Swine flu raises fear of pandemic - Adults and Children - page 19

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  1. by   I love my cat!
    Quote from DeepFriedRN
    I recall my grandmother saying that her mother, when one of the kids got sick with something (say, the mumps--this was before vaccinations), would plop the rest of them in the room with the sick one, so they'd all just get it and get it over with. Then they'd all be immune from then on..Kind of a scary thought, though..
    Reminds me of the Southpark episode, CHICKENPOX: The boys get angry and seek revenge when they discover that their parents orchestrated a sleepover at Kenny's house so that they could all get Chickenpox.
  2. by   DeepFriedRN
    Quote from I love my cat!
    Reminds me of the Southpark episode, CHICKENPOX: The boys get angry and seek revenge when they discover that their parents orchestrated a sleepover at Kenny's house so that they could all get Chickenpox.
    HAHAHAHA!! I freaking love Southpark..
  3. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from oramar
    I remember HK very well, have posted about it. Was a young LPN working then, plus a young mom. It made it's first pass in 1968. I didn't get it that time, even though I was working. It came roaring back in 1972, for some reason on this pass I caught it. Every one in my family got it plus my year and half old son. You can't imagine how sick it made people. Recovery took weeks if not months. That was a nasty virus, I can't imagine what the virus of early 20th century was like since they say it was worse.
    Me neither. My family came down with Hong Kong flu when it made its first appearance in '68..........my mother was desperately ill, my dad only slightly less so. I was only nine years old then, but I did the best I could to take care of them, dosing them with aspirin and trying to force fluids, as I'd been taught, to try to get the fever down. I was sick too, and the cough stayed with me for months afterward. I remember wanting so badly for my grandmother to come take care of us, but my father wouldn't hear of it because the flu was so much more dangerous to elderly people. (She never did come down with it---her immune system was legendary---but he was right, and we'd have felt awful if she HAD gotten sick taking care of us.)

    I can still remember how we all crept around the house for weeks, like stricken animals.........both Mother and Dad were too ill to go into town to see the doctor, and there were times I wondered what I'd do if one or both of them should die. Neither did, of course, but looking back I know my mother should've been hospitalized at the very least, because she probably had pneumonia and was delirious much of the time. But we were simple chicken farmers, and we took care of our own, and even though my mother's lungs never totally recovered from the effects of the illness, life eventually got back to normal. My grandmother later said that the Spanish flu hadn't been any worse, symptom-wise, than the Hong Kong strain, although it was definitely more deadly.

    To this day, I believe that was when my asthma got its start, because I never had respiratory issues before the HK flu. It's strange to still be fighting the aftereffects of a long-ago influenza virus and seeing the possibility of a new epidemic more than 40 years later, but if the need arises I'm going to be right there in the trenches, like my grandmother was during the Spanish flu epidemic, taking care of folks regardless of the risk. That's all there is to it.
  4. by   lpnflorida
    I read this morning a 23 month baby died of swine flu in Texas. That is sad. Seems it might be more serious than I first thought it would be.
  5. by   indigo girl
    Swine Flu 2009

    This map is a work in progress. Help mark outbreaks, contact claudinne.r.roe@ugov.gov

    Map Key: click on marker for detail

    Red Marker-Confirmed Case
    Red/Person-Confirmed Death

    Yellow Marker-Case reported in press only
    Yellow/person-Reported death


    http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT...2&source=embed

    This is an interactive map. Direct the arrows, and you can look at the other half of the globe.

    For every case that is marked, there are probably more that were missed. It just seems that things could only get worse if anyone were to be co-infected with both Swine Flu and H5N1. I admit that the cases that concern me most are the ones in the bird flu endemic areas of southeast Asia and Egypt.

    I am also thinking about those cases appearing in the Southern Hemisphere. This disease may disappear from the Northern Hemisphere for the summer but may continue infecting people down there duing their regular flu season. Surely it will co-infect someone who has regular seasonal flu as well. If that seasonal flu is H1N1, it is likely to be Tamiflu resistant. Right now, Swine Flu can be treated with Tamiflu, but for how long will that be effective?
  6. by   indigo girl
    Quote from lpnflorida
    I read this morning a 23 month baby died of swine flu in Texas. That is sad. Seems it might be more serious than I first thought it would be.
    Swine flu: just a statistic

    http://scienceblogs.com/effectmeasur..._statistic.php

    The Editors of Effect Measure are senior public health scientists and practitioners.

