Commissioning

Posted
by Staczse7 Staczse7 Member

Specializes in ER/Critical Care.

Hi All

Well I did it! It's official I am a member of the "Cool Kids Club" a Commissioned Officer of the U.S. Army and not only that but the prestigious Army Nurse Corps. HOOAH!!!!! To be honest I don't know how I made it through the ceremony. My BF ( a MAJ in the USAR) would repeatedly tell up until last night that the commissioning is a big deal and I'd be like "yeah, ok" and go about my business. But, then standing up there last night, stating the oath........... It really hit me. He was right.

You're not standing there alone, you're there with this other person.... your repeating after him/her and the words are hitting you... not only in your brain.... but surprisingly they hit in your heart your very core and you're suddenly changing.... for me it was more than about the student loan repayment and the bonus, at that point I wouldn't have cared if those were not part of it at all...... it was about being able to have the opportunity to go out and doing the best I can to support those that protect our way of life, that fought for us so that we can go about our way to church, to school, to the store.... etc....., it was about doing the best I can to get someone's loved one home to their family hopefully in one piece and alive and it was about protecting our way of life myself even though still my part seems so small compared to those on the front lines (but i guess if we look at weaponry we're on different front lines-- they have guns and artillery, we have ivs, syringes etc).

The fact that people were watching was a small insignificant role..... they were there but weren't. They were fantastic.... you could hear a pin drop. Even my 7 kids my youngest 10 did not make a peep, no cell phones went off (I couldn't even hear one vibrate and believe me I am highly distractable). my BF's youngest son who I pictured would be the trouble maker (he's 14 and a prima donna) was good as gold as well.

My BF at the end of the oath... (when I was finally able to get it all out, because it seemed forever an eternity because it is something that you cannot take lightly and should not take lightly, because being commissioned is not about worrying about what quarters are going to be like at OBC, or whether you're going to get to wear makeup at OBC or whether there are going to be marches at OBC or whatever.... because all that is insignificant with what you are about to undertake which is probably the one of the biggest promises of loyalty of duty and service to your country that you will ever choose to make) pinned my bars on... and my recruiter handed me a silver dollar to give to the first enlisted soldier that salutes me. then we had dinner and I met a few of the other officers that I'll be "chumming" with.

One last note: The recruiter went on to explain (part of the dinner was he invited potential nurses interested in joining the reserves) about how I got to be commissioned as a 1LT. He explained that I have been a RN for 12 years and that I have a BSN, that made me eligible for 1LT. I will be eligible for CPT. in 6-12 mos and after OBC.

pattyrn376

pattyrn376

118 Posts

are you reserves or active? how many years did you sign for?

lahlee

lahlee

Specializes in Critical Care. 89 Posts

Eloquently stated Ma'am. What you wrote reminded me of a passage in the Army Officer's Guide...

"... to be effective over time in sunshine and rain, in mud and blood, officers must hear and answer a call to service that is no less powerful than that which draws and sustains members of the clergy and other great servants of humanity. It may not come before commissioning, it may not be heard immediatley thereafter, but for those who continue beyond the first few years of service as an Army officer, it will come sooner rather than later or the spirit to go on simply will not be there. Those who do not hear it in its many forms-mystical, practical or otherwise-will not be able to fulfill the demand of being an officer on a sustained basis. There is no shame in failing to hear the call; the is only shame in service as an officer by "going throught the motions." Our Army and our nation deserve more."

Each of us will find our call at different points of our journey. Mine came as I was visiting Washington DC this fall. While at the Vietnam Memorial there is a part dedicated to the nurses who served and a dramatic, heart-wrenching statue dedicated to them. I stood in tears at this statue and I was filled with pride, patriotism and confirmation as I knew that I was going to carry on the legacy of the nurses and women who came before me.

I believe that you will be an effective and integral part of the US Army Nurse Corp and I am proud to serve beside you LT and call you "sister."

ArmyNurse2BSoon

ArmyNurse2BSoon

Specializes in Cardiac Tele, Cath Lab, ICU, ICUSD. Has 8 years experience. 90 Posts

YAY Way to go Edie!!!!! I cant wait to get my bars pinned on me (hopefully that will be soon.....). Im so happy for you and one day soon, I will be in the 'Cool Kids Club' soon!!!

Staczse7

Staczse7

Specializes in ER/Critical Care. 310 Posts

Army2bnursesoon (Kelly..............MY FRIEND)

I HOPE you hear from your recruiter tomorrow the words that you, stacee and I want you to hear.............. Congratulations Lieutenant!!!!! and that your boyfriend Jay, who is home on leave from Iraq will get to take part in your commissioning before he leaves on Wednesday to go back to where his unit was being moved to.

We wait anxiously............

and thank you for your kind words :D

Staczse7

Staczse7

Specializes in ER/Critical Care. 310 Posts

are you reserves or active? how many years did you sign for?

To All

Have a fantastic Day!

Rme4life

Rme4life

Specializes in 66H. Has 2 years experience. 126 Posts

Congrats. I had the pleasure of having my husband put my rank on me and have him be the first to salute me at my commissioning and i also had the pleasure of re-enlisting him. I feel a great pride to serve and love knowing that you serve along side me.

66HotelMikeFive

66HotelMikeFive

Specializes in Emergency RN, CEN. 90 Posts

Very well stated Mam.

