What's the longest you ever took off from work?

  1. I am asking this as I am hoping to eventually work locum and take extended time off in between assignments. Maybe only working one or two assignments a year that are a few months each. Has anyone - locum or not - taken 6mos or more off and had repercussions when re-entering the job market? Were you asked why you took the time off etc? Do you think a year or more off would be the same?

    Thanks a million for any info on this.
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    About Raas4555

    Joined: Jun '08; Posts: 68; Likes: 9

    6 Comments

  3. by   Raas4555
    Wow, no replies at all!
  4. by   loveanesthesia
    Well, you have to think about the patients you are caring for. I've taken 10 weeks leave and felt "rusty", things just didn't flow for a few days. Personally I don't think it is a good idea to take most of the year off. Your skills will not be the same. Someone analyzed how many decisions are made during a routine induction and it was in the 100s.
  5. by   Raas4555
    I know you are speaking from your experience, which from the many posts I have read from you is quite a bit! I do want to find a way to do it. As much as being a CRNA is important to me, there is another part of my life that is important to me and that requires my being where the job is not possible. So I have to find a way to do both. While it's a quite a ways off still, I am moving along pretty well so far, and so I am just thinking about when I realize the goal how I will do it.

    Firstly, I am aware that locum is only after getting some very solid experience.

    Secondly, I will do what it takes for me to remain fresh in my skills. Such as putting together reviews, etc. for myself.

    So do you think that it will work? I feel very confident about being able to do it. And locum jobs are going to expect you to be unfamiliar with their particular layout and technology etc. so coming back on the scene will be a little buffered by that.

    That was a very interesting comment - that about 100 decisions are made during a routine induction. But once you have the expertise, don't you retain that capability for at least months if not more?
  6. by   loveanesthesia
    Quote from Raas4555
    I know you are speaking from your experience, which from the many posts I have read from you is quite a bit! I do want to find a way to do it. As much as being a CRNA is important to me, there is another part of my life that is important to me and that requires my being where the job is not possible. So I have to find a way to do both. While it's a quite a ways off still, I am moving along pretty well so far, and so I am just thinking about when I realize the goal how I will do it.

    Firstly, I am aware that locum is only after getting some very solid experience.

    Secondly, I will do what it takes for me to remain fresh in my skills. Such as putting together reviews, etc. for myself.

    So do you think that it will work? I feel very confident about being able to do it. And locum jobs are going to expect you to be unfamiliar with their particular layout and technology etc. so coming back on the scene will be a little buffered by that.

    That was a very interesting comment - that about 100 decisions are made during a routine induction. But once you have the expertise, don't you retain that capability for at least months if not more?
    A lot of anesthesia is psychomotor skills, and that depends on hands on repetition. Kind of like reading about tennis will not keep you playing at your best. You need to kit the ball.

    When someone hires a locums, you are costing more than the full time staff. You get paid a premium to come in and replace someone immediately. You probably get maybe half a day before you are expected to earn your fee. Some things you could do is come in a few days early without pay to refresh your skills. Maybe you could develop more of a long term relationship with someone where you could come back to the same place. I doubt they'd pay you locums rate, and maybe you'd need to actually discount your rate to get them to agree.

    For this to work the way you describe, you are depending on the CRNA shortage staying as acute as it has been. Locums work has been softening in the past 12 months. The question you need to ask yourself is, do you want to become a CRNA if you can't take 6 months a year off?

    I really don't think I will change your mind, so good luck.
  7. by   Raas4555
    I appreciate your advice. I am considering volunteering when off from work also. Maybe that is a better way to keep up the skills. Hopefully the situation with CRNAs not really being employed in place of MD Anesthesiologists changes outside the US.
  8. by   Ms. Anesthetist
    I don't do locum tenens, but the longest I've taken off work was 6 months for maternity leave. When I returned, it was like I never left. I guess it would all depend on how much experience you have acquired prior to your time off, if you are referring to losing your "skills".

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