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Can I Get A Priest? Running Out Of Time!

Nurses Article   (7,003 Views 24 Comments 1,412 Words)
by spotangel spotangel (Member) Writer Innovator

2 Likes; 23 Articles; 31,657 Visitors; 208 Posts

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Dying patient, family requesting spiritual care, after hours, no one answering calls, running out of time! You are reading page 2 of Can I Get A Priest? Running Out Of Time!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

2 Likes; 23 Articles; 31,657 Visitors; 208 Posts

Of course if the person needed a doctor, and you called a retired doctor with Alzheimer's, that would be a major legal issue, which of course you know, and would never do.

LOL!

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CapeCodMermaid has 30+ years experience and works as a DNS.

18 Likes; 1 Follower; 59,175 Visitors; 6,004 Posts

I've worked on buildings where priests were residents. They were still of great comfort to other residents.

What bothered ME about this story: why are you signing for all the narcotics? The nurses on the unit should be the ones signing them in. The fewer hands they go through, the less chance there is for diversion.

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2 Likes; 23 Articles; 31,657 Visitors; 208 Posts

The protocol in this LTC was that the Nursing Supervisor(me) on the off shift, would get all the narcotics from the pharmacy, count them and then sign off on the pharmacy slip and give it back to the pharmacy driver who came from an outside pharmacy. I then would log all the narcotics and write which unit they were for. I would then stack them by units and call the nurses to come pick up their narcs. The nurses would come, count their narcs and sign off with date and time on the log book. They would take their narcs to their units and log them in their log book and lock them up in their narcotic cabinet.

This way it was easy to trace any missing narcs. I believe many years before narcs disappeared on a routine basis and a change was made. This counting was a pain but a necessary step to help the patients who needed it. Of course, coming for a pyxsis hosp it took a little getting used to!!

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TriciaJ has 35 years experience as a RN and works as a Retired.

1,107 Likes; 5 Followers; 30,813 Visitors; 2,770 Posts

They were Baptist but requested a priest? This whole story sounds "off". The misplaced apostrophes don't help, but that's just me being pedantic. Sorry to be the curmudgeon in the crowd. I'm just not quite buying this.

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71 Likes; 5,447 Visitors; 393 Posts

I can't speak to whether what you did was "right or wrong" professionally, but what I can speak to is if I were a dying patient I would've wanted you to do for me what you did for him.

I'm a non-denominational Christian, and while not everyone would find this acceptable, I personally could care less what denomination the Pastor or Priest was, heck I would have even been happy to have a Rabbi or Imam bless me before I took my last breath. I'm going to God anyway, let whatever holy man is available bless & pray for me and my soul on my way out. I understand for many if not most people that is completely taboo and a no-no, but for me and others like me, it would bring me some peace & I think you brought this man some peace.

Edited by MiladyMalarkey

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2 Likes; 23 Articles; 31,657 Visitors; 208 Posts

TriciaJ, with all due respect, the family did not care at that point who saw the dying patient as long as they were a religious leader. I did ask them if they had a pastor that they wanted to call but both daughters did not have a name or number to call. One of them asked me if a priest was available as they were aware that pastoral care was part of our LTC and came to visit patients especially our Hospice patients regularly.

I am not sure of my misplaced apostrophes--but I am willing to learn and improve if you let me know on this forum or as a private message.

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6 Likes; 45,108 Visitors; 4,978 Posts

To OP & CCM - that narc sign-in procedure is identical to my last facility. It was considered one more layer of oversight for loss prevention.

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NRSKarenRN has 40 years experience as a BSN and works as a Registered Nurse, Home Health.

106 Likes; 5 Followers; 7 Articles; 159,095 Visitors; 14,359 Posts

Thank you for you advocating for this patient. I would have done the same since time was of the essence to provide spiritual support to dying patient and his family. Having worked hospice, I made it a point to identify spiritual contact on first visit--- but when your first visit finds client actively dying and wanting prayer, you think outside the box to get spiritual need fulfilled when requested by pt/family.

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302 Visitors; 2 Posts

I thought it was a Brilliant Idea, both the patient and the priest were blessed.

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779 Visitors; 10 Posts

There seems to be a lot of hair splitting and Monday morning quarterbacking. If the family and patient were okay with the nursing and pastoral care that you gave them that is all that is important. As far as the policy for counting narcotics that is policy driven by the facility. I would be thankful for what peace and calm that they were given. Also the Father with dementia seemed to gain by the interaction. You are the kind of nurse that I hope I am in any similar situation. Kudos!

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BlueDawnRN has 5 years experience as a BSN.

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Beautiful story. Things happened as they were meant to. Thank you for helping this man to have a more peaceful death and for helping the family to be at peace with his death.

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64 Visitors; 1 Post

Brings back some memorable experiences including recently when my Sister died. We are Catholics and shared a silence of prayers which were all answered and she died 3 hours later. God has been with me all through my nursing career, even now as I care for my wife and others. My motto has always been," Nursing is the Gentle Art of Caring" God bless all Nurses. Remember- Doctors order, Nurses care, God heals.

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