No Prior Existing Conditions but Dead Anyway - page 18

Who would think that a normally healthy woman would die so swiftly from influenza in June? Could you ever have imagined such a thing? No wonder her family and friends are in shock. So why did... Read More

  1. by   indigo girl
    Cocoa resident 5th in Brevard to die from swine flu

    http://www.floridatoday.com/article/...from+swine+flu

    Quote from www.floridatoday.com
    A 46-year-old Cocoa man is the fifth local person to die of swine flu, the Brevard County Health Department reported Monday.

    Donald Athman was vacationing in San Diego when he became ill. He died Nov. 9 at a hospital there, according to Dr. Heidar Heshmati, Brevard health director.

    Heshmati said Athman, who was single, was in good health when he left.
    (hat tip pfi/pixie)
  2. by   indigo girl
    Altha, Florida

    http://www.thecountyrecord.net/archi...Altha-man.html

    He seems to be saying that a cytokine storm event took place. In not so many words, your healthy
    immune system's massive response to the virus is what can do you in.
    Explained further here: https://allnurses.com/pandemic-flu-f...rs-441405.html

    Quote from www.thecountyrecord.net

    Marcus Dale Whiddon, 25, passed away Friday at Bay Medical Center. According to the Calhoun County Health Department, he died of complications from the H1N1 virus.

    In a young healthy person who hasn't encountered a similar virus, their immune system tries to attack H1N1 on it's own with a vengeance. Dr. Charbonneau compared it to a military attack - you go in to kill the enemy, but wipe out a lot of good stuff in the process. And when your system is recovering after the attack, complications can develop.

    "[Whiddon] was a strong, husky guy and he had a strong, husky immune system and that's ultimately what will kill people with this," says Dr. Charbonneau.
    (hat tip pfi/aurora)
  3. by   CrunchRN
    Interesting information.

    Things seem to have quieted here. Less people and their kids sick at work. No deaths on the news for the last week.

    They announced today that the H1N1 vaccine is available free to anyone that wants it.

    I wonder if it will recur during the usual flu high season in late december/January?
  4. by   indigo girl
    Quote from CrunchRN
    Interesting information.

    Things seem to have quieted here. Less people and their kids sick at work. No deaths on the news for the last week.

    They announced today that the H1N1 vaccine is available free to anyone that wants it.

    I wonder if it will recur during the usual flu high season in late december/January?
    It seems to have peaked in certain areas, is what I am reading. However, they are expecting a third wave after the holidays. There are still many, many susceptible hosts, and as long as there are, this is likely to continue. We need lots of herd immunity, but we don't have it yet. People are still waiting for vaccine availabilty in some place unlike where you are. My best friend in Pennsylvania had to drive an hour away to Reading to get her little kid the Flumist. She still has to get him the second dose and an injection for herself. It was not available for her as she is not considered high risk.

    This may just be the calm before the storm or maybe not. Who knows? Flu is unpredictable. In the meantime, I am reading Alan Sipress's well researched new book, The Fatal Strain. I now fully understand why virologists are very worried about the swine flu and bird flu mixing. If people knew just how uncontrolled the bird flu situation is, they would all be begging the govt to create a vaccine for H5N1 like now already. If that virus gains increased transmissibility there will be no stopping it for all of Asia is already infected but lying about it. They have been covering this up for almost 10 years. No wonder that virus is making its way thru Europe and African. You can expect
    those govts to keep it under wraps as much as possible as well. Flu outbreaks are always political situations a WHO official privately admitted to Sipress.
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 2, '09
  5. by   CrunchRN
    I was wondering about the mixing issue just the other day. There seems to be no press about bird flu any more and I would bet most people think it is a non issue.......
  6. by   indigo girl
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I was wondering about the mixing issue just the other day. There seems to be no press about bird flu any more and I would bet most people think it is a non issue.......
    No doubt that they do think it is not an issue just as all of those countries that looked the other way while milions of poultry became infected in their countries, hoped it was not an issue either. The Vietnamese govt knew for two years that the disease was in their country, and did nothing until finally the first human deaths started to occur.
    They could have acted, and they chose not to for economic reasons. We may
    someday have to pay the price for this failure to respond.

    They have all done too little, too late. It is now impossible to stop the spread except in limited ways. This is likely the biggest biological threat of a lifetime. Will it happen? There is no way to tell at this point, and anyone that pretends any different is just giving an unsubstantiated opinion.

    I will still be following what information is available. Much of it is translated, and when we hear of suspected cases especially in Indonesia, we seldom learn of the outcome. One thing is certain. There will be human cases because the wild birds as well as the poultry are frequently infected.

    https://allnurses.com/pandemic-flu-f...ed-412461.html
  7. by   indigo girl
    West Sussex, UK

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/e...ex/8391458.stm

    Nine years old, and healthy prior to this...

