No lift policy

  1. Is this common in nursing homes? I am SO excited just got my first CNA job and its union and they have a strict "no lift policy". Whoohoo I can save my back. I was advised if they cannot even take a few steps from even wheelchair to bed or viceversa a mechinical lift with 2 people is needed.
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    About monters

    Joined: Dec '09; Posts: 74; Likes: 4
    from US

    12 Comments

  3. by   AprilRNurse
    Have you started yet? Everywhere I've worked had that policy- only the place I currently work enforces it. IT's not a No lift though, it's a 30# max policy.

    Most places say no lifting b/c it protects THEM. But if co-workers refuse to help, and roll their eyes everytime you head for the lift- it often goes out the window.
  4. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Not common in my experience.

    Be glad.

    Recognize, though, that sometimes the policy is a name-only one and that practical matters may dictate bending the rules. The union should help ensure this isn't the case for you, though.
  5. by   CoffeemateCNA
    My facility has this.

    In some ways it helps tremendously -- we do not have any silly transfers like "gait belt assist x2" (I think those are the worst -- if a person needs 2 people just to stand up, they are too weak and should obviously be a mechanical lift). It does take a lot longer to get up your residents, though, because 75%+++ of the residents on the long-term halls end up requiring mechanical lifts. It's also a pain because you have to FIND that help unless your facility staffs multiple CNAs on a hall. Because of it, it ends up being me and another CNA just sticking together and doing everything together (which is good because that is my preferred style of working anyways).

    Even though I don't have to lift anyone per se, I still do have occasional back pain because of the strain of turning residents, getting them up onto the side of the bed, etc. So don't think that just because your facility is no-lift that you won't have any back pain or problems down the road -- there are plenty of ways to damage it in this profession even if you do things the right way.
  6. by   monters
    Thanks so much for the replies!
    I start orientation tomorrow. I will be working an 11pm-7am shift p/t so I don't think lifting is going to be a big issue during that time anyway.
  7. by   KimberlyRN89
    Quote from CoffeemateCNA
    My facility has this.

    In some ways it helps tremendously -- we do not have any silly transfers like "gait belt assist x2" (I think those are the worst -- if a person needs 2 people just to stand up, they are too weak and should obviously be a mechanical lift). It does take a lot longer to get up your residents, though, because 75%+++ of the residents on the long-term halls end up requiring mechanical lifts. It's also a pain because you have to FIND that help unless your facility staffs multiple CNAs on a hall. Because of it, it ends up being me and another CNA just sticking together and doing everything together (which is good because that is my preferred style of working anyways).

    Even though I don't have to lift anyone per se, I still do have occasional back pain because of the strain of turning residents, getting them up onto the side of the bed, etc. So don't think that just because your facility is no-lift that you won't have any back pain or problems down the road -- there are plenty of ways to damage it in this profession even if you do things the right way.

    My last job I had an entire hall to myself: 13 residents,3 being a hoyer lift. You're supposed to perform a hoyer lift with two people, but did I ever have anyone there? No. The nurses didnt want to help & the other aides were too busy to come help me. The ones on hoyer lifts were such fall risks that I couldn't leave them in their bed all morning..So I prayed to God very very hard while I used the lifts and I never had an incident. Lol.

    I dont like working in no-lift facilities. While it sounds good in theory, its awful on your back lol. Its hard tracking down extra people to help you lift a heavy resident.
  8. by   CoffeemateCNA
    Quote from MiiszKimberlyCNA
    My last job I had an entire hall to myself: 13 residents,3 being a hoyer lift. You're supposed to perform a hoyer lift with two people, but did I ever have anyone there? No. The nurses didnt want to help & the other aides were too busy to come help me. The ones on hoyer lifts were such fall risks that I couldn't leave them in their bed all morning..So I prayed to God very very hard while I used the lifts and I never had an incident. Lol.
    Been there, done that. At times I wished I could have borrowed my residents' rosaries and held them in the same hand that had the lift controls in it.
  9. by   yousoldtheworld
    I've worked at no lift facilities before, but I'll just be honest with you - it doesn't always work the way it's supposed to.

    For one, we always had trouble having enough lifts. When you only have one or two lifts to use among 5 or 6 aides, finding one can feel like the search for the holy grail. Of course, if you only have a few people who need the lift, it won't be bad.

    At my facilty, 71 of the 80 residents are totally dependent and are supposed to be hoyer lifts...but we have only 3 lifts that work, so as I'm sure you can imagine, we end up doing a lot of lifting anyway.

    BUT! If your facility is actually set up well for this to work, it will be wonderful on your back.
  10. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from yousoldtheworld
    At my facilty, 71 of the 80 residents are totally dependent and are supposed to be hoyer lifts...but we have only 3 lifts that work, so as I'm sure you can imagine, we end up doing a lot of lifting anyway.
    And there's the rub...

    Management knows darn well that their "no-lift" policy is impossible but, boy, if you happen to get hurt while lifting, expect them to throw you under the bus in a second... You violated policy, you know.

    Classic damned if you do and damned if you don't.
  11. by   yousoldtheworld
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    And there's the rub...

    Management knows darn well that their "no-lift" policy is impossible but, boy, if you happen to get hurt while lifting, expect them to throw you under the bus in a second... You violated policy, you know.

    Classic damned if you do and damned if you don't.
    YEP. And my facility is trying to save money, so they're cracking down on overtime...so even if you say "oh, I'll use the lift on everyone, even if it takes me longer", you're out of luck, too - right now, they're writing people up if they stay over the designated shift time without prior approval. >:|
  12. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    What we need are overhead gantries in every patient room and dedicated slings for every patient.
  13. by   fuzzywuzzy
    I was gonna say... I don't work in a "no lift" facility but we do have a lot of people who are supposed to be a hoyer and most of the time we pick them up anyway because it's faster.

    Lifting doesn't seem to strain my back anyway. Constantly bending over does though. And I think pulling the sling out from somebody after I actually do use the hoyer hurts my back worse than the lifting does in the first place. Moving the hoyer in a cramped room is no picnic either.
  14. by   MissChloe
    We do have dedicated Hoyer slings for each patient, and we always use the Hoyer for those that we are supposed to use it for. My back still hurts.

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