Regional Anesthesia

  1. All SRNAs and CRNAs,
    What is your experience with Regional anesthesia? I am currently in my last year of my program. I would love to learn regional anesthesia! THe hospital where my program is based has had a strict policy that regional anesthesia is not taught to the SRNAs in the facility. The director who's policy that was is gone now, but there is still quite a bit of resistance to the teacyhing of SRNAs. Is this the experience of other nurse anesthesia students and practitioners? I'm frustrated and quite irritated today about this. We have to leave the facility to learn our epidurals, blocks, and other regional experience. What kind of experience are the rest of you getting/got? What I don't think this program realizes is that the SRNAs are just as much of a reflection on the anestheia department here as the residents are. Do residents get preferential treatment at your facilities?
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    About sonessrna

    Joined: Jun '04; Posts: 142; Likes: 16

    20 Comments

  3. by   CougRN
    Quote from sonessrna
    All SRNAs and CRNAs,
    What is your experience with Regional anesthesia? I am currently in my last year of my program. I would love to learn regional anesthesia! THe hospital where my program is based has had a strict policy that regional anesthesia is not taught to the SRNAs in the facility. The director who's policy that was is gone now, but there is still quite a bit of resistance to the teacyhing of SRNAs. Is this the experience of other nurse anesthesia students and practitioners? I'm frustrated and quite irritated today about this. We have to leave the facility to learn our epidurals, blocks, and other regional experience. What kind of experience are the rest of you getting/got? What I don't think this program realizes is that the SRNAs are just as much of a reflection on the anestheia department here as the residents are. Do residents get preferential treatment at your facilities?
    we don't have residents at our facility, so that isn't an issue. but what we consider our "primary" site kind of has the same policy as yours does. it's a small community hospital though and we go to 5 other places and get plenty of regional experience at these places. so even though the "primary" place doesn't allow them we get plenty of experience.
  4. by   sonessrna
    Quote from CougRN
    we don't have residents at our facility, so that isn't an issue. but what we consider our "primary" site kind of has the same policy as yours does. it's a small community hospital though and we go to 5 other places and get plenty of regional experience at these places. so even though the "primary" place doesn't allow them we get plenty of experience.
    I haven't gone to the other clinical areas where regional is allowed yet. I'm just really frustrated with this place I am now. I'm tired of being told that because I don't have MD behind my name I am less important and my education is also that way. Literally, that is what we are told. Residents have the priority, with everything. Livers, hearts, vascular, heads, etc. Maybe that's the way it is all over, but we shouldn't compete, we should all have an opportunity for all kinds of cases, maybe I'm being too altruistic. Just frustrated.
  5. by   dm2
    I know you are seeking info from your peers re this learning experience.......
    my reply has a different view, but please tolerate the digression......

    I am an ER RN who has experience with an ortho who always does regional blocks. They are a godsend for my pt's comfort!!!! Effective and prompt relief and no doped up side effects to deal with. Stick with whatever you have to do to learn and get priveldges for these procedures! I wish more were able to do this at the bedside!!!!
  6. by   sonessrna
    Quote from dm2
    I know you are seeking info from your peers re this learning experience.......
    my reply has a different view, but please tolerate the digression......

    I am an ER RN who has experience with an ortho who always does regional blocks. They are a godsend for my pt's comfort!!!! Effective and prompt relief and no doped up side effects to deal with. Stick with whatever you have to do to learn and get priveldges for these procedures! I wish more were able to do this at the bedside!!!!
    I agree with you. I will someday be working in a small hospital where I may need to be able to do these blocks, why should I learn then and not while I'm in school!!
  7. by   BigDave
    The program that I'm going to start at UNCC has a similar political limitation. We are to be farmed out for three months to other cities (Ashville, Boone, etc.) to get regional experience.
  8. by   loisane
    Nurse anesthesia programs throughout the country have been facing this issue for awhile. While it is frustrating to have to go to multiple sites to get these experiences, you could look at it from an alternative perspective. It is an incredible achievement that your program has found an alternative way to get this opportunity for its students, and be able to remain open, since regional experiences are minimum requirements for accreditation.