    Quote from news.bbc.co.uk
    Health chiefs in West Sussex have now confirmed that the schoolgirl's death was linked to the H1N1 flu virus.
    Her mother Sharon Boor said Brittany had been fit and healthy and urged people to take up the swine flu jab.
    She said: "Brittany didn't have any underlying conditions and wasn't in an at risk group for swine flu.
    (hat tip pfi/homebody)
  8. by   indigo girl
    Chicago, Illinois

    http://www.loyolaphoenix.com/2.541/n...eable-1.951024

    Quote from www.loyolaphoenix.com
    On Nov. 10, Greable's heart slipped into an arrhythmia, which caused a short circuit in his brain. His death came unexpectedly. He never had any prior heart condition and aside from the fact that he was recovering from the flu, Greable was healthy.
    Greable had been working on his L.L.M. (Masters of Law) at Loyola Law School for more than one year. Though he already had his J.D. from Case Western Reserve University, Greable was attending Loyola to specialize in healthcare law.
    (hat tip pif/homebody)
  9. by   imintrouble
    I work in a very small rural hospital in Illinois. As far as I know we've had no cases of H1N1 except one. We did have a 40 something obese male with a hx of resp. problems. He was admitted with Asthma exacerbation. He was a frequent flyer, and actually looked better than usual on this admission. Less than 36 hrs later he was in the ICU, on a ventilator, too critical to fly out. He was stabilized and flown to a larger hospital where he died. The other hospital tested for H1N1 and he was positive. We are a very small hospital, don't routinely see many critical young pts. I have been a nurse for 15 yrs and have NEVER seen someone young go down that fast.
  10. by   indigo girl
    Quote from TLH Terry
    I work in a very small rural hospital in Illinois. As far as I know we've had no cases of H1N1 except one. We did have a 40 something obese male with a hx of resp. problems. He was admitted with Asthma exacerbation. He was a frequent flyer, and actually looked better than usual on this admission. Less than 36 hrs later he was in the ICU, on a ventilator, too critical to fly out. He was stabilized and flown to a larger hospital where he died. The other hospital tested for H1N1 and he was positive. We are a very small hospital, don't routinely see many critical young pts. I have been a nurse for 15 yrs and have NEVER seen someone young go down that fast.
    I hear you. Our most frequent flyer (over 80 ED visits/year) was discharged from our unit (psych), and only 2 days later ended up in ICU where she died of complications of H1N1. It was quick and overwhelming.
  11. by   indigo girl
    St. Paul, Minnesota

    http://www.startribune.com/lifestyle...PQLanchO7DiUss

    He survived despite cytokine storm possibly because they had access to the new drug, Peramivir.

    Quote from www.startribune.com
    Kim Lange's son was still coherent when the doctor said it was time to put him on a ventilator. He was as stoic as he could be -- a 23-year-old who had never been sick. But the look of terror in his eyes as he looked up from the hospital bed tore her heart.

    "He said, 'Worst- case scenario, huh, Mom?' '' Lange recalled. "And I fell apart.''

    On Monday he went to the doctor, who told him he had pneumonia and sent him home with pills. On Tuesday, when his temperature hit 104 degrees, his mom took him to the emergency room, where he got intravenous fluids and more pills. On Wednesday he went back to the doctor, who called an ambulance to take him from the clinic in Forest Lake to United Hospital in St. Paul. An ambulance? Kim Lange was shocked.
    (hat tip pfi/pixie)
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 7, '09
  12. by   indigo girl
    DeKalb County, Illinois

    http://www.suburbanchicagonews.com/g...120609.article

    Quote from www.suburbanchicagonews.com
    On Oct. 18, Donald Franklin Dyer, 16 years old, student at Sandwich High School, became the first person in DeKalb County infected with the H1N1 virus to die. But before he did, he spent 58 days in the hospital, hooked up to machines that helped him breathe and taking medications to help him fight off pneumonia.

    "He told us there was nothing more he could do," Michael said. "He had never once said that before. I always had a feeling Donald would get through this, but when he said that, I knew."

    Donald Dyer died later that day, just a few days after his 16th birthday. The DeKalb County Health Department, while not confirming Dyer's identity, said there were no underlying conditions in his death, which was related to an H1N1 infection.
    (hat tip pfi/aurora)
    Last edit by indigo girl on Dec 8, '09
  13. by   indigo girl
    Braceville Township, Ohio

    http://www.vindy.com/news/2009/dec/0...ily/?newswatch

    Quote from www.vindy.com
    “He just said, ‘I’m not feeling very well,’” she remembers. Three days later, he had a fever of 103 and went to a doctor, who advised him to take Motrin and Tylenol and rest.

    She never dreamed that her husband would die from H1N1.

    “He didn’t smoke. He was healthy,” she said. “My husband was 44 years old. I didn’t think he had anything to worry about.”
    (hat tip pfi/Ree)

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