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CNA disrespect?

CNA/MA   (7,897 Views 31 Comments)
by cookiescardio cookiescardio (New Member) New Member

423 Visitors; 3 Posts

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Hi, I am really motivated to becoming a cna but have heard a lot of horror stories. Are cna's really disrespected and treated badly? Also, is it worth to invest in a cna program? Also what is your salary as a cna? Thank you for reading my post. 😮😮😮😮😮😮😮😮😮

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3 Articles; 89,014 Visitors; 10,428 Posts

You get what you give. Be a good CNA and worthy of respect.....or be a poor one and not worthy of respect. Some people will not give respect regardless of whether it's due. People are people.

If you want to choose being a nursing assistant for respect, I'd have to say you are heading in the wrong direction. It's a job that some like, some love, some hate, and some are "eh" about it but it brings home a paycheck.

Speaking of paycheck, that depends on your experience, where you are working, what region of the country you are in. As far as "investing in a program", they are pretty cheap to start with so it's not a huge investment. And if you look into nursing homes in your area you might even find some who will offer the course for free, provided you work there once certified.

If you're "really motivated", none of the answers to your questions should make a difference.

Good luck!

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rearviewmirror is a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

5,930 Visitors; 226 Posts

personally I discourage CNA, I worked as nurse tech (basically CNA who is a nursing student) for about 1 yr, and pay sucked while work was burdening; there are other easier jobs that pay the same or even more outside the hospital. With disrespect thing, it really all depends. I used to look down on them because I was a newbie nurse and I had more education, but after growing up a little, figured there wasn't a reason for disrespect to anyone unless I am given the reason to.

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20,354 Visitors; 1,763 Posts

Some nurses disrespect CNAs, some medical students disrespect nurses, some fellows disrespect medical students, and so it goes.

I'm a CNA who works HH and I have never personally felt disrespected. I know my limits, respect other facilities, respect nurses' judgments, and work hard. That being said, there are some nurses out there who may over-delegate gross tasks, and that could make a CNA's life less than thrilling. But this job could also build your confidence in speaking to patients and their families, make you feel more comfortable with patient care, and give you a better understanding of how the system works. Some people want this experience while going through school, while others want a less stressful job while dealing with the stress of nursing school.

CNAs on average make between 9-12 an hour. Some states pay less (7.50) while others pay more (15). It depends on what state you are working in and what type of facility/agency you are working for.

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EMnurse10 has 4 years experience and specializes in CPEN.

522 Visitors; 4 Posts

It really depends on where you work and your own work ethic. Do your job and the nurses will love you. I personally got my medical assistant prior to becoming a nurse and it was the best decision I ever made. I was able to work in the medical field all through nursing school and don't regret it for a minute.

That being said, if you want to work in the medical field prior to becoming a nurse, many facilities require you to either have an MA or a CNA in order to work as a tech.

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verene specializes in mental health, hospice.

9,435 Visitors; 1,428 Posts

I work as a CNA and don't feel that I have ever been intentionally disrespected either by my patients, patient families or my coworkers. I have been confronted with individuals cussing me out, unhappy with care, or just generally upset. I have the boundaries to know that their attitude most likely is not the because of anything I did or didn't do but because of the situation they've found themselves in, and frequently drug use or mental illness have been factors. I deescalate the best I can, and frequently have had these out-of-control individuals apologize for language or attitude once they have regained equilibrium.

Being a CNA is not easy and some may equate the challenges of the work with being treated poorly. If you are looking for an easy job, a glamorous job, or even a job where you are going to recieve frequent praise and ego stroking you will not be happy. If you are willing to work hard and find your own rewards it is a very solid job that can provide healthcare experience.

Unfortunately there are some facilities who do treat their CNA staff poorly (these facilities frequently have cultural problems that mean ALL staff are being treated poorly, the CNAs are just at the bottom of the heap of dysfunction and dissatisfaction), fortunately I've have never worked for one of these facilities. Treating the interview as a time to screen the facility as much as it is a time for the facility to screen you can keep you out of a horrible place.