    The opportunities to continue your growth as a regional expert are definitely out there post graduation. Make this one of your priorities when seeking your first job. I compare it to learning IV starts. We got to do a few in nursing school, but the real hands on experience to become an expert comes after employment. Similarly, some RNs go to work in a place where special IV teams do all the starts, and this is not the best place to work as a brand new RN who would like to further develop their skills in this area.

    And once you graduate, get involved in your profession through your state and national association. Our right to a full scope of practice is not guaranteed to us simply because it is "fair" or even that it is good for patients, or any other reason you want to name. It is politics, pure and simple. Maintaining a strong professional presence at both state and national levels is the only way we are going to hold our ground.

    loisane crna
  9. by   sonessrna
    Quote from loisane
    Nurse anesthesia programs throughout the country have been facing this issue for awhile. While it is frustrating to have to go to multiple sites to get these experiences, you could look at it from an alternative perspective. It is an incredible achievement that your program has found an alternative way to get this opportunity for its students, and be able to remain open, since regional experiences are minimum requirements for accreditation.

    The opportunities to continue your growth as a regional expert are definitely out there post graduation. Make this one of your priorities when seeking your first job. I compare it to learning IV starts. We got to do a few in nursing school, but the real hands on experience to become an expert comes after employment. Similarly, some RNs go to work in a place where special IV teams do all the starts, and this is not the best place to work as a brand new RN who would like to further develop their skills in this area.

    And once you graduate, get involved in your profession through your state and national association. Our right to a full scope of practice is not guaranteed to us simply because it is "fair" or even that it is good for patients, or any other reason you want to name. It is politics, pure and simple. Maintaining a strong professional presence at both state and national levels is the only way we are going to hold our ground.

    loisane crna
    I hear what you're saying. I'm just frustrated as a student in the middle of the political BS. Do you have any regional classes or continuing education seminars you can recommend that I can look out for in the next couple years. I'm still a year from graduation, so starting a seminar somwhere might be next to impossible due to clinical scheduling. However, it's always good for me to have an idea of where to look when I'm done. Thanks for your support. ANd I totally agree. Join your national and state organizations and become involved.
  10. by   loisane
    Quote from sonessrna
    Do you have any regional classes or continuing education seminars you can recommend that I can look out for in the next couple years.
    I sent you a PM.

    {playing by the TOS rules ;-)

    loisane crna
  11. by   Franklin McShane
    I am a CRNA in a small community hospital in rural Wisconsin, and we do about 65% of ALL cases with a block of some sort. Regional experience in your practice setting is much like regional experience in your program. There are places that do it and there are places that don't. I personally really believe in the superiority of regional anesthesia - that is why I practice where I do. If you want to do regional when you graduate, you will have to find a place that does a lot of regional and is willing to train. Unless you are in the military schools - there are very few schools that have a great regional experience. The important thing to remember is that there are places where CRNAs do lots of regional - you just have to look for them. Good Luck.
  12. by   WntrMute2
    Quote from sonessrna
    All SRNAs and CRNAs,
    What is your experience with Regional anesthesia? I am currently in my last year of my program. I would love to learn regional anesthesia! THe hospital where my program is based has had a strict policy that regional anesthesia is not taught to the SRNAs in the facility. The director who's policy that was is gone now, but there is still quite a bit of resistance to the teacyhing of SRNAs. Is this the experience of other nurse anesthesia students and practitioners? I'm frustrated and quite irritated today about this. We have to leave the facility to learn our epidurals, blocks, and other regional experience. What kind of experience are the rest of you getting/got? What I don't think this program realizes is that the SRNAs are just as much of a reflection on the anestheia department here as the residents are. Do residents get preferential treatment at your facilities?

    Yes, residents almost always get preferential treatment. For those of you choosing a school there are 3 questions here you should be asking when interviewing. Do you also train residents? What kind of regional training will I get? What kind of line placement experience will I get? On the other hand, hospitals/groups that allow CRNAs to do regional or line placement will usually train those that are interested. Just be ready for frustration if you choose a school that doesn't do much regional/line training. You WILL get to hold the patient when god comes into the room to place that SAB tho ;P
  13. by   smiling_ru
    Maybe we should add to the FAQ which programs have a lot of regional and line placement opportunities.
  14. by   air
    Quote from smiling_ru
    Maybe we should add to the FAQ which programs have a lot of regional and line placement opportunities.
    Excellent idea

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