No Prior Existing Conditions but Dead Anyway - page 6

Who would think that a normally healthy woman would die so swiftly from influenza in June? Could you ever have imagined such a thing? No wonder her family and friends are in shock. So why did... Read More

  1. by   CrunchRN
    IG,

    I am having difficulty. Many people here at work ask my advice about the new vaccine when available. I have always advised the seasonal flu shot.

    However, I remember the last time. I was a unit secretary in ICU and I remember the guillane-B cases........

    What are you advising people who ask about the new vaccine for when it may be avaialable?

    And may I ask what you persoonally intend with regard to the new vaccine?

    Thanks so much.
  2. by   indigo girl
    Quote from CrunchRN
    IG,

    I am having difficulty. Many people here at work ask my advice about the new vaccine when available. I have always advised the seasonal flu shot.

    However, I remember the last time. I was a unit secretary in ICU and I remember the guillane-B cases........

    What are you advising people who ask about the new vaccine for when it may be avaialable?

    And may I ask what you persoonally intend with regard to the new vaccine?

    Thanks so much.
    I don't give medical advice, of course.

    I can only give out what information is currently available on the new vaccines. As with anything we put into our bodies, you have to weigh benefit against risks. For those with a prior existing health problem such as pregnancy or lung disease, this pandemic virus could result in a fatal outcome for some but not all.

    There is no way to know who will become seriously ill, and who will be able to recover without any intervention. Most people will be able to get through the infection feeling very sick but eventually do return to homeostatsis. Just having a seasonal influenza can just about incapacitate you for a period of time, however, because that is the nature of influenza infection, never anything to take lightly.

    I was born prior to 1956 so I may be less likely to have a less serious infection due to some prior existing immunity, so the thinking goes. Also I may have already had my brush with the virus when I had a serious case of conjunctivitis and general malaise 2 weeks ago. But, I am an asthmatic and that does increase risk for serious complications. Too bad I won't be able to get anyone to check me for antibodies! That would help me in my decision making process.

    As we are all aware, this will be an untried vaccine, and that is making many uncomfortable. The clinical trials will be done, but on fewer people than we might like. It is likely that the full range of possible effects will not be known until after many, many people have already received the vaccine. There is no getting around this. It is just the way the situation is, we will likely be part of one of the largest clinical trials in history.

    Our biggest reason as HCW for getting the vaccine is to protect our patients from us. And, to keep us at our posts when the public is getting sick, so that the very sickest can come to us for care. It does take time to get those antibodies however, and our flu season will most likely have already started before much of this proposed vaccine will be available. There are already cases occurring in our communities but nothing like what is probably going to happen this fall when the flu season returns.

    I am still considering all of the pros and cons, myself. I am hoping that this will be a very safe and effective vaccine. I know that my risk factor with the virus is considerable due to reactive airway disease.

    Have I covered everything? LOL! At any rate, I don't belong in the no prior exisitng conditions thread because I definitely do have a health problem. I'm just not dead yet but I could be!!
    Last edit by indigo girl on Jul 30, '09
  3. by   CrunchRN
    Thank you so much for that incredibly thoughtful calrification. I don't give medical advice either, but I do a lot of health teaching ( and BP monitoring atc...) for the researchers and tell them the pros and cons in these matters.

    I have a researcher I am friends with and she has asthma also. She goes from fine to in big trouble very quickly so I have been discussing those pros and cons with her and that reinforces what I am telling her. I also made sure she saw a pulmonologist this summer to fine tune her regimen which was outdated.

    I just caught the tail end of a news story no NBC last night...... I think they said that in late pregnancy it is a 50% mortality rate for mom? Have you heard that? I sure hope they said 15 and not 50..............
  4. by   indigo girl
    Nevada

    http://www.kvbc.com/Global/story.asp?S=10818183

    Quote from www.kvbc.com

    The death toll in Clark County due to the swine flu is now up to five people.

    There has been a total of two deaths this week: a 35-year-old woman the health district says had no underlying medical conditions, and a 73-year-old man who was dealing with other medical conditions.

