Jump to content

Code on the way to CT scan

Nurses   (2,417 Views 8 Comments)
by stram87 stram87 (Member)

stram87 has 4 years experience .

2,072 Profile Views; 60 Posts

Has anyone had their patient code on the way to CT scan? What do you do? Obviously chest compression but if your in the elevator do you call a code for where your getting off? We have "cell" phones that you can call the operator and have them page a code. Where do you bring the patient to? The back hallways outside the elevator would not be an ideal place to run a code.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CathyLew has 17 years experience and specializes in MSP, Informatics.

1 Article; 463 Posts; 7,053 Profile Views

you need to check your policy. I worked at one facility where it depended on where you were in the hall, where the patient came from (i.e. is it a ICU patient, or an ER patient?) And depending on where the code was, a specific crash cart would respond. I am sure they have some sort of scenario set up in your facility.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

highlandlass1592 has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

1 Article; 647 Posts; 10,276 Profile Views

Echo reveiwing policy as to where to take the patient. In critical care, we have to transport for testing quite a bit. This can be a bit dicey at times. We take all the necessary monitoring equipment, emergency drug boxes, ventilators (if being used), etc. If a pt codes on the way, where we will go will depend upon where we are. Have I had to code a pt in Radiology? Yup, it was easier to stay there then try to book it back to the unit...and you want to make it as easy as possible for the emergency response team to find you.

An important point to make is the value of your assessment of the patient. If that patient isn't safe for transport, you have a responsibility to advocate for NOT taking that trip. Will you sometimes still have to go? Yes, if the need for that test outweighs the risks of it not being performed. In that case, find out if you have a rapid response team that can accompany you on the transport...do you have docs available to go as well? I've taken our resident down with us if I felt something was going to go south....with me, respiratory, an MD, another nurse and tech....it can be similar to moving a small army. But better to be prepared and nothing happen than not being prepared and all hell breaking loose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stcroix has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU.

448 Posts; 11,786 Profile Views

I volunteer as a transporter, and this has always been in the back of my mind. Our policy dictates that we stay put (as I do compressions) and have the team find us. I am glad this has never happened. Sometimes when we going to a scan from ICU there are indeed loads of troops. An average trip would have one RN, a tech, two IV poles, portable O-2, and at least one monitor. We have had to stop on many occasions when the monitor goes off, it is usually nothing, but sometimes the patients O-2 sats fall. So far, nothing disastrous, but I still always wonder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

canoehead has 30 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

2 Followers; 6,608 Posts; 48,728 Profile Views

It's never happened to me, but in theory I would make someone get on the stertcher, someone else call a code, and zoom back to the ER if the patient was still on the ER stretcher. We've got more equipment and knowledgeable staff there. The ER and radiology are about 15seconds from each other if you really want to make it quick. If the patient is on the CT scanner we're stuck there. I tend to pack my pockets with meds if there is a possibility of trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

92 Posts; 2,780 Profile Views

Our patients always seem to wait until they're on the table, being scanned. There's something to be said for taking an intubated patient down for a scan, at least resp arrest isn't an issue!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Biffbradford specializes in ICU.

1,097 Posts; 10,070 Profile Views

I had an IABP start alarming in the elevator once. Luckily we (I had another RN along rather than a tech) found the problem quickly and fixed it before it got real hairy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

highlandlass1592 has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

1 Article; 647 Posts; 10,276 Profile Views

And for all those who say they take pockets full of meds with them, don't forget saline flushes for those meds! I learned that one the hard way one time...had all my emergency drug then nothing to flush with! Thank heaven I had an extra bag of saline I could draw from. Now, I either throw a bunch in my pocket or get a pink basin to go with the drug box..fill it with flushes, any extra drips I'm on (you never run out of sedation or pressors till you take a road trip). Better to take it and not need it than need it and not have it. We are in a new part of the hospital, if I forget something it's a 10 minute run back to the unit...I try to be fully prepared.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×