CNA training is typically not expensive ranging from free if you get into a nursing home that provides in-house training to a couple thousand if through a community college. My training was $645 for the full course including supplies at a CNA/HHA training school. Wages will vary based on geographic region, type of facility, and work experience. The first facility I worked at was a non-profit in community mental health, and wages were just barely above minimum wage with no benefits unless working full-time. Despite the low pay I will however, be eternally grateful for the experience I gained in that position; I had to grow a lot as a professional and as a person and the skills I developed there will surely serve me well in years to come. I now work at a large unionized hospital where wages are substantially higher and anyone working .5FTE or above qualifies for benefits pro-rated by hours. Not only is it a step up in pay, but it is room to grow in that I continue to learn new things, to gain confidence in patient care, to educate and support families, and perhaps most valuable I have experienced aides and nurses around me - many of whom are more than willing to share knowledge.

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FlyingScot has 28 years experience and specializes in Peds/Neo CCT,Flight, ER, Hem/Onc.

21,399 Visitors; 2,016 Posts

I work as a CNA and don't feel that I have ever been intentionally disrespected either by my patients, patient families or my coworkers. I have been confronted with individuals cussing me out, unhappy with care, or just generally upset. I have the boundaries to know that their attitude most likely is not the because of anything I did or didn't do but because of the situation they've found themselves in, and frequently drug use or mental illness have been factors. I deescalate the best I can, and frequently have had these out-of-control individuals apologize for language or attitude once they have regained equilibrium.

Being a CNA is not easy and some may equate the challenges of the work with being treated poorly. If you are looking for an easy job, a glamorous job, or even a job where you are going to recieve frequent praise and ego stroking you will not be happy. If you are willing to work hard and find your own rewards it is a very solid job that can provide healthcare experience.

Unfortunately there are some facilities who do treat their CNA staff poorly (these facilities frequently have cultural problems that mean ALL staff are being treated poorly, the CNAs are just at the bottom of the heap of dysfunction and dissatisfaction), fortunately I've have never worked for one of these facilities. Treating the interview as a time to screen the facility as much as it is a time for the facility to screen you can keep you out of a horrible place.

CNA training is typically not expensive ranging from free if you get into a nursing home that provides in-house training to a couple thousand if through a community college. My training was $645 for the full course including supplies at a CNA/HHA training school. Wages will vary based on geographic region, type of facility, and work experience. The first facility I worked at was a non-profit in community mental health, and wages were just barely above minimum wage with no benefits unless working full-time. Despite the low pay I will however, be eternally grateful for the experience I gained in that position; I had to grow a lot as a professional and as a person and the skills I developed there will surely serve me well in years to come. I now work at a large unionized hospital where wages are substantially higher and anyone working .5FTE or above qualifies for benefits pro-rated by hours. Not only is it a step up in pay, but it is room to grow in that I continue to learn new things, to gain confidence in patient care, to educate and support families, and perhaps most valuable I have experienced aides and nurses around me - many of whom are more than willing to share knowledge.

What an awesome post!!

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RetrieverGirl has 9 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Med/surg tele, home health, travel.

6,086 Visitors; 213 Posts

Starting out as aide is a great experience. I began my nursing career as an aide. I wanted a real feel for being around patients as well as an introduction to nursing. My training was paid for by a local nursing home. There may be some nursing homes that still pay for training. Just do a little research. Not only did they pay for my training and my test, but they paid me an hourly wage during my classes. At the time I could barely afford the gas to get to these classes but I knew it was a good opportunity.

I worked in 2 skilled nursing facilities, one home care agency and then began working independently in home care. I also landed a position in a psychiatric setting due to my background. All of this before becoming an RN. I learned a little bit of this and that from each job that I worked. I believe that it helped me become the nurse that I am today.

Being an aide is definitely not a high paying job, but it is very rewarding. Some of the nurses were very approachable and helpful while went through school, others I knew to keep my distance...but that's pretty much with any job. I deal with that even as a nurse. I am faced with other nurses that are not very helpful at times, ones that leave me with their unfinished work and aides that do not do their job. But then there are some wonderful nurses that I work with that are extremely helpful, aides too.

As for disrespect you're going to deal with that everywhere. Even nurses are disrespected. A lot of times I think the aides are unaware of what nurses have to deal with and they kind of take it to heart when we delegate tasks. In the acute care setting you will see more primary nursing than long term care. Nurses working in the hospital are doing bed changes and fetching water pitchers just as much as any aide. What is very frustrating for nurses is when they are able to do everyone else's job but not everyone is qualified to do their job. No one else can do the nurse's assessments, pass medications, take orders/talk to the physician or document. When orders are not followed it comes back to the nurse (some examples are intakes/outputs, vital signs, walking patients). In text form it doesn't seem like a big deal but it actually is. Aides are a great resource for nurses. Even when I am irritated with an aide I do not talk to them like they are garbage. They are only human and make mistakes too. I always try to encourage them and correct them gently. I try to let them know that I am consumed with something else and need to focus my attention on what is important first. I know that I really shouldn't have to explain myself, but it gives them a better idea of why I need their help at the present time.

Anyway, don't let anyone talk you out of something you really want to do.

Good luck :)

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nursel56 has 25+ years experience and specializes in peds//ambulatory care/HH-private duty.

1 Follower; 43,298 Visitors; 6,653 Posts

Starting out as aide is a great experience. I began my nursing career as an aide. I wanted a real feel for being around patients as well as an introduction to nursing. My training was paid for by a local nursing home. There may be some nursing homes that still pay for training. Just do a little research. Not only did they pay for my training and my test, but they paid me an hourly wage during my classes. At the time I could barely afford the gas to get to these classes but I knew it was a good opportunity.

I worked in 2 skilled nursing facilities, one home care agency and then began working independently in home care. I also landed a position in a psychiatric setting due to my background. All of this before becoming an RN. I learned a little bit of this and that from each job that I worked. I believe that it helped me become the nurse that I am today.

Being an aide is definitely not a high paying job, but it is very rewarding. Some of the nurses were very approachable and helpful while went through school, others I knew to keep my distance...but that's pretty much with any job. I deal with that even as a nurse. I am faced with other nurses that are not very helpful at times, ones that leave me with their unfinished work and aides that do not do their job. But then there are some wonderful nurses that I work with that are extremely helpful, aides too.

As for disrespect you're going to deal with that everywhere. Even nurses are disrespected. A lot of times I think the aides are unaware of what nurses have to deal with and they kind of take it to heart when we delegate tasks. In the acute care setting you will see more primary nursing than long term care. Nurses working in the hospital are doing bed changes and fetching water pitchers just as much as any aide. What is very frustrating for nurses is when they are able to do everyone else's job but not everyone is qualified to do their job. No one else can do the nurse's assessments, pass medications, take orders/talk to the physician or document. When orders are not followed it comes back to the nurse (some examples are intakes/outputs, vital signs, walking patients). In text form it doesn't seem like a big deal but it actually is. Aides are a great resource for nurses. Even when I am irritated with an aide I do not talk to them like they are garbage. They are only human and make mistakes too. I always try to encourage them and correct them gently. I try to let them know that I am consumed with something else and need to focus my attention on what is important first. I know that I really shouldn't have to explain myself, but it gives them a better idea of why I need their help at the present time.

Anyway, don't let anyone talk you out of something you really want to do.

Good luck :)

Another awesome post! :up:

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1,082 Visitors; 93 Posts

i will say that when i worked in the nursing home environment, there was a LOT of disrespect, and there was more of a hierarchy in place too. no sitting behind the nurses station, the staff seemed to associate with other staff in the same area of practice, etc. working in a hospital has been AMAZING. the nurses, aides, everyone, they all work together. we hang out and talk, eat lunch together, the nurses will pitch in, and so will the aides..its like a big family!

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Princess Bubblegum has 8 years experience.

5,594 Visitors; 122 Posts

It is thankless, back-breaking work, but I can't imagine doing anything else at this point in my life. I work my butt off but feel good at the end of the day.

Respect among your peers is easy to earn if you're respectful of others. Be punctual and reliable. Use your resources wisely. Keep a good attitude when things don't go as planned (they rarely ever do). Be honest and open-minded. Do what you're asked by your nurses without talking back. Help others whenever you can. Use concise, timely communication.

I'm making just shy of $16/hr which I think is pretty generous considering how little formal education CNAs need.

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djh123 has 5 years experience and specializes in LTC, Rehab.

1 Article; 15,951 Visitors; 1,100 Posts

I agree with some of the others who are saying (between the lines or not) that it's kind of a 'what goes around, comes around' thing. If you work hard and respect the nurse(s) you're working under, and help your fellow CNA's, then you'll almost always get respect. If you're like one CNA I had, who, despite the fact that I didn't even ASK her to do things all that often, almost always acted annoyed/angry, well, then you won't get as much respect. (She left on her own, and my reaction was 'Yee-hah!' :^).

And here's a potentially helpful hint: some LTC facilities have CNA classes that - I think! - are free, as long as you work there for a bit (I don't know if there's any particular length of time, but I don't think there is at my facility) after the class is over.

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