Anyone read "AACN Essentials of Progressive Care Nursing"?

  1. Looking for comments on "AACN Essentials of Progressive Care Nursing." If you've also read "Short Stay Management of Heart Failure" please contrast the two as tele nursing primers. TIA!
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    About anonymurse

    Joined: Jul '04; Posts: 1,071; Likes: 1,013
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    9 Comments

  3. by   anonymurse
    Well I figured I'd spoil myself and get both plus "Cardiovascular Physiology Concepts," now reading "The Only EKG Book You'll Ever Need"--any other book junkies out there let me know what else you consider good tele reading, TIA!
  4. by   GoldenFire5
    Quote from anonymurse
    Looking for comments on "AACN Essentials of Progressive Care Nursing." If you've also read "Short Stay Management of Heart Failure" please contrast the two as tele nursing primers. TIA!
    I bought the Essentials of Progressive Care Nursing book when I was studying for the NCLEX. I really like it - it packages complex information in a way that is very easy to understand. I know I'm going to use it as a reference book for many years to come.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    I didn't buy it. I do recommend From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice by Patricia Benner. And her other books.

    http://www.amazon.com/Novice-Expert-.../dp/0130325228

    http://www.powells.com/s?kw=Patricia...&x=39&y=11#all
  6. by   anonymurse
    Quote from spacenurse
    I didn't buy it. I do recommend From Novice to Expert: Excellence and Power in Clinical Nursing Practice by Patricia Benner. And her other books.
    Yah, that was awesome. Until I read it, I couldn't figure out why I upset my instructors. I guess they read it and their understanding of it was that in the first stage, students had to display blind, eager obedience and not ask questions that couldn't be answered in terms of rules. Things were a lot easier once I knew where they were coming from.

    The only thing about the book that doesn't seem right is the idea that when going to a new job, we drop back down to the level we were before we got our first job, then have to work our way back up to expertise, and it takes the same length of time to get there. None of that matches what I see.

    One cool thing about it is the parallel with Kohlberg's stages of moral development. Seems like people recapitulate that general life progression when they acclimate to new skills, jobs, and organizations.
  7. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from anonymurse
    Yah, that was awesome. Until I read it, I couldn't figure out why I upset my instructors. I guess they read it and their understanding of it was that in the first stage, students had to display blind, eager obedience and not ask questions that couldn't be answered in terms of rules. Things were a lot easier once I knew where they were coming from.

    The only thing about the book that doesn't seem right is the idea that when going to a new job, we drop back down to the level we were before we got our first job, then have to work our way back up to expertise, and it takes the same length of time to get there. None of that matches what I see.

    One cool thing about it is the parallel with Kohlberg's stages of moral development. Seems like people recapitulate that general life progression when they acclimate to new skills, jobs, and organizations.
    I think she meant we become novice level again when going to a different specialty.
    I know I would be a complete novice in L&D, Peds, or NICU after decades of adult care.
  8. by   anonymurse
    Quote from spacenurse
    I think she meant we become novice level again when going to a different specialty.
    I know I would be a complete novice in L&D, Peds, or NICU after decades of adult care.
    Well I figure it was made a taste extreme for the sake of the model's clarity, but really it seems that migrants take more and more with them as they move about. I mean after 20 years in the hospital in half a dozen units, that's still 20 years of working with diabetes, IVs, assessments, calling doctors, resolving family probs, networking, you know.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from anonymurse
    Well I figure it was made a taste extreme for the sake of the model's clarity, but really it seems that migrants take more and more with them as they move about. I mean after 20 years in the hospital in half a dozen units, that's still 20 years of working with diabetes, IVs, assessments, calling doctors, resolving family probs, networking, you know.
    It has been years since the second time I read it.

    I work registry and know I provide good care to my patients. I'm not as efficient as when I work at my "home' hospital of >25 years.
    As a CNS told be in a CCU, "I can tell you've been there, done that."
    It's still always best to check the policy manual.

    Oh have you read the Echo Heron novels?
  10. by   anonymurse
    Nope, been reading policies <g>.
  11. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from anonymurse
    Nope, been reading policies <g>.

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