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Chicago Closes Two Nursing Schools

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by DoGoodThenGo DoGoodThenGo (Member)

DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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"Hyman stressed that she is "acutely aware" of the nationwide nursing shortage and is not reducing the "overall capacity" of the City Colleges' program. She said she plans to "grow" the nursing program over time and upgrade nursing facilities."

OMG. What part of new grads not being able to find jobs and experienced nurses being unemployed the media does not understand. I think we should start regulating how many nurses schools graduate a year in order to protect the nursing profession. Everytime I tell someone I'm studying to be a nurse, I get the response that I will be making 40 per hour, sign on bonus of at least $5,000, and employers will be begging me to do over time. I wonder what it's going to take before the media really start educating people that the nursing profession is hurting like other areas.

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Closing unaccredited programs makes sense.

In the short term there is a surplus but looking out 10 years it is different. (I work with three nurse who are all late fifties and they will retire in the next 5 years.)

The coming shortage is a real thing. In 2020 many nurses who were trained between 1975-1990 will be hitting retirement eligibility.

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KimberlyRN89 works as a New Grad.

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Closing unaccredited programs makes sense.

In the short term there is a surplus but looking out 10 years it is different. (I work with three nurse who are all late fifties and they will retire in the next 5 years.)

The coming shortage is a real thing. In 2020 many nurses who were trained between 1975-1990 will be hitting retirement eligibility.

I totally agree. My mom is soon to be 56 & has been a nurse over 30 years. A lot of her colleagues are in her age range too. Maybe things are bad right now, but in 5-10 years I think there will indeed be a shortage.

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surferbettycrocker works as a caring for and about people.

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I totally agree. My mom is soon to be 56 & has been a nurse over 30 years. A lot of her colleagues are in her age range too. Maybe things are bad right now, but in 5-10 years I think there will indeed be a shortage.

call me crazy but i think even 'shortage' will be too soft a word to describe what's gonna happen when, not only are a great deal of the country's most experienced RN's will be retiring ANd requiring quality care, are we really running that much

of a nursing 'surplus' to ensure our fellow RN's will receive the care they deserve when they are on the other side of

the call bell??:confused::twocents:

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Unaccredited programs should go. Many prospective students do not realize that the lack of accreditation can bite them badly down the road. They don't even know to ask about it, much less what the right answer is.

Regarding the shortage or lack thereof, think of a giant logjam. Nurses who were going to retire took a hit in their 401Ks and stayed put. Nurses who were part time increased their hours to full time. Nurses who had taken a hiatus to raise kids or go back to school returned to the work force.

Eventually, current conditions will improve (I hope!) and the logjam will clear. When that happens, we'll be right back to where we were a few years ago with students having several job openings lined up before graduation and employers offering hiring bonuses.

The problem? There may not be enough nurses to fill the void. "Old grads" who passed NCLEX but couldn't find work may have gone on to other careers. Folks who shied away from nursing school for fear they wouldn't get jobs won't be in the pipeline. Others may have dropped out of nursing school along the way, figuring it just wasn't worth the hassle.

Add to this an aging population with the boomers being like the lump in the well-fed boa constrictor, and not only will the resources fall, the need will rise. Dramatically.

It could take us years to find a good balance between supply and demand.

This is all assuming the economy recovers in the near future. I hope the fall elections do something to help bring that about.

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These were notoriously poorly-run programs. The students and public are better served without them.

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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Here is one program's take on accreditation:

http://www.scc.spokane.edu/?nursingaccred

IMHO the question need to be asked of a program is "why" they don't have the NLN or other seal of approval.

If the have applied and or are working with the NLN that is one thing. If they have no intentions of seeing accreditation, or been turned down/removed and again aren't willing to do the work required to reverse, then we are onto something IMHO.

Personally think accreditation *may* have mattered less when a majority of nurses were not only educated locally at hospital programs and were employed by the same. However today there is no telling where one's nursing career will take them, thus attending a non-approved program probably is something that should be tought over long and hard.

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Lovely_RN has 6 years experience and works as a RN.

