Experienced CRNA...ask me anything - page 15

Okay...If you've read my posts you know that I will be retiring soon. Now is your chance to ask a practicing CRNA anything. 12 years of experience from solo rural independent to... Read More

  1. by   06crna
    Quote from ICUman
    How common is it for CRNA's in the hospital setting to be directly employed as a hospital employee, vs. working for a separate anesthesia company that contracts to provide services in the hospital?
    Relatively rare.
  2. by   06crna
    Quote from ICUman
    Do you think AA's create job competition or threaten CRNA's job prospects at all?
    Honestly? Both No and Yes. I will give one example of each. There are many more.


    1. Because CRNAs who are discussing the fact that CRNAs can practice independently and AAs cannot are missing this stunningly obvious fact: AAs practice in urban/suburban areas...concentrated in areas with AA programs. If AAs were eliminated, would CRNAs be practicing in those locations independently? With no anesthesiologist on staff? NO. Would their salaries skyrocket? NO.

    2. One thing that threatens job prospects? CRNAs with militant, contentious attitudes who interview at mixed AA/CRNA practices. Of course the anesthesiologists preferentially hire AAs in that circumstance. Why would any hiring manager choose a problem personality?

    We, as CRNAs, should be far more concerned about the quality, quantity, and expense of nurse anesthesia training programs than what the twelve AA programs who graduate a few hundred AAs/year are doing. Our profession has caused many of our job problems. AAs are not a problem.

    Here is the honest truth from what I see as a current preceptor of both AA and CRNA students in their 20s and 30s and a current interim manager. It matters not whether the provider is an AA or a CRNA. The interviewees want to know three things: 1. How much will I make? 2. What are my hours? 3. How much vacation?

    That is the new reality of the millenial workforce that I have met. No one I have interviewed has any intention of moving to BFE for any amount of money. They want a home close to conveniences, mid-6 figure salary + 6 weeks vacation, and work/life balance.
    Last edit by 06crna on Sep 20
  3. by   wtbcrna
    On AAs:

    1. Like the majority of CRNAs I don't see the need nor do I support AA practice. IMHO AAs are there as a tool for the ASA to try to control anesthesia practices and keep CRNAs salaries low in order to increase anesthesiologist salaries.
    2. I have worked with AAs as part of my military trauma training. I was unimpressed as were many of the CRNAs that worked at that particular facility.
    3. AAs do not increase services and increase costs overall.
    4. I tend to be open minded, but when a product is put out that is designed to be dependent and less functional than the original product that is already in place with no shortages in supply I feel no reason for anyone to support said product. What you then have to wonder is why a replacement product/AAs is being pushed by the manufacture/ASA so readily, and the sole reason that is is money and control.
    Five reasons that anesthesiologist assistants limit anesthesia flexibility and profitability
  4. by   06crna
    Quote from wtbcrna
    On AAs:

    1. Like the majority of CRNAs I don't see the need nor do I support AA practice. IMHO AAs are there as a tool for the ASA to try to control anesthesia practices and keep CRNAs salaries low in order to increase anesthesiologist salaries.
    2. I have worked with AAs as part of my military trauma training. I was unimpressed as were many of the CRNAs that worked at that particular facility.
    3. AAs do not increase services and increase costs overall.
    4. I tend to be open minded, but when a product is put out that is designed to be dependent and less functional than the original product that is already in place with no shortages in supply I feel no reason for anyone to support said product. What you then have to wonder is why a replacement product/AAs is being pushed by the manufacture/ASA so readily, and the sole reason that is is money and control.
    Five reasons that anesthesiologist assistants limit anesthesia flexibility and profitability
    1. Are you citing data that surveyed the majority opinion?
    2. Your experience differs from mine.
    3. Impossible to apply that statement to all situations/settings in which AAs work.
    4. Our own profession is producing new graduates with major gaps in their knowledge base, limited/no regional anesthesia/pediatric/neonatal/trauma experience, and no ability to think critically or practice independently. At the same time, the price of that education can exceed $150,000 - $200,000 for TUITION alone.

    PS. The article appeared in an industry magazine that is light on factual data and heavy on advertising.
    If nurse anesthetists can stand on their own, then why resort to adopting the same title as their physician counterparts by calling themselves "nurse anesthesiologists", as the author does?
  5. by   wtbcrna
    Quote from 06crna
    1. Are you citing data that surveyed the majority opinion?
    2. Your experience differs from mine.
    3. Impossible to apply that statement to all situations/settings in which AAs work.
    4. Our own profession is producing new graduates with major gaps in their knowledge base, limited/no regional anesthesia/pediatric/neonatal/trauma experience, and no ability to think critically or practice independently. At the same time, the price of that education can exceed $150,000 - $200,000 for TUITION alone.

    PS. The article appeared in an industry magazine that is light on factual data and heavy on advertising.
    If nurse anesthetists can stand on their own, then why resort to adopting the same title as their physician counterparts by calling themselves "nurse anesthesiologists", as the author does?
    1. Informal sampling of many CRNAs. Also, the fact the AANA is representative of CRNAs and the AANA does not support AAs.
    2. I imagine my experience differs from most non-military CRNAs, but I always make a point to work in the civilian sector no matter where I am stationed.
    3. That statement is a fact for all ACT/directed practices, which is where AAs work. The only anesthesia model that is more expensive is anesthesiologist only model.
    4. That is your opinion that doesn't hold up well to facts. The new graduates have higher standards than previous years graduates.

    P.S. There are many reasons why that came about, but if anesthesiologists can stand on their own why did they adopt the "physician anesthesiologist" title?. That argument works both ways.

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