How Old Is Too Old?

  1. I am a late bloomer and became a RN at the ripe old age of 43. I had prevoiusly worked as a OR and Anes. tech. I have spent the past 8 years working ICU as a staff nurse and as a travel nurse. I am now 51 and am considering going back to school for CRNA. I will be working for a number of years and would like to improve myself. Do you know if anyone has began CRNA school in their 50's, and what are the schools take on older students? I would appreciate your honest thoughts. Thank you in advance for your opinions...
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  2. Visit etrn1 profile page

    About etrn1

    Joined: May '04; Posts: 4

    9 Comments

  3. by   Still Riding
    i would think of it this way. How old will you be when you graduate? then think of the age you would like to retire at? if that is what you wanna do then go for it. It is never to late to improve ourselves.

    But i guess it may be hard coming from me because I will be 22 when i graduate with my BSN and only then need to write my enterance exam.

    If going back to school is what you want then go for it. don't let anyone stop you don't worry about your age.
  4. by   big sweet life
    Quote from etrn1
    I am a late bloomer and became a RN at the ripe old age of 43. I had prevoiusly worked as a OR and Anes. tech. I have spent the past 8 years working ICU as a staff nurse and as a travel nurse. I am now 51 and am considering going back to school for CRNA. I will be working for a number of years and would like to improve myself. Do you know if anyone has began CRNA school in their 50's, and what are the schools take on older students? I would appreciate your honest thoughts. Thank you in advance for your opinions...
    ETRN......Try this thread...very encouraging!

    https://allnurses.com/forums/showthread.php?t=91695
  5. by   CRNAMASTER
    I was 44 when I started working on my BSN after working as an ICU nurse then a PACU nurse. I have been accepted as a TCU student for this fall prior to that I was a KU alternate so it is never to late as far as I am concerned. I am now 48 will be 49 when I start then 52 when we finish. I was going to give it up last summer when a freind of mine said never, never give up on your dream especially one that you are so qualified to do. So if you perservere you will make it. GC
  6. by   mwbeah
    Quote from etrn1
    I am a late bloomer and became a RN at the ripe old age of 43. I had prevoiusly worked as a OR and Anes. tech. I have spent the past 8 years working ICU as a staff nurse and as a travel nurse. I am now 51 and am considering going back to school for CRNA. I will be working for a number of years and would like to improve myself. Do you know if anyone has began CRNA school in their 50's, and what are the schools take on older students? I would appreciate your honest thoughts. Thank you in advance for your opinions...
    I say go for it, but you will be required to have your BSN to proceed.

    Mike
  7. by   sproutsfriend
    I was 39 before I pursued CRNA school. And, there's an old ancient guy (Trauma Tom) in the class behind me. He has the inside scoop on geriatric anesthesia because he's of that age.
  8. by   LNsrna
    If you've done your homework, and feel passionate about pursuing your own dream, I say never, ever give up. There's a lifetime in everyday and you many of those ahead ofyou. Good luck!
  9. by   JVanRN
    25...anything after that well is just to old....NOT I'm just kidding, Many of the best nursing students were the older ones because they usually had some sort of experience in some other area that enriched them...not even in the medical field. 40 something is definatley NOT to old. Maybe if you were like 80 then that might be pushing it. Good luck in whatever you decide.
  10. by   hcmanp
    In 2 years, you'll be 53. You can be 53 with a new degree, or 53 without.
    With retirement ages going up, you will still have AT LEAST 15 years in the field to either enjoy what you are doing, or regret what you might have done differently. Go for it!
  11. by   czechmate
    Quote from hcmanp
    In 2 years, you'll be 53. You can be 53 with a new degree, or 53 without.
    With retirement ages going up, you will still have AT LEAST 15 years in the field to either enjoy what you are doing, or regret what you might have done differently. Go for it!
    Well said!
    After 10 or 15 years of working as a CRNA, you'll be way past your payback period, so it is a financial no-brainer. I suspect you'll enjoy the work better, so go for it.

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