    Quote from scienceblogs.com

    The first death in the US from swine flu in a Texas toddler is being widely reported, but a piece just in from Bloomberg says the infection was acquired in Mexico:

    Some of the fear will be lessened by the new knowledge that the baby contracted the disease in another country. The empathy remains, as it should. Mexican babies are still babies, loved by their parents and grandparents even while being hostages to fortune like everyone.

    As this outbreak moves forward we will be barraged by numbers and statistics. This is a form of spectator sport to which we have become accustomed. We follow baseball, the Dow Jones and public opinion polls.

    But these numbers are different. As the late epidemiologist Irving Selikoff once remarked about the horrific toll of asbestos victims, "death statistics are people with the tears wiped away."

    Indeed.
  7. by   Purple_Scrubs
    For those who know more about this than I do...is it possible that this particular strain has been around for much longer than we think? Could some cases of what we thought was "plain old flu" this past fall have actually been swine flu? Could some of the regular season flu deaths been swine flu, and if so how would be know it now?

    I am trying to balance all the hype/hysteria with cold hard facts. As of now I am not any more concerned than I would be from an outbreak of "regular" flu. If we start seeing deaths in the 20-40 population here in the US, I will be more concerned. Any thoughts?
  8. by   indigo girl
    Quote from Purple_Scrubs
    For those who know more about this than I do...is it possible that this particular strain has been around for much longer than we think? Could some cases of what we thought was "plain old flu" this past fall have actually been swine flu? Could some of the regular season flu deaths been swine flu, and if so how would be know it now?

    I am trying to balance all the hype/hysteria with cold hard facts. As of now I am not any more concerned than I would be from an outbreak of "regular" flu. If we start seeing deaths in the 20-40 population here in the US, I will be more concerned. Any thoughts?
    Good point about deaths in the 20 to 40 age group.

    It is hard to sort out what is happening but,if you have the time, all of the questions that you have raised are addressed in a public radio broadcast. It is a two part interview, and very well done, imo. I am more familiar with the first speaker, but the second part of the interview also answered many questions as well.

    I'll let FlaMedic tell you a little more about the program from his blog over at Avian Flu Diary. Seriously, everyone should listen to this broadcast.

    http://afludiary.blogspot.com/2009/0...f-michael.html
  9. by   lamazeteacher
    MB's post quote: "Now, first let me qualify this whole post by saying THAT "if" you are SERIOUSLY sick (IE: fever, chills, rigors, myalgias, massive URI syptoms) then YES, you have no business getting out of bed - BUT what are you to do while out of town???? "

    Thank you for getting your mind set for possible events!

    You'll probably DRINK LOTS OF FLUIDS (not all milk shakes) sleep, read a book you brought - not work related, and watch TV, AFTER YOU GET THE CARE YOU NEED. Your employer should have given you a company credit card, or call to give them your status and ask them to call the hotel manager with the number of one, keeping your medical info private. Better still, take care of that later......

    Even if I wasn't "SERIOUSLY" sick, but had prodromal symptoms:T over 100, or mildly sore throat, rhinitis before congestion, slight HA, muscle aches, etc. I'd act quickly, unless it's midnight. Whatever you do, take action hours before the end of the business day!! If it's after hours, call the ED at an appropriate large, University affiliated hospital - ask the person who answers the 'phone there for information about the size of their facility and
    possible affiliation with a University Medical School or refer you to a larger hospital with University connections.

    Whatever you do, don't go to an "Urgent care, "doc-in-a-box" type place. They probably have no triage, plan or supplies for a pandemic.

    I'd look in the 'phonebook in my room or call the front desk for one to be left outside the room! Look up the nearest hospital (best bet, a University Medical School's one that has a virology lab). Then I would call that hospital, ask for the Infection Control Nurse and ask her what strategy would be best, in her community, for getting Tamiflu or something like that. Hopefully he/she will know about IC doctors' office policies for treating outoftowners.

