do crna's have prescriptiion benefits?

  1. I was just wondering if CRNA's can prescribe any medications outside of the OR. Do CRNA's have a DEA# like all md's???
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    About CCRNERIC

    Joined: Jan '05; Posts: 15
    ICU RN

    10 Comments

  3. by   jwk
    Quote from CCRNERIC
    I was just wondering if CRNA's can prescribe any medications outside of the OR. Do CRNA's have a DEA# like all md's???
    Depends entirely on state law.
  4. by   Kiwi
    Even when practicing in the OR, do CRNAs have a DEA?
  5. by   jwk
    Quote from ether
    Even when practicing in the OR, do CRNAs have a DEA?
    I don't think you need one in most states. You're not really prescribing per se.
  6. by   Tenesma
    depends on the state laws...

    refer to the following chart for info

    http://www.nursingworld.org/gova/charts/dea.htm

    gives you an idea...
  7. by   Kiwi
    Quote from Tenesma
    depends on the state laws...

    refer to the following chart for info

    http://www.nursingworld.org/gova/charts/dea.htm

    gives you an idea...
    Very interesting chart - thanks
  8. by   athomas91
    interesting chart - thanks...
    question is ...is it the state you are licensed in or the state you work in that dictates?? for example - i live in maryland but maryland license allows me to work in PA and or Delaware... i am going to work in PA - will PA rules apply or MD??? i am assuming the licensing state.
  9. by   Tenesma
    DEA licensing is granted to those who qualify and apply and pay the fee contingent on the following

    1) must be permitted by the state's laws as a mid-level practitioner to prescribe controlled substances (Schedule II-V). Here is the DEA sanctioned table: http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/dr...ers/index.html

    2) must be licensed within that state to practice - and have a license number

    3) must be able to obtain the individual state's controlled substance license

    4) then just apply - understanding that some state's allow fully prescriptive rights (ie: alaska) without supervision whereas some require that you follow protocols and sign scopes of practice

    Now this only applies to controlled substances. If you want to prescribe other medications: ie: insulin, metoprolol, protonix, diflucan, birth control pills. Your prescription rights are again controlled by the state and is up to each pharmacy/pharmacist to determine whether the drug prescribed falls within your scope of practice.... for example a pharmacy may refuse to fill your prescription for uncle bob's chemotherapy as that doesn't fall within a CRNAs scope of practice (and surprisingly individual pharmacists as well as pharmacy chains have the right to randomly deny based on that)...

    However, from a legal point of view - if you were to prescribe a birth control pill to a patient/family friend/relative and something were to occur and this case were to present itself in the court of law - you will be held liable for malpractice unless you can show that 1) the person is a provable patient of yours (has an H&P in your office) 2) you have examined the patient at one point or time 3) the medication you prescribed is within your scope of practice 4) and other evidence proving a patient-practitioner relationship.
    (that is why those online pharmacies that prescribe viagra, etc... are suck risky schemes because the online prescriber is very, very liable for malpractice). Also why, it is very dangerous (risky to your license) to prescribe for non-patients (family members, friends).
  10. by   BigDave
    Here in Texas I obtained my NP license then had to apply separately for my "limited prescriptive authority." I do not have a DEA number. Myself, and the MDs that work with me, have provider numbers registered by the hospital we work in. I think tenesma is on target with what is the rule here--I only prescribe what in the scope of my practice and have an established relationship. The corridor consult is something we often do for co-workers, but it is a risk because a patient/provider relationship is established.
  11. by   air
    Quote from athomas91
    interesting chart - thanks...
    question is ...is it the state you are licensed in or the state you work in that dictates?? for example - i live in maryland but maryland license allows me to work in PA and or Delaware... i am going to work in PA - will PA rules apply or MD??? i am assuming the licensing state.
    This might be a seperate issue, I am not sure, PA is not part of the Compact States. I have a Maryland license, but I had to obtain a seperate Pa license for practice priviledges. As for De, I do not know if it has changed yet,as late as 2000, I had to maintain a seperate license also for practice in that State.
    I always followed the rules in the State in which I was practicing at the time. When I accepted travel assignments out of the mid-atlantic area, I observed the nursing practice Acts of the State in which I practiced.
  12. by   athomas91
    air, thanks for the reply - i plan on working in PA for at least 3 yrs exclusively so i guess i will apply for a PA license....

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