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Central Lines and EZ IO needs

Nurses   (2,185 Views 9 Comments)
by flightnursetaylor flightnursetaylor (New Member) New Member

1,578 Visitors; 18 Posts

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I am an instructor for a Paramedic Education program as well as an educator for our Air Medical Team and I am a prn national speaker for critical care in EMS. I would really love to get my own inventory of vascular access: central lines, PICCs, Port-a-caths, Quinton catheters, IO accessetc. I have my requests in to the area hospital supply departments, etc but I was going to try on this site. I am willing pay out of pocket for expired vascular access of all kinds. I am also in charge of giving a presentation on EZ IO with which I was given a 4 hour time slot. I can do EZ IO instruction in 30 minutes so I am in need of filler for the extra time. Anyone have any insider tips that they could contribute to my presentation? Full credit will be given.

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and works as a Emergency / Trauma Nurse.

3 Followers; 3 Articles; 145,847 Visitors; 20,896 Posts

You might try the companies themselves for expired access devices, tubings, dressings, and bags. Hopsitals return them to the companies for credit. As far as filler time, supplied with plenty of anti-bacterial wipes and gloves, I always used chicken legs for practice (fat part of the leg to simulate ositioning). They are very similar in the feel of an actual IO. I would hook them up to IV tubing and an IV bag filled with a food colored water (I sometimes had to use a light pressure bag)to show extravasation andthat they don't always free flow. It would be a strictly volunteer basis "for fun"......then plan a break so we all can wash up.....Goodluck

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1,578 Visitors; 18 Posts

thank you so much! I am traveling out of state to do this class but if I can get to a supermarket nearby, I think I will go ahead and try it.

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rkitty198 has 11 years experience and works as a Nurse-BSN-CMS.

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I just went through a class of IV teaching and what really made things interesting was seeing pictures of IV's infiltrated, inserted incorrectly, without caps, phlebitis, ect. I couldn't believe some people would put in an IV going proximal to distal (facing down towards the fingers). I am a sucker for a "what not to do" presentation. I am also a visual hands on person, so the chicken is a great idea!

Of course you have your comics and jokes to throw in there too.

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1,578 Visitors; 18 Posts

EMS folks are very visual with a lot of ADD/ADHD thrown into the mix. thanks for the feedback. I did contact the Bard representative and she is supposed to be calling me back. I do have some comics for relief but I think pictures of what NOT to do is an excellent idea. thanks! Keep the suggestions coming!

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2 Articles; 13,812 Visitors; 11,114 Posts

A little advice: Do NOT show pictures or demonstrations of what NOT to do. Visual images stick in the mind, and at some point somebody will, in a hurried moment, do exactly what you DON'T want them to do because it's in their minds. I think it's Nursing magazine (or maybe RN, I forget) that has a do's and don'ts feature every issue; they used to show an illustration of the don'ts, and it made me crazy so one day I wrote to them and said, "You can use words to describe the "don't," but use the illustrations only for the "do." Darned if they haven't done it that way ever since :).

Exception: one of the most brilliant anti-demos I ever saw was in a Boy Scout training session on how to teach new Scouts how to prepare for an overnight hike. Of course, the audience was all very experienced at this, and the instructor knew it, so when he came onstage dressed in suit and tie, in hard patent-leather shoes, carrying an IMMENSE pair of plastic garbage bags stuffed with waaaaaay too much stuff and inappropriate stuff-- a Weber grille, a complete PlayStation, a football, a pink Barbie sleep-over sleeping bag, enough junk food for an army, three gallon jugs of water, every camping reference book ever written ... well, you get the picture. Completely and over-the-top ridiculous is entertaining in a presentation like this, so nobody can possibly mistake it for actual advice.

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1,578 Visitors; 18 Posts

excellent point! I will make sure and avoid the DON'T pictures. That really is great advice.

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rkitty198 has 11 years experience and works as a Nurse-BSN-CMS.

5,896 Visitors; 420 Posts

Okay I guess if you got an entire magazine to change it's ways avoid the dont's then don't do it :) Personally I like them and just because I see it dosent mean I will insert an iv into the finger the wrong direction or attempt to access a port a cath with an 18 gauge needle- hehe just kiddin.

I guess there is a good point there, that if these are people who are new to this then it makes sense to leave them out. I swear every idea I come up with on this site gets shot down :) guess I really suck in that department.

My hubby is a firefighter and has done an io and he was so proud of that day! By the way they also were shown pics of what not to do, and I guess like a car accident nothing draws the attention better than a gory picture.

Good luck OP! You will do great!

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iluvivt has 32 years experience and works as a Infusion specialtist.

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You can pm me about some CVC samples. Also there is so much to vascular access.infusion and infusion therapies..if you could narrow it down a bit I can give you a lot of ideas. Are your main concerns in obtaining access,monitoring and care of all types of CVCs,port access and care,troubleshooting all complications. Do you want to talk about prevention of CRBSI,maximal barrier precautions,SHEA/IDSA guidelines,CDC guidelines, per INS standards.prevention of CRT. What is your main goal or concern? Personally ,I do not agree with not showing pictures of devasting results that can occur from poor nursing care or showing pictures of a simple or complex infiltration/extravastion. It helps RNs realize that complications can have horrible life long effects and most are preventable.

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