    I would NOT got to ED or some doctor I found in the yellow pages. The Public Health Department is another possibility, but the average employee
    answering the 'phone there may not give reliable advice. Ask for the Nurse working on Swine Flu cases, in your best professional voice (even though the tendancy when you're not feeling so good, is to regress). Tell him/her what your predicament is (being in a hotel).

    Those people will direct you correctly to an IC doctor where there are good respiratory/droplet isolation practises in use, in case you don't have Swine flu. Then unpack the N95 properly fitted mask in the plastic baggie that you keep with you at all times.......... Wear it wherever you go, no matter what
    the result of your test for swine flu reveals. Wear a hoodie, if you have one and it isn't 90 degrees in the shade, in which case you'll need a wet washcloth in a baggie, to frequently mop your brow with ice water you get from the ice dispenser, in the hallway, into the bucket lined with a plastic bag from your room.

    If your symptoms are getting worse, get yourself any way you can (taxi?) as fast as you can to the place you were told about, for which you've written the address down, and called for the soonest appointment they can give you that day, and taking ice with you, wearing your N95 mask, go for Tamiflu or another similar antiviral, for as often as is recommended. Order lots of fluids from room service when you get back, but ask that the tray is left outside your door after they knock. Think of yourself in a protective bubble.

    When you call the Manager at your hotel/motel, to ask how much longer you can keep your room (perhaps with an innuendo about how great your business is going, and how comfortable you find this particular room), for heavens sake don't scream "I'm dying of Swine flu"! You don't want to contaminate another room!!!!! Say anything you need to, to stay in that room!!!!! There's time enough, when you check out, to recommend to the manager (by telephone) that special disinfective routine is used to cleanse
    your room, as you were diagnosed and treated for Swine flu, while you were there.

    Hopefully you'll never have to implement this information, just take preventive action as the CDC recommends, online!
    Last edit by lamazeteacher on Apr 29, '09 : Reason: typos, clarity
  10. by   cursedandblessed
    just reading around the net, 91 confirmed us cases in 10 states. the little one in texas who died came from mexico to visit family. a marine at 29 palms base has tested positive as well(just on cnn now).
  11. by   mwboswell
    I can't tell if you are being sarcastic or joking or just what....
    I was looking for serious, thought-provoking information/discussion.
  12. by   NurseJanIAm
    i'm very concerned that many acute care facilities aren't taking this seriously enough. i read a crazy article for health care administartors here: http://www.healthleadersmedia.com/co...proactive.html

    it amazes me that instead of taking about the need to do things like having a plan to call in staff, instructing staff when they should come in versus saty home, etc, they're talking about stuff like this:

    patty skoglund, scripps' director of disaster preparedness, advises hospital officials to track the number of flu lab tests and not the number of patient visits, and track costs related to serologic testing of staff and inpatient costs with h1n1 diagnoses. they ultimately may be federally reimbursable, she says.
    they also sound like they view the cdc's info updates as an inconvenience:
    [color=#4a4840]the university of pittsburgh medical center (upmc) is among countless hospitals bracing for a local outbreak of swine flu cases. "we have spent most of our time concentrating on developing the proper communication for staff and physicians," says william smith, senior director of emergency preparedness for upmc. "this has been difficult as the cdc information keeps changing."
    [color=#4a4840]do you all feel like your facilities are being proactive? i'm also really worried about er capacity since ers seem to o on diversion just during normal day-to-day census fluctualtions at baseline!
  13. by   indigo girl
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30398682/

    Do not panic, but the WHO has just raised the Pandemic Threat Level to Phase 5.

    I would suggest that you do some prepping if you have not done so. Be calm, and be practical. What does your family need to have on hand?

    Quote from www.msnbc.msn.com

    WHO Director-General Margaret Chan declared the phase 5 alert after consulting with flu experts from around the world. The decision could lead the global body to recommend additional measures to combat the outbreak, including for vaccine manufacturers to switch production from seasonal flu vaccines to a pandemic vaccine.

    "All countries should immediately now activate their pandemic preparedness plans," Chan told reporters in Geneva. "It really is all of humanity that is under threat in a pandemic."

    A phase 5 alert means there is sustained transmission among people in at least two countries. Once the virus shows effective transmission in two different regions of the world a full pandemic outbreak would be declared.

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