Dirt bike camp

  1. Hey there!! I was wondering if anyone has ever been the nurse at a dirt bike (or another off-road vehicle type of camp).
    My 15-year-old is an avid dirt bike racer. He is going to camp in a couple weeks and one of the nurses just found out she can no longer go. I've just agreed to fill in as the second camp nurse. I'm a PICU nurse and have no experience with camp nursing.
    Does anyone have any pearls of wisdom?
    Thanks!!
  2. Visit JamiePedsRN profile page

    About JamiePedsRN, BSN

    Joined: Sep '12; Posts: 17; Likes: 3

    15 Comments

  3. by   Wuzzie
  4. by   