Are there presentations/public speaking in CRNA school?

  1. I'm one of those that is still petrified at the thought of giving presentations in school. I'm curious to know whether this is a part of the CRNA curriculum.
  2. Visit futurenp profile page

    About futurenp

    Joined: Jul '03; Posts: 90; Likes: 3

    9 Comments

  3. by   Pete495
    Well, I can tell you this. In all of my Master's classes thus far, I've had to get up and do a presentation in every single one of them, if not two, at least one. It's not my favorite thing to do either, and I imagine this is the case for most nurse anesthetists, but It's part of getting any graduate degree, so I guess you should prepare yourself for public speaking. The best way to tackle it is to do as many as you can so that you become comfortable
  4. by   rn29306
    In the past, I was the kid who turned beet red in middle school and to some part, even high school even if called on in class to answer a question. I myself didn't ask many questions for this reason. Gradually I grew out of this at some point during HS and college.
    You will change when you get to being a SRNA. You have to converse with MDs and MDAs in an intelligent manner constantly. People look for you to lead in most cases and patients expect you to stand up and protect them or interdict on their behalf. Often this makes someone else, most likely a surgeon or circulator wait or stop what he or she is doing. Imagine a room full of people watching you intubate and perform your induction, it ratteles you at first, then becomes no big deal. You will be just fine.

    I share one class that is made up mostly of pre-crna students and pre-np students. These guys don't say a peep in class and for the most part, it is a discussion class. The people already in the rotations, myself included, have no problem talking for 5-10 minutes on the spot and presentations are no big deal.
  5. by   SproutRN
    Quote from futurenp
    I'm one of those that is still petrified at the thought of giving presentations in school. I'm curious to know whether this is a part of the CRNA curriculum.
    I can't speak for other programs but in my program I have had to do several presentations throughout the program. And still have a few more to do before graduation.

    Sprout
  6. by   jewelcutt
    We have many presentations to do, most before our own classmates. It's no big deal once you get get the hand of it. I'm actually one of the ones who has no problem speaking in front of others. However, one of my classmates who presented today had to run into the women's bathroom to drink out of the tap because he was so nervous. I have a hard time understanding it. Your classmates are very supportive so there's nothing to be nervous about, even when speaking in an auditorium full of CRNAs and MDAs everyone is very supportive.
  7. by   futurenp
    Yikes...an auditorium.....now I'm really nervous!
  8. by   Law of Fives
    Quote from jewelcutt
    However, one of my classmates who presented today had to run into the women's bathroom to drink out of the tap because he was so nervous. I have a hard time understanding it.
    'He' ran into a 'Her' bathroom? Oh my
    It's a physiologic response that is almost as uncontrollable as some reflexes making it seem to be a reflex itself. There are some techniques to dealing with it, I speak from experience. Had it so bad that the visual problems (blurry vision) were overwelming. Being comfortable with the audience can help, but another fundamental technique to deal with it, IMHO, is to practice the presentation to become as familiar with not only the content, but the delivery. There are other techniques: Biofeedback, distraction techniques, and medication if everything else doesn't work. During my last educational endeavor, we had about 3 presentations a week. They weren't major presentation, just had to be about 10minutes long, and the only visuals required were a typed report. I eventually got used to public speaking, and see how achieving that can come in handy. hth
  9. by   ICUGirl
    I also have a terrible time doing public speaking. I don't know what it is. I think its a fear of looking stupid in front of your peers and even potential co-workers. This fear of public speaking prevents me from furthering my education. I don't know how I got through nursing school. It's strange. I don't have a problem talking to people, though I'm more introverted than I am extroverted. I have a problem speaking in front of a crowd. I don't have a problem talking to doctors or even confronting them when necessary. I feel I'm good with communicating with my patients and their families, etc...but when it comes time to talk in front of an audience, I become terrified. I sweat, I shake, I forget what I'm supposed to say, I feel like an idiot. Sometimes I wonder why there has to be public speaking in order to complete the program. I want to be a CRNA; not an instructor or public speaker. Is that a bad attitude or what?!
  10. by   futurenp
    No..that's exactly the way I feel. I'm determined that I'm going to try to conquer this! I've even taken beta blockers for speeches, but they didn't really help much. I'm the same way - have no problems with communicating to small groups, but get me in front of a class and I have a panic attack! I'm thinking of joining Toastmasters. Have you considered that?
  11. by   TexasCCRN
    Quote from futurenp
    No..that's exactly the way I feel. I'm determined that I'm going to try to conquer this! I've even taken beta blockers for speeches, but they didn't really help much. I'm the same way - have no problems with communicating to small groups, but get me in front of a class and I have a panic attack! I'm thinking of joining Toastmasters. Have you considered that?

    I think everyone goes through anxiety at first when speaking in front of groups. The best cure for anxiety is preparation. If you know the material very well it usually works. Practice over and over again in your house, in front of your dog, husband, wife, etc. Although the dog will look at you like you are crazy it helps. And at first when speaking to a group, don't look at anyone in the eye...it will throw you off. Look at different spots, their shirt, forehead. It looks like you are interacting, but aren't. After you speak several times you will become comfortable enough to look at people and take questions. Good Luck to everyone who has this problem. You can overcome it!

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