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Cna & Pct?

Arizona   (22,889 Views 16 Comments)
by dreher101 dreher101 (New Member) New Member

1,277 Profile Views; 8 Posts

Over the summer I was planning on taking classes to become a CNA and then right after, get training to become a PCT.

my question is, Do you HAVE to get your CNA to get your PCT? and if not, would you get paid more $$ if you have both CNA and PCT?

Thanks so much for your help!!

Todd

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38 Posts; 1,800 Profile Views

Todd,

I had this very same question a few days ago and this is what I have found out so far...

From what I understand, you do have to have your CNA to become a PCT. Phoenix College has a PCT program starting in September and here is the website:

http://www.pc.maricopa.edu/index.php?page=29&subpage=651&sublink=663

I have also heard if you get in with a hospital as a CNA they will train you to become a PCT.

I believe a PCT makes more than a CNA because you have more training.

Hope this helps!

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Knorremeisje specializes in OR, Telemetry, PCCU, Med/Surg.

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I was trained and licensed as a CNA. I was then hired at a hospital that mainly used PCT and they trained me there.

Because PCT's don't need a license, there is a vague job description. It depends from hospital to hospital - certification is therefore hard to get. Unless you get the actual certification at a school.

I made the same amount of money as a CNA. So don't expect getting paid all that much more. I recently got hired at a different hospital that doesn't use PCT's at all and I make more money there as a CNA than I did as a PCT.

It really blows that I can't do many things I used to do, though.

Hope this helps!

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Multicollinearity has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Acute Care Psych, DNP Student.

3,119 Posts; 27,606 Profile Views

I was trained and licensed as a CNA. I was then hired at a hospital that mainly used PCT and they trained me there.

Because PCT's don't need a license, there is a vague job description. It depends from hospital to hospital - certification is therefore hard to get. Unless you get the actual certification at a school.

I made the same amount of money as a CNA. So don't expect getting paid all that much more. I recently got hired at a different hospital that doesn't use PCT's at all and I make more money there as a CNA than I did as a PCT.

It really blows that I can't do many things I used to do, though.

Hope this helps!

What kinds of things could you do as a PCT, that you can't do as a CNA?

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cardiacRN2006 is a ADN, RN and specializes in Cardiac.

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What kinds of things could you do as a PCT, that you can't do as a CNA?

Lots more.

I was a tech for 10 years, and was never a CNA.

I could do phlebotomy, ekgs, foleys, dressing changes, and all kinds of other things that CNAs cannot do in most hospitals.

I also made about $4/hr more as a PCT than a CNA would.

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38 Posts; 1,800 Profile Views

Lots more.

I was a tech for 10 years, and was never a CNA.

I could do phlebotomy, ekgs, foleys, dressing changes, and all kinds of other things that CNAs cannot do in most hospitals.

I also made about $4/hr more as a PCT than a CNA would.

I am curious...where did you get your PCT certification? Did you get trained in a hospital or did you go through a program at a CC (like Phoenix College)?

I am debating whether to go ahead and go through the Phoenix College program or get hired on at a hospital and go through their training program.

Thank you!

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cardiacRN2006 is a ADN, RN and specializes in Cardiac.

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I didn't. I was never certified. Well, I was tele certified, but that's spefcific to the hospital.

I took it OTJ at my local hospital. And honestly, I don't think the job entails much more education than that. I got paid to learn. And the majority of those skils helped me immensly during nursing school. There were very, very, very few skills that I had to perform in NS clinicals that I didn't have some kind of experience with.

Invaluable experience.

Plus, when you become a nurse, you will understand the tech role, and be more respected because of your experience.

I am so fortunate of my tech experiences because I work in an all RN ICU-so I have to do everything myself.

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38 Posts; 1,800 Profile Views

I didn't. I was never certified. Well, I was tele certified, but that's spefcific to the hospital.

I took it OTJ at my local hospital. And honestly, I don't think the job entails much more education than that. I got paid to learn. And the majority of those skils helped me immensly during nursing school. There were very, very, very few skills that I had to perform in NS clinicals that I didn't have some kind of experience with.

