Very Unhappy With My Career - page 4

I've been a nurse anesthetist for 12 years and I absolutely HATE my career choice. I dread going to work each day. I'm tired of the arrogant surgeons, condescending and controlling anesthesiologist... Read More

  1. by   loveanesthesia
    Quote from RdytoLearn
    Hi there,
    I am a young student in nursing school and truly fascinated with anesthesia and all the components involved with its administration. I have been doing a lot of research and reading about this field of healthcare and have become extremely interested in it. I realize the tough sacrifices one must make in order to become a CRNA and am really thinking hard about going for it. HOWEVER, after reading this post I am really rethinking that career choice.

    My question is: Should I really rethink my career path to becoming a CRNA? I know many will say that it's about you...and.... BUT, this is seriously sad to hear that someone is depressed and unhappy with the choice to become a CRNA when I've been making it a huge goal of mine to achieve. What are the downfalls that have made this job become so depressing because it really hurts to hear this..
    For those who ask "what's wrong with becoming a CRNA for the money" the OP is your answer. She wants to do something else but feels she can't leave because of the money she makes as a CRNA. Don't do it unless you enjoy it. Otherwise it is very stressful.
  2. by   MaryCRNA
    I'm so sorry you are unhappy. I love being a CRNA. I do work at a facility where you are treated very well and work as a team. I think you should consider changing employers. Good luck, Mary
  3. by   bread angel
    I agree with Mary, becoming a CRNA was the best decision of my life. However, I know a number of CRNAs who are unhappy in their practice setting. My advise is to find another position after deciding what is important to you. Of course, some things will never change in anesthesia.

    • Surgeons want to operate and rarely care about anything or anyone else. (I like to remind them that the "blood brain barrier" refers to the anesthesia screen that separates us from them.)
    • ORs are cold, noisy, usually have no windows and generally are not good from an worker environmental standpoint.
    • You can only give one anesthetic at a time and cannot leave your patient to go to the restroom, get lunch or take a break.
    • OR nurses and OR techs think we make too much money.
    • We make giving anesthesia look too easy, so no one realizes how grueling the education is, how much we have to know and the responsibility we have.
    • No one is happy for your success, except your mother.

    There is nothing in the world I would rather do than be a CRNA, but it is not for everyone.
  4. by   johnson0424
    that is why I became a crnp...independence or at least in my state
  5. by   GeriatrxRN
    I wonder if people are realizing that this post is 4 yrs old; some people are still answering the post/giving advice as if it was posted recently. Also wonder what happened to the op and if he found another job or what...he never posted after the original post.
  6. by   lml33
    I feel exactly the same. I have been a CRNA since 2006. I am miserable at my current job. My prior job was great. I had tons of autonomy. I left the job that I loved to move back home, closer to my family and friends. I can't stand being medically directed. I am also being forced into getting the flu vaccination. I may lose my job because of my refusal. My reasons are too much to explain. Because the market is tight, it is very difficult to get my autonomy back. I am seriously considering legal consulting.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    i am not, nor have i ever aspired to be a crna. that said, you sound like a classic case of burnout. i can speak to that; been there, done that. what worked for me was a change -- change of shift, change of location, change of specialties, change of job. and once i lost my temper, told off my boss and moved 3000 miles. i'm not recommending that, but it sure cured the burnout! if you're a crna, you're an rn, aren't you? ever thought of stepping back for a bit and perhaps moving to pacu or icu for awhile? if you like the patient interaction, icu may be a good place for you. i know a couple of crnas who've done that. one stayed happily in icu for a number of years, and the other eventually went back to passing gas but with a whole new outlook. good luck, no matter what you decide to do!
  8. by   nomadcrna
    He is right. He is asking for CRNA advice because you need to be a CRNA to truly understand the various options to alleviate his issues.

    Quote from aquaphoneRN
    So, in the future, I should not give advice to anyone unless I have the same job title?

    Why do you feel threatened by an non-CRNA giving career advice?
  9. by   nomadcrna
    this is a classic example. if you went back to icu, you would still be considered a different level of care and have the same liability as before. so you are not judged as an rn but a crna.
    i have never heard of a crna voluntarily working as a regular rn again.


    Quote from ruby vee
    i am not, nor have i ever aspired to be a crna. that said, you sound like a classic case of burnout. i can speak to that; been there, done that. what worked for me was a change -- change of shift, change of location, change of specialties, change of job. and once i lost my temper, told off my boss and moved 3000 miles. i'm not recommending that, but it sure cured the burnout! if you're a crna, you're an rn, aren't you? ever thought of stepping back for a bit and perhaps moving to pacu or icu for awhile? if you like the patient interaction, icu may be a good place for you. i know a couple of crnas who've done that. one stayed happily in icu for a number of years, and the other eventually went back to passing gas but with a whole new outlook. good luck, no matter what you decide to do!
  10. by   CABGx4
    You've never heard RN's complain about their job?? cmon now
  11. by   subee
    Quote from nomadcrna
    He is right. He is asking for CRNA advice because you need to be
    a CRNA to truly understand the various options to alleviate his issues.

    Yes
    No


    Mis-typed
    Last edit by subee on Feb 16, '12 : Reason: Mis-typed

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