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Chances of finding RN position with the ability to commit only a few months before moving?

Nurses   (235 Views | 6 Replies)

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I'm a new grad and am applying for local RN positions. I'm moving out of state in a few months (late July/early August) and I'm worried that no one will want to hire me and begin training me with a concrete exit date so soon. Has anyone had any experience with a similar situation, or does anyone have suggestions? 

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11 Followers; 3,881 Posts; 30,613 Profile Views

It is highly doubtful anyone is going to hire you for such a short period. I’m curious to know why you aren’t searching for a job in the area you’re moving to.

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528 Posts; 2,381 Profile Views

I wouldn't bother.  You'll be on orientation at least 8 weeks, which if you started Monday takes you to early July.  And then you'll leave 3-6 weeks later? How will you account for this if they ask in your next job interview? They'll be able to figure out you graduated, applied, took a job and then left all in the space of 3 months or so.  I wouldn't hire you if you came into an interview with that kind of resume.

Edited by Elaine M

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2 Posts; 18 Profile Views

5 minutes ago, Wuzzie said:

It is highly doubtful anyone is going to hire you for such a short period. I’m curious to know why you aren’t searching for a job in the area you’re moving to.

I'm applying to jobs where I'm moving as well, I just don't want to be unemployed until I move. Unfortunately my current job (non-healthcare related) hasn't been bringing in much business and has cut staff hours. I was hoping to transition to nursing as soon as possible but I was worried that the case would be that no employer would bother. 

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11 Followers; 3,881 Posts; 30,613 Profile Views

It would be an enormous waste of time and money for them. Probably better to just concentrate on a job in your new area. You might be able to find a short term CNA position in an LTC in the meantime. 

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Numenor has 8 years experience as a MSN, NP and specializes in Internal Medicine.

251 Posts; 599 Profile Views

On 5/4/2020 at 7:17 PM, soluscreas said:

I'm applying to jobs where I'm moving as well, I just don't want to be unemployed until I move. Unfortunately my current job (non-healthcare related) hasn't been bringing in much business and has cut staff hours. I was hoping to transition to nursing as soon as possible but I was worried that the case would be that no employer would bother. 

0 chance unless you lied. The cost of training you as a new grad is easily 50-75k. Don't waste their time.

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497 Posts; 6,967 Profile Views

If you were an experienced nurse who could hit the ground running, you might be able to find temporary work.  But as a new grad who will need extensive orientation, it's not in anyone's interest to hire you for such a short time.

Also, COVID has thrown a real wrench into normal operations.  Lots of people are being sent home for low census, and other places are not able to do the hiring and onboarding with HR working from home, etc.  

I work in a relatively hard hit hospital outside NY where for most of April we had a very full census with COVID and COVID r/o, and creation of auxiliary ICUs, etc.  Now those admissions are trending down (thankfully!), but we're not open for normal business, and it will be a couple of weeks before former COVID floors can be properly decontaminated for non-emergent surgeries to start up again.  So, despite being in a hot zone, I was on call yesterday for low census.  Places that shut down non-emergent services in preparation for a COVID surge may not have had the surge yet, and are bleeding money and workers' hours are still cut.  

I think this year's new grads are going to be in uncharted waters for their first job search, and job availability is going to be highly variable from location to location.  My advice is to focus your search on the area where you're moving. Perhaps you can file for unemployment because your hours have been cut or you can move out early if you get an offer. It's not ideal, but the overall jobs picture is pretty grim right now for much of the country.  You may need to be more flexible than you thought.

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