    The health district does confirm that the number of H1N1 cases have been dropping.
  5. by   indigo girl
    British School Girl in Greece

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti....html?ITO=1490

    She is still alive but in very bad shape exacerbated by not getting treated early enough. Why would her parents let this go for 8 days before seeking treatment? What were they thinking?

    Quote from www.dailymail.co.uk

    Natasha Newman, 16, a pupil at Gordonstoun public school, is on a life-support machine after suffering lung damage and other complications.

    The schoolgirl's battle comes are the government revealed the number of swine flu cases 'may have plateaued', with 110,000 new cases in England last week.

    The data represent a 10% rise on the 100,000 new cases estimated in the previous weeks.

    Natasha was admitted to hospital on the island of Cephalonia, but after her condition deteriorated and she lost consciousness she was flown to the country's main children's hospital in Athens on Tuesday.

    Doctors at Ayia Sofia Hospital say Natasha had swine flu for at least eight days before seeking help.
    Her parents Julian Newman, a businessman, and Nikki Broughton, a theatrical agent, were at her bedside.
    Mr Newman said: 'Natasha is very bad. She had chronic respiratory failure. She has complications like pneumonia.'

    Dr Lina Sianidou, head of the intensive care unit, said: 'There is no doubt that she is suffering from swine flu. She is in a critical condition and very much struggling.
    'It is clear she had this new virus for at least eight days before she sought help and that has made her condition worse.'

    Natasha is believed to have developed a dangerously high temperature and severe breathing difficulties, before losing consciousness.

    The family live in Highgate, north London, but Miss Newman is a pupil at prestigious Gordonstoun public school in Elgin, Scotland, where Prince Charles attended.

    Natasha, a keen musician, flew out to Cephalonia three weeks ago with her family for a month-long holiday. She is not believed to have any underlying health problems.

    She is one of three swine flu victims in intensive care in Greece, authorities revealed yesterday. News of her condition sparked panic on Cephalonia, where doctors at the General Prefectural Hospital in Argostoli refused to treat her. Officials have tried to play down publicity in her case over fears it could spread more panic in a country where tourists have been blamed for spreading the virus.
  6. by   lamazeteacher
    Quote from indigogirl's quote from the "Mail", in her post #69

    "Her parents Julian Newman, a businessman, and Nikki Broughton, a theatrical agent, were at her bedside. Mr Newman said: 'Natasha is very bad. She had chronic respiratory failure. She has complications like pneumonia.'

    Dr Lina Sianidou, head of the intensive care unit, said: 'There is no doubt that she is suffering from swine flu. She is in a critical condition and very much struggling. 'It is clear she had this new virus for at least eight days before she sought help and that has made her condition worse.'

    Her parents Julian Newman, a businessman, and Nikki Broughton, a theatrical agent, were at her bedside. Mr Newman said: 'Natasha is very bad. She had chronic respiratory failure. She has complications like pneumonia.'

    Dr Lina Sianidou, head of the intensive care unit, said: 'There is no doubt that she is suffering from swine flu. She is in a critical condition and very much struggling. 'It is clear she had this new virus for at least eight days before she sought help and that has made her condition worse.'

    -.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-

    Now I know reading between the lines is tantamount to making stuff up, but this could have been the scenario: What I got from the quote of Mr. Newman, a businessman (so possibly using "chronic" inadvisably), is that his daughter was probably having respiratory problems on vacation, which the family has seen many times before, and they may have had her use the medications brought from England. It could account for her 8 days without medical care on the small island in Greece, that the medication was doing its job. However the infectious process overwhelmed her, and she lost consciousness. I imagine her condition is so unstable, that transfer back to England would worsen her situation (and give medical care in Athens a "black eye")......

    Parents get very strange in denial, which I usually describe in advance to prenatal classes, according to Elizabeth Kubler-Ross's "Steps to Crisis" - shock, denial, bargaining, depression-anger, and when you finally reach acceptance it's a good thing. They need to know if their baby has any problem (even the first "cold"), that these steps are normal adjustments to untoward situations. They have to overcome denial, to get medical care appropriately. Some have told me years later, that they remembered me saying that, when their child became very ill.

