Is this possible?

  1. Question for all you CCU nurses we debated this at work tonight: is it possible to have a Q wave on an ECG and not have any existing cardiac disease? Does a benign or non-pathological Q wave exist?
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    About HillNPStudent

    Joined: Apr '05; Posts: 92
    RN-Critical Care
    Specialty: Med-surg, Critical Care

    3 Comments

  3. by   ALCCRN
    Q waves are normal on an EKG as long as the are no bigger than 0.04 seconds (one baby box). They are called physiologic Q waves.
  4. by   HillNPStudent
    Quote from ALCCRN
    Q waves are normal on an EKG as long as the are no bigger than 0.04 seconds (one baby box). They are called physiologic Q waves.

    Well, this was our debate...is it measured in width or amplitude? Most of our nurses said 0.04 seconds in width was the standard, one nurse argued that it was how far depressed the Q wave was. I was under the impression it was width of the Q wave?

    Anyone have an example they could post to show?
  5. by   ALCCRN
    i couldn't google any pictures on it...but this is what i found...

    "normal q-waves reflect normal septal activation (beginning on the lv septum); they are narrow (<0.04s duration) and small (<25% the amplitude of the r wave). they are often seen in leads i and avl when the qrs axis is to the left of +60o, and in leads ii, iii, avf when the qrs axis is to the right of +60o. septal q waves should not be confused with the pathologic q waves of myocardial infarction"

    http://medlib.med.utah.edu/kw/ecg/ecg_outline/lesson3/index.html

    it sounds like you both might be right....

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