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Dealing with teachers

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by SassyTachyRN SassyTachyRN (Member)

SassyTachyRN has 4 years experience and specializes in Peds, Oncology.

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MrNurse(x2) has 28 years experience as a ADN and specializes in IMC, school nursing.

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35 minutes ago, CanIcallmymom said:

I have one that does this too, drives me nuts! I always say, "Oh, was your teacher a nurse before they became a teacher?!"

I've known a lot of teachers who became RN's. Can't imagine the change in schedule they had to get used to.

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CanIcallmymom has 4 years experience.

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1 hour ago, MrNurse(x2) said:

I've known a lot of teachers who became RN's. Can't imagine the change in schedule they had to get used to.

Gosh, me neither! I know many previous teacher RN's too. I don't know any RNs that ventured into teaching in schools though--universities/junior colleges for sure though.

Edited by CanIcallmymom

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On 11/20/2018 at 1:39 PM, scout mom said:

I don't know how many times a day I hear "My teacher told me to come get an ice pack. My teacher told me that I need my temperature checked. My teacher told me ________________."

 

 I get annoyed when kids say things like this because I am trying to teach them how to communicate their needs clearly, and these types of statements make them a passive non-participant in their health. More likely, they were complaining of pain and the teacher said "you should see the nurse for an ice pack or something." When they blame their visit on their teacher I always have a lot of follow-up questions like "what were you doing that made your teacher say that?" etc. 

 

I do have one teacher in particular that sends kids for Tylenol. Another thing I'm working with kids on is trying non-pharm interventions before using tylenol/ibu, so it really annoys me when they come in and say "Mrs Soandso sent me up for some Tylenol." No. 

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17 hours ago, jnemartin said:

 I get annoyed when kids say things like this because I am trying to teach them how to communicate their needs clearly, and these types of statements make them a passive non-participant in their health. More likely, they were complaining of pain and the teacher said "you should see the nurse for an ice pack or something." When they blame their visit on their teacher I always have a lot of follow-up questions like "what were you doing that made your teacher say that?" etc. 

 

I do have one teacher in particular that sends kids for Tylenol. Another thing I'm working with kids on is trying non-pharm interventions before using tylenol/ibu, so it really annoys me when they come in and say "Mrs Soandso sent me up for some Tylenol." No. 

I have become legendary at the middle school & high school for asking kids complaining of a headache "what have you eaten today?".  9 times out of 10, their answer is "nothing".  Crackers & peanut butter or cheese for you! I even made the high school's newspaper for "things teachers say" - with the writer stating "you could break a leg & the first thing she's going to ask is "what have you eaten today?'". Surprised them when I said - no, that would be about second or third down the list, because if you need surgery for that leg, the anesthesiologist needs to know.  Lol

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kidzcare has 5 years experience.

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1 hour ago, mombat1 said:

I have become legendary at the middle school & high school for asking kids complaining of a headache "what have you eaten today?".  9 times out of 10, their answer is "nothing".  Crackers & peanut butter or cheese for you! I even made the high school's newspaper for "things teachers say" - with the writer stating "you could break a leg & the first thing she's going to ask is "what have you eaten today?'". Surprised them when I said - no, that would be about second or third down the list, because if you need surgery for that leg, the anesthesiologist needs to know.  Lol

I love this! You've made an impression on the students and they will remember it!

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On 10/31/2013 at 7:05 AM, RNlove17 said:

I've had to do so much education (aka damage control lol). They are also shocked we don't send letters.

 

I've had about half a dozen confirmed cases of strep this year (with a total student body of about 300). When the parents call to let the school know their kid is out with strep this is usually how my notification goes:

Front desk lady: Mrs Soandso called to say LD has strep, so I don't know if you want to send a letter out to parents, or....

Me: Ok, thanks for letting me know. 

Front desk lady: Should I tell his teachers?

Me: NO! 

lol. The first time this happened, I tried to educate her about reporting requirements, but I finally just gave up. 

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2 hours ago, mombat1 said:

I have become legendary at the middle school & high school for asking kids complaining of a headache "what have you eaten today?".  9 times out of 10, their answer is "nothing".  Crackers & peanut butter or cheese for you! I even made the high school's newspaper for "things teachers say" - with the writer stating "you could break a leg & the first thing she's going to ask is "what have you eaten today?'". Surprised them when I said - no, that would be about second or third down the list, because if you need surgery for that leg, the anesthesiologist needs to know.  Lol

This is great! When kids come to me with c/o HA I ask what they've eaten, where is their water bottle/how much have they drank today, what class are they in, etc. For almost all of the middle schoolers, I will advise them to drink a bottle of water, move their desk from under the overhead lamps, and eat lunch or a snack (if it's around lunch time), or if it's near the end of the day I remind them that they are almost done and I have faith they can make it.

Maybe one or two have ever come back to re-complain of HA after I give these instructions. NOT because I believe they have followed my instructions and they have helped, but because I believe the c/o HA was not a true concern to begin with... that is really why I avoid quickly giving prn OTCs (we are allowed a small list of pre-approved meds with consents from parents) 

 

I trust HS kids more and they don't tend to ask for meds unless they need them, so I will dispense more quickly but also give the instructions for self-care. 

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Recently had to send a kiddo back with a note stating, "The fact that you feel Little Timmy's pant legs are too big does not constitute a medical emergency. Nor does the fact that Susie was wearing lipstick this morning, the broken backpack zipper from this morning, or the jacket you requested that I give to a child ALREADY WEARING A JACKET. Let's all try to use our adult judgement the rest of today, shall we?"

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