    It's a shame that their daughter was so ill, far from home. In that the smaller islands in Greece are fairly isolated, therefore usually not crowded, but it is vacation time, and possibly a cruise ship arriving with many people who were crowded together.........

    This is a preview of what may come! I remember the summers during the polio epidemic in the '50s. Children were kept at home, movie theatres, public pools, and crowded restaurants (we didn't have covered malls, then) were closed. In 1957, when I began my nursing education, we still had patients in "iron lungs" at the "Infectious Disease Hospitals", where I spent 8 weeks nursing sickened Eskimos with polio, who were brought to Montreal. We are so fortunate these days, that a vaccine for H1N1 was made and can be mass produced, so quickly. Go take it ASAP available, y'all - but pregnant women first, then those with "preexisting" conditions!!! Save your money for it!!

    When our new medical system is in place, the cost of care for those who would be critically ill, hospitalized and uninsured, will be averted. Your representatives in congress need your affirmative emails, to bring this about quickly!!!! Today's the day, seize it, they're going away for a month Friday.
    Last edit by lamazeteacher on Jul 30, '09 : Reason: separate quote from post, accent portions
  7. by   indigo girl
    Possibly, you are correct, but they did not say the word asthma, and the article did saythat she was not believed to have prior health conditions. Asthma is a hugh risk factor with swine flu, of course.

    Bad reporting? Maybe. But, good pick up, lamaze. You are pretty sharp!
  8. by   lamazeteacher
    I agree about the bad reporting, as it must have been translated from Greek.
  9. by   indigo girl
    Quote from lamazeteacher
    I agree about the bad reporting, as it must have been translated from Greek.
    Yes, it was certainly Greek to me!
  10. by   CrunchRN
  11. by   indigo girl
    Chile

    http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/20...t_11649731.htm

    Quote from news.xinhuanet.com

    Chilean health authorities on Friday reported two newly-confirmed A/H1N1 flu deaths, which brought the country's overall flu-related deaths to 19, out of a total of 7,342 infections.

    One of the victims, a 36-year-old student paramedical technician, was viewed as an unusual case, because he did not have any pre-existing conditions. He died of pneumonia after being hospitalized on June 28 in the Conception Regional Hospital, where he had been doing his medical practice.
    (hat tip flutrackers/dutchy)
  12. by   indigo girl
    Carmichael, California

    http://www.sacbee.com/ourregion/story/2071046.html

    I am afraid that her only prior existing condition was HCW.

    Quote from www.sacbee.com

    A cancer nurse at Mercy San Juan Medical Center in Carmichael has died of the H1N1 flu, becoming the first reported health care worker in California killed by the new variant of swine flu.
    "We're very concerned that a nurse died," said Jill Furillo of the California Nurses Association, adding that the death underscores the need for strong infection controls to protect nurses and patients.

    Mercy San Juan does not know whether the nurse caught the flu on the job or elsewhere, but it has notified all patients who came in contact with her when she might have been infectious, said hospital spokesman Bryan Gardner.

    Karen Ann Hays died July 17 of a severe respiratory infection, pneumonia and H1N1, according to her death certificate. She also had methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a staph infection that is resistant to many antibiotics.

    Hays, 51, was a triathlete, skydiver and marathon runner - and a mom who could listen for hours to minute details of video games that any other adult would tune out, said her 19-year-old son Ian Hays.
  13. by   indigo girl
    More info on the case in post #68 in Nevada:

    http://www.lvrj.com/news/52169192.html

    Quote from www.lvrj.com/news

    A few days after experiencing flulike symptoms, 34-year-old Sabrina Gibson phoned an ambulance from her workplace.

    Within days, she was unconscious. She spent the next two months in the intensive care unit at Valley Hospital Medical Center, barely speaking, hooked up to monitors as her 35th birthday passed.

    On July 24, after being diagnosed with the H1N1 virus and suffering massive internal bleeding and lung failure, she died.

    "It took two weeks before they determined if she had the swine flu, and they cured her of that," said her father, 67-year-old Thomas Wilson, on Thursday. "But by that point, the damage had been done."

    Gibson was one of two people to have died in the past week after contracting the H1N1 virus. She had no underlying medical conditions.

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