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Curiosity Killed the Cat and Got 50 Hospital Employees Fired

Nurses Article   (15,726 Views 60 Replies 632 Words)
by Lorie Brown RN, MN, JD Lorie Brown RN, MN, JD (Advice Column) Writer Expert Verified

Lorie Brown RN, MN, JD has 30 years experience .

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At Chicago’s Northwestern Hospital, Jussie Smollett, an actor from the TV series “Empire,” was admitted after he was physically attacked. According to reports, he suffered bruises and facial lacerations. You are reading page 4 of Curiosity Killed the Cat and Got 50 Hospital Employees Fired. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

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There was a situation at Wrongway Regional Medical Center were an ancillary employee coded on the medical side. Several employees from the psych division looked up the deceased employee's file, one being an interim supervisor.

Wrongway administration dealt with it by slapping some wrists and making it where the medical and psych computer systems wouldn't be able to communicate.

It's a real bummer because we regularly transfer patients back and forth.

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

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12 hours ago, Rose_Queen said:

 All are entitled to the exact same privacy.

Okay, but here's theoretical situation: Say someone's life stance is as an devoted exhibitionist. HIPAA interferes with that individual's right by enforcing privacy on them. The Supreme Court has ruled that an individual's life stance carries the same weight as another's religious beliefs.

Wouldn't HIPAA be interfering in an individual's constitution right to freely practice their religious belief of exhibitionism by enforcing privacy upon them?

Anybody know?

Is there a lawyer in the house?

 

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Emergent has 25 years experience.

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2 hours ago, Davey Do said:

Okay, but here's theoretical situation: Say someone's life stance is as an devoted exhibitionist. HIPAA interferes with that individual's right by enforcing privacy on them. The Supreme Court has ruled that an individual's life stance carries the same weight as another's religious beliefs.

Wouldn't HIPAA be interfering in an individual's constitution right to freely practice their religious belief of exhibitionism by enforcing privacy upon them?

Anybody know?

Is there a lawyer in the house?

 

Or how about someone whose life stance is irrepressible curiosity!? Shouldn't the workplace accommodate that? It might be covered under the ADA!

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and specializes in Psych, CD, HH, Admin, LTC, OR, ER, Med Surge.

15 Followers; 1 Article; 6,341 Posts; 77,864 Profile Views

24 minutes ago, Emergent said:

Or how about someone whose life stance is irrepressible curiosity!? Shouldn't the workplace accommodate that? It might be covered under the ADA!

Devoted Exhibitionists and Irrepressible Curiosity Seekers (DE/ICS) unite!

Rage against the HIPAA Machine!

I want to be able to read my name in the newspaper under "Admissions" like in the Good Ol' Days!

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Asystole RN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy.

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6 hours ago, Davey Do said:

Okay, but here's theoretical situation: Say someone's life stance is as an devoted exhibitionist. HIPAA interferes with that individual's right by enforcing privacy on them. The Supreme Court has ruled that an individual's life stance carries the same weight as another's religious beliefs.

Wouldn't HIPAA be interfering in an individual's constitution right to freely practice their religious belief of exhibitionism by enforcing privacy upon them?

Anybody know?

Is there a lawyer in the house?

 

The RFRA (Religious Freedom Restoration Act) of 1993 upholds the Federal Government's right to "significantly burden" someone's religious needs so as long as the government has a substantial interest in doing so. HIPAA would likely fall into the category of substantial interest. 

There have been many back and forth cases on a state and federal level from the bakers in Colorado to the marriage license clerk that have had input into the RFRA and the state level of the same law. 

Overall there seems to be a balance. The federal government can overrule religious needs  when compelled to do so but it cannot compel an individual to act against their religion. That individual can either be removed or recuse themselves from the conflict should they be unable to uphold their duties. 

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I access charts of patients that aren't mine all the time. It almost always occurs when I am at the nursing station. For example, the dietary aid cannot find the nurse so he/she wants to know if the patient's NPO status was actually discontinued. Sometimes a doctor cannot find his/her patient, so I go in the chart to see if the nurse dropped a note about the patient leaving the unit for a test. Should I stop these practices? I know I am not doing anything wrong, but in 10 years if a judge asked me why I went into that patient's chart if I wasn't assigned to that patient, there is no way I would remember why I did in the first place.

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Lorie Brown RN, MN, JD has 30 years experience.

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43 minutes ago, LM NY said:

I access charts of patients that aren't mine all the time. It almost always occurs when I am at the nursing station. For example, the dietary aid cannot find the nurse so he/she wants to know if the patient's NPO status was actually discontinued. Sometimes a doctor cannot find his/her patient, so I go in the chart to see if the nurse dropped a note about the patient leaving the unit for a test. Should I stop these practices? I know I am not doing anything wrong, but in 10 years if a judge asked me why I went into that patient's chart if I wasn't assigned to that patient, there is no way I would remember why I did in the first place.

As long as you access the chart for a legitimate reason pertaining to the patient's healthcare, that is fine.  Check with your risk manager about putting in an entry "accessed chart to find dietary order for dietary aid" or " accessed chart to notify physician of patient's whereabouts"

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Many moons ago, I worked on a women's health unit, inside a large hospital.  On our sister unit, L&D, we had a very bad outcome with an older doc, and a stillborn.  Many thought it could have been avoided.

Our house sup came up and told everyone --  DO NOT LOOK AT ANYTHING.  NOT THE STRIPS, NOT THE CHART, NADA, ZIPPO, ZILCH.

Well, three nurses thought, "they won't know" and looked through the chart and strips anyway.

Fired in less than 12 hours.

 

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Daisy4RN has 20 years experience and specializes in Travel, Home Health, Med-Surg.

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1 hour ago, Lorie Brown RN, MN, JD said:

As long as you access the chart for a legitimate reason pertaining to the patient's healthcare, that is fine.  Check with your risk manager about putting in an entry "accessed chart to find dietary order for dietary aid" or " accessed chart to notify physician of patient's whereabouts"

I have never seen this anywhere. Do you mean a specific place to chart that or just put a nursing note. Where I work I also "look" at patients charts for various reasons and like the other poster would not remember in 10 yrs (or probably even 10 days)

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ocean.baby has 25 years experience and specializes in corrections and LTC.

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On 3/15/2019 at 4:53 PM, Jedrnurse said:

But, but, there's a terrible nursing shortage. Haven't you heard?

It depends on where you live.  I live in Wyoming, and there 'is' a terrible nursing shortage here.  I only wish I lived in a state where there isn't a nursing shortage, or wish some of those nurses would move here.  

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