I could not have said it better myself. (Except for the makeup part..) You captured my sentiments exactly. Those who have never served, those who have never taken the oath, will never understand. It is indeed something that strikes a chord that resonates deep within your soul, your essence and your whole being. It is not something I take lightly. As I was reading your post, I once again felt those chills that ran down my spine when I took the oath and the realization of the commitment I was making began to sink in. I too look forward to many years of honorable service not only to my country, but to those who fight bravely every day to ensure our way of life in the greatest country on God's green earth.

Hooah

66HM5

Staczse7

Staczse7

Specializes in ER/Critical Care. 310 Posts

Thank you Ma'mam, Thank you Sir

I truly feel honored to be in service alongside all of you and would trust you with my life, with my childrens lives, for you all possess the passion that keeps the true art of nursing alive and well, even if it is fading from the civlian world. I was reading the Army Officer's handbook last night and I saw in it last night the oath. I was amazed at how few words it was in print. It sure did not seem it as I was repeating it, as I was realizing it, as I was beginning to live it! So few words but very powerful---POTENT in its message! I was reliving the moment of the commissioning, as I am sure I will do repeatedly many times during my career in the army. It still seems so surreal at times. But then I go on my faceb**k page, and I look at the people I have already befriended, from my unit and through this forum and I realize it is a new and very significant part of my life now and do not have any regrets.

As I stated while waiting to be boarded-- which already seems so long ago- my life only would change if I were to get commissioned-- indeed it already has changed and for the better-- at least in my case. Again, joining the Army, active or any other component is not to be only for social reasons, sure it can be because your life sucks and you know it'll improve because you can get specialized training that'll help you once you return to the civilian world . But the one thing you really need to be sure of is when you're taking the oath is that you're doing the right thing not only for you but for YOUR country.

sassysoldier

sassysoldier

Specializes in Neuro, Surgical, Trauma and ICU.. 197 Posts

I never knew I was so patriotic until I really started this process. Your journey for the small time I have been on here and saw you go through the process I am proud of you girl!!!!! Even though "eventuall" I will be blue and you will be green I wish I could salute you. My father is retired Army and I smile because when my parents go to the hospital I know there are some excellent green nurses taking care of them. When he gets to jabberin' about his old days on the Ft. and his not so happy days in Vietnam I know he is in the hands of nurses who care, who know what it means to put those bars on. I almost teared up when I read your post. I can't imagine what I will do when I get to that point of my ceremony. I might look like I'm at my wedding again get up there and start the half ugly cry. :cry:

Hi All

You're not standing there alone, you're there with this other person.... your repeating after him/her and the words are hitting you... not only in your brain.... but surprisingly they hit in your heart your very core and you're suddenly changing.... for me it was more than about the student loan repayment and the bonus, at that point I wouldn't have cared if those were not part of it at all...... it was about being able to have the opportunity to go out and doing the best I can to support those that protect our way of life, that fought for us so that we can go about our way to church, to school, to the store.... etc....., it was about doing the best I can to get someone's loved one home to their family hopefully in one piece and alive and it was about protecting our way of life myself even though still my part seems so small compared to those on the front lines (but i guess if we look at weaponry we're on different front lines-- they have guns and artillery, we have ivs, syringes etc).

The fact that people were watching was a small insignificant role..... they were there but weren't. They were fantastic.... you could hear a pin drop. Even my 7 kids my youngest 10 did not make a peep, no cell phones went off (I couldn't even hear one vibrate and believe me I am highly distractable). my BF's youngest son who I pictured would be the trouble maker (he's 14 and a prima donna) was good as gold as well.

My BF at the end of the oath... (when I was finally able to get it all out, because it seemed forever an eternity because it is something that you cannot take lightly and should not take lightly, because being commissioned is not about worrying about what quarters are going to be like at OBC, or whether you're going to get to wear makeup at OBC or whether there are going to be marches at OBC or whatever.... because all that is insignificant with what you are about to undertake which is probably the one of the biggest promises of loyalty of duty and service to your country that you will ever choose to make) pinned my bars on... and my recruiter handed me a silver dollar to give to the first enlisted soldier that salutes me. then we had dinner and I met a few of the other officers that I'll be "chumming" with.

Staczse7

Staczse7

Specializes in ER/Critical Care. 310 Posts

Hi Sassy

I think you will take the oath to heart and realize it's more than a collection of words, it's really the root of what makes our country so great. You're making a promise to help defend the American way of life-- to defend democracy, to defend the freedom of choice, freedom of religion etc. It's what makes us stand above other countries without looking down upon others in a condescending manner and it gives reason as to why other countries are so envious of us. Because of people who serve and protect freedoms that all Americans have. Sassy you're gonna be awesome and I'll salute you anytime (hey is there a salute icon available?)

Just a question: Is the Navy oath the same as the Army oath? Does the same oath get used for all branches of the military?

captncourageous98

captncourageous98

Specializes in Med Surg, Geriatrics. Has 7 years experience. 86 Posts

I just have to chime in here from the "boys club". While reading through your posts I felt the patriatism well up inside of me as I remembered when I first took my oath as a seaman in the navy. I also remember working my way up the ranks in the civilian world and obtaining my LPN. I remember looking back at my family in the audience feeling so proud. I have wanted to be an officer in the military since Top Gun came out! HE HE! Now don't tell me you havn't watched that show and wanted not wanted to be Maverick or Goose. How about our girl Catherine Bell on JAG!!! The patriatism wells up inside of me when I hear you all speak about your experiences and what nursing means to you! I cannot wait until I am one of the cool kids! I congratulate you all and salute you for your service!

Dave

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