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DNAP vs DNP With a Specialization in Anesthesia

SRNA   (900 Views 6 Comments)
by Carterjcr Carterjcr (Member)

1,078 Visitors; 42 Posts

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I want to make sure that what I am saying is correct. I know that becoming a CRNA requires either a DNAP degree or a DNP with specialization with Anesthesiology degree. The DNAP degree is sometimes not seen as a terminal degree or not the best if you ever decide to teach. Also, if you decide that this specialty is not for you after receiving a DNAP degree you would have to do a new four year DNP degree towards a new specialty to change your specialty. There is no one year DNP certificate towards a new specialty for people with a DNAP degree, correct? A DNP with a specialization in Anesthesia degree is seen as a terminal degree and best if you ever decide to teach. Also, if you have a DNP with a specialization in Anesthesia degree and later find out that this specialty is not for you. You can do a one year DNP certificate towards a new specialty to change your specialty, correct? Thank you for any feedback.

Edited by Carterjcr

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Shanimal has 6 years experience and works as a Nurse Anesthesia Student, Critical Care RN.

5,016 Visitors; 184 Posts

The DNAP degree is sometimes not seen as a terminal degree or not the best if you ever decide to teach.

Incorrect. Both the DNP and DNAP are considered terminal degrees. Having one vs. the other as a CRNA does not affect one's prospects for teaching in a nurse anesthesia program. Both would be doctorally-prepared CRNAs.

Also, if you decide that this specialty is not for you after receiving a DNAP degree you would have to do a new four year DNP degree towards a new specialty to change your specialty.

Also incorrect. There are post-graduate degree programs and post-graduate certificate programs to enter into other advanced practice nursing specialties. The length of these programs vary, but having a DNAP vs. DNP degree has no effect on this that I'm aware of, nor should it. That would be silly.

There is no one year DNP certificate towards a new specialty for people with a DNAP degree, correct?

The length of a post-graduate program is independent of whether one enters it having a DNP in anesthesia vs. a DNAP.

A DNP with a specialization in Anesthesia degree is seen as a terminal degree and best if you ever decide to teach.

Same as answer #1.

Also, if you have a DNP with a specialization in Anesthesia degree and later find out that this specialty is not for you. You can do a one year DNP certificate towards a new specialty to change your specialty, correct?

See answers #2 and #3.

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1,078 Visitors; 42 Posts

Thank you so much for the feedback, Shanimal. Thank you for clarifying everything. I only had a slim idea about the differences between a DNP vs DNAP.

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Shanimal has 6 years experience and works as a Nurse Anesthesia Student, Critical Care RN.

5,016 Visitors; 184 Posts

DNAP vs. DNP in anesthesia degrees creates a lot of confusion. Both are terminal degrees for CRNAs, and soon having one or the other will be the entry-to-practice requirement. The actual difference between the two degrees is that the DNAP is typically awarded through a School of Medicine, School of Allied Health, or some such while the DNP is awarded through a School of Nursing. A side-by-side comparison of the DNAP vs. DNP in anesthesia curriculum though is quite comparable.

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

505 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 185,002 Visitors; 20,514 Posts

Moved to SRNA forum

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6 Likes; 1 Follower; 12,588 Visitors; 678 Posts

I agree with Shanimal. Some DNP nurse anesthesia programs may prefer faculty with an DNP, but some DNAP programs may prefer DNAP faculty. In general programs have a hard time finding good faculty, so they are looking for a good fit.

As for curriculum, the DNAP programs have more flexibility because they don't have to follow the nursing accreditors. Currently programs are struggling with all the required nonanesthesia courses in some DNP programs and how that is affecting their NCE pass rate. Some are switching the DNAP so that they can control the curriculum more.

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