CRNA job alternatives

Posted
by Ketofol Ketofol (New) New Nurse Student

I'm a SRNA just starting my 3rd year (Senior year). Despite having amazing grades and solid clinical sites/experience, I feel as though I am not where I should be. I believe most of my class is ahead of me and simple physical tasks are huge hurdles for me (which they shouldn't be in Senior year). I still struggle with mask ventilation (also im useless in breaking a laryngospasm with positive pressure!), my intubations are sometimes successful but Rough and not smooth, LMA insertions are 50/50 but haven't gotten good enough that I can insert them from the side if needed (HOB turned away), and still don't have a solid work flow down, leading to accomplishing tasks too slow for quick surgeries.....I realize that regardless of my hardwork and persistence, I don't have the "IT" factor and what's required. IF I make it thru school, I feel I probably should stay away from the OR considering my inability...does anyone know any non-patient careers you can do as a CRNA. It's unfortunate because I love Anesthesia, but after hundreds of attempts I realize it's not in the cards for me.

Edited by Ketofol

sleepwalker

sleepwalker, MSN, NP

Specializes in Occupational Health. Has 18 years experience. 331 Posts

I would focus on completing the program....this is something to consider after you complete your program and obtain your certification. 

IMHO...you're too far along now to quit and incur all that debt for nothing. Continue to move forward and focus on doing as well as you can. 

PaSSiNGaS

PaSSiNGaS, MSN

Specializes in Nurse Anesthesiology. Has 17 years experience. 261 Posts

Everything you mentioned you are struggling with are tasks and procedures. I tell SRNAs all the time I could care less how great they are at placing an Aline or getting the best grade I view during intubation.  This stuff will come with practice and the more you do the better you will be.  

The more important things you should worry about is being competent at knowing the WHY about all those things.  Why do you need to intubate or place a CVC or what happens if there are complications from something.  Understanding the why and what to do with complications is much more important to know at your stage then actually being a master at placing a LMA.

matthewandrew, NP

Specializes in Family Nursing & Psychiatry. Has 10 years experience. 372 Posts

Something to consider is pain management. 

offlabel

offlabel

1,396 Posts

If what you are concerned about is actually reflected by the reality (we're our own worst judges) you do have an ethical duty to either achieve more than competency before entering practice or get more training. The good news is you've got another year. And if you're clinical instructors and program administrators don't agree with your less than optimistic view point, maybe you're being too hard on yourself. Talk with them, take the advice your clinical instructors are giving you and be completely forthcoming in what you see as your weaknesses with them. 

As a clinical instructor myself, I think my biggest frustration is a shortcoming that is easily over come, but for whatever reason the SRNA is simply unwilling to put my advice/direction to use. Sort of a 'thanks, but I'll work this out on my own' type of attitude. 

Tegridy

Tegridy

Specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-3. 409 Posts

I would be more worried about those who do not know their limitations than those who do even if they might be having areas of struggle. You have another year and no-one is "perfect" at their role right out of school.

offlabel

offlabel

1,396 Posts

On 9/17/2021 at 2:12 AM, matthewandrew said:

Something to consider is pain management. 

Pain management is a frequent 'default' fall back alternative for both medical and nursing anesthesia trainees that are questioning their choice of sub-specialty. It is horrible advice. Pain is a very specific sub-specialty that just happens to have crossover skills in anesthesia but is in another galaxy in terms of clinical expertise, knowledge base and medical emphasis. It is far more suited to someone interested in internal/general medicine than anesthesia. Anyone can learn to put a needle in a certain spot. Monkey skill. To suggest it as a 'bail out' from anesthesia is professional suicide. 

Tegridy

Tegridy

Specializes in Former NP now Internal medicine PGY-3. 409 Posts

2 hours ago, offlabel said:

Pain management is a frequent 'default' fall back alternative for both medical and nursing anesthesia trainees that are questioning their choice of sub-specialty. It is horrible advice. Pain is a very specific sub-specialty that just happens to have crossover skills in anesthesia but is in another galaxy in terms of clinical expertise, knowledge base and medical emphasis. It is far more suited to someone interested in internal/general medicine than anesthesia. Anyone can learn to put a needle in a certain spot. Monkey skill. To suggest it as a 'bail out' from anesthesia is professional suicide. 

This person is probably doing fine and just stressing. The heroic gunners are the ones to worry about!

Driven4Success

Driven4Success

Specializes in SRNA. Has 8 years experience. 4 Posts

On 1/1/2022 at 6:30 AM, Tegridy said:

I would be more worried about those who do not know their limitations than those who do even if they might be having areas of struggle. You have another year and no-one is "perfect" at their role right out of school.

True

subee, MSN, CRNA

Specializes in CRNA, Finally retired. Has 50 years experience. 4,139 Posts

On 8/9/2021 at 9:58 PM, Ketofol said:

I'm a SRNA just starting my 3rd year (Senior year). Despite having amazing grades and solid clinical sites/experience, I feel as though I am not where I should be. I believe most of my class is ahead of me and simple physical tasks are huge hurdles for me (which they shouldn't be in Senior year). I still struggle with mask ventilation (also im useless in breaking a laryngospasm with positive pressure!), my intubations are sometimes successful but Rough and not smooth, LMA insertions are 50/50 but haven't gotten good enough that I can insert them from the side if needed (HOB turned away), and still don't have a solid work flow down, leading to accomplishing tasks too slow for quick surgeries.....I realize that regardless of my hardwork and persistence, I don't have the "IT" factor and what's required. IF I make it thru school, I feel I probably should stay away from the OR considering my inability...does anyone know any non-patient careers you can do as a CRNA. It's unfortunate because I love Anesthesia, but after hundreds of attempts I realize it's not in the cards for me.

One day these psychomotor skills will come to you.  These are the slowest skills to come to everyone because you can't accomplish them by simply thinking - they require fine motor skills which will come with time.   I had to do all my own spinals alone as a new grad.  They first few weren't very pretty but eventually they become totally intuitive.  You just have to get out there and get the practice.  There are no short cuts.  It sounds like you lack of confidence might be interfering with the reality that you are just a novice and expecting too much of yourself.  There are really no other realistic career tracks for anesthetists.