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I have a strong feeling that the solution will be importing foreign nurses in order to fill the openings and of course suppress wages. Right now as I type aren't there roughly a million licensed RNs in the Philippines who are seeking employment? Not to imply that the Philippines is the only country where foreign nurses come from but I think they have the largest pool of nurses who wish to emigrate to the US, Europe, or Canada right now? I'm pretty sure that our government will quickly draft some legislation that gives foreign nurses quick entry into the country to fill the shortage. Maybe I'm paranoid but nothing that our government has done to (not for mind you but to) the working people over the last 3 decades leads me to believe other-wise. So yeah there will be more opportunities but I strongly doubt it's going to be great.

The problem? There may not be enough nurses to fill the void. "Old grads" who passed NCLEX but couldn't find work may have gone on to other careers. Folks who shied away from nursing school for fear they wouldn't get jobs won't be in the pipeline. Others may have dropped out of nursing school along the way, figuring it just wasn't worth the hassle.

Add to this an aging population with the boomers being like the lump in the well-fed boa constrictor, and not only will the resources fall, the need will rise. Dramatically.

It could take us years to find a good balance between supply and demand.

This is all assuming the economy recovers in the near future. I hope the fall elections do something to help bring that about.

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DoGoodThenGo works as a Entrepreneur - Business Owner.

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I have a strong feeling that the solution will be importing foreign nurses in order to fill the openings and of course suppress wages. Right now as I type aren't there roughly a million licensed RNs in the Philippines who are seeking employment? Not to imply that the Philippines is the only country where foreign nurses come from but I think they have the largest pool of nurses who wish to emigrate to the US, Europe, or Canada right now? I'm pretty sure that our government will quickly draft some legislation that gives foreign nurses quick entry into the country to fill the shortage. Maybe I'm paranoid but nothing that our government has done to (not for mind you but to) the working people over the last 3 decades leads me to believe other-wise. So yeah there will be more opportunities but I strongly doubt it's going to be great.

There are many reasons why the Phillipines has become a cottage industry for training and exporting nurses around the world, and in particular the United States, but a few stand out in the case of the later.

Until immigration laws were changed around the 1960's or 1970's (maybe earlier or later), the system favoured persons from Europe, mainly northern Europeans. Hospitals brought nurses to these shores from the UK, Ireland, Scotland, Sweden, and so forth. One plus was because these countries produced nurses who already spoke English.

When the laws were changed, the Phillipines were favoured as it was a country that already had a special relationship with the United States, and as a direct result could supply nurses who spoke English.

If you look at the Phillipines you can see many of the same conditions that produced legions of workers of every sort that were exported or roamed once all over Northern Europe. A large population with limited local resources for employment. High birth rates mean this population increases ever more, far out pacing the local economy's ability to produce high paying or even decent employment for all. For nursing, hotel, cleaning, domestic service and so forth you also have large numbers of females with little chances of finding good work locally.

Not trying to typecast any population, but if you look at things in relation to the nursing profession you can find striking paraells.

Until laws changed, women in the United States had limited employment chances, and thus many "ended up" as nurses or teachers. The high birth rate, especially for those of Norther European or at least European backgrounds meant there was a good supply of girls/women that entered the profession, even if only because it was the only "job in town".

However if you look around Northern Europe and to some extent the United States, once women gained an open playing field in employment, numbers of those entering nursing dropped. Northern European countries have had a "nursing shortage" for many years, and while imports from the Phillipines and the recent economic upheavals have put a break on this in the US, long term outlook is about the same.

The one thing common on both sides of the pond is that birthrates are dropping, in particular for "educated" women. It is going to be interesting to see how this plays out. The United States is a very desirable place to move to, and therefore it could do several things to lessen the reliance on imported nurses just from the Phillipines.

For instance it could allow non-US citizen graduates of American nursing programs to to remain in the country and seek employment. A sort of 'fast track" green card if you will. There is serious talk about some such place for college grads in other areas who currently must leave the country after their studies end.

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evalesco works as a MDS.

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These were notoriously poorly-run programs. The students and public are better served without them.

I could not agree more.

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RN1980 works as a to pay bills.

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i wish they would close down a few nursing programs here in my state. there is like 20 programs pumping out nurses like puppy mills. thats way too many new nurses for the size of my state.

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