bit) of time you would like to move to administrative side permanently, then DNP and even MBA could come handy, but at that point your employer might want to pay for them. 

IMHO, the best thing in current climate for an NP who wants to have an edge is having specialty certificate and diverse work experience. The more places one can work in, the better. 

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