Invaluable experience.

Plus, when you become a nurse, you will understand the tech role, and be more respected because of your experience.

I am so fortunate of my tech experiences because I work in an all RN ICU-so I have to do everything myself.

I completely agree. I am extremely excited to begin my CNA class in a few weeks and cannot wait to get my foot in the door with a hospital. I know I will be a better nurse one day because of this experience.

Thank you so much for your feedback!

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38 Posts; 1,800 Profile Views

I didn't. I was never certified. Well, I was tele certified, but that's spefcific to the hospital.

I took it OTJ at my local hospital. And honestly, I don't think the job entails much more education than that. I got paid to learn. And the majority of those skils helped me immensly during nursing school. There were very, very, very few skills that I had to perform in NS clinicals that I didn't have some kind of experience with.

Invaluable experience.

Plus, when you become a nurse, you will understand the tech role, and be more respected because of your experience.

I am so fortunate of my tech experiences because I work in an all RN ICU-so I have to do everything myself.

I have another question if you do not mind...after you did your OTJ training for your PCT cert., were you given a raise?

It may sound silly, but I am kind of hesitant about getting hired on as a CNA then going through the PCT training and not getting a somewhat significant raise, does that make sense? I am still wondering if I will have a better chance at a higher wage if I go ahead and get my PCT training on my own.

I appreciate your feedback! Thank you!

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cardiacRN2006 is a ADN, RN and specializes in Cardiac.

4,105 Posts; 16,769 Profile Views

Yep, I got a raise right after the training, and then again every year.

PCTs should make more than CNAs, as they do more work. Because their scope of practice is not monitored by the BON, they are allowed to do more skills normally outside the scope of a CNA (legally).

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18 Posts; 1,445 Profile Views

I didn't. I was never certified. Well, I was tele certified, but that's spefcific to the hospital.

I took it OTJ at my local hospital. And honestly, I don't think the job entails much more education than that. I got paid to learn. And the majority of those skils helped me immensly during nursing school. There were very, very, very few skills that I had to perform in NS clinicals that I didn't have some kind of experience with.

Invaluable experience.

Plus, when you become a nurse, you will understand the tech role, and be more respected because of your experience.

I am so fortunate of my tech experiences because I work in an all RN ICU-so I have to do everything myself.

I Have A Few Q's. Hope You Can Help. I am in my mid forties..self supporting. I was going to go for my LPN.. in order to work. I had taken my CNA two yrs.. ago.. but the Certificate has expired.. and I do not....want to repeat that course. It was useful...however.. I did not take my licesnsing exam. I live in WI. I know they require that you attended for CNA .. not the licensing..But.. I am uncertain and can 't get an answer... to whether or not.. they accept a Certificate past the exam date or not. Since the licensing isn't required. Also.. I don't have the money to re take this CNA course.. when I was fresh out of school a few yrs ago.. the only places that wanted to hire CNAs were nursing homes.. and I wanted hospital work. I would like to also become a Cardiac Nurse one day. My question is: Is there a training program for Med Tech.. and how long is it? How is it differen't then Medical Assistant.. and is the pay differen't between the two? I love.. the fact that the exposure is there.. unlike CNA.. they are more basice care. I would rather invest in that .. if I have to . It would be nice to be trained as a PCT without a CNA. But.. today.. I highly doubt that will happen. Thanks

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azcna has 3 years experience and specializes in LTC, Rehab, CCU, Alzheimers, Med-Surg.

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I got my CNA, worked in a nursing home for 9 months, took a PCT class through my CC, worked at the nursing home 3 more months (so I would have 1 yrs worth of experience, as that is what most hospitals prefer/require for techs). Then I applied for tech jobs and got in because I had the experience, and I had taken the initiative to get PCT training. I'm sure there are hospitals that are willing to train people, but training costs money. If you already have training then a lot of hospitals will look at you because they don't have to invest extra money into training you. It also shows the hospital that you are serious about being a tech because you went out and got training on your own. I'm not saying the way I did it is the only way to go, but it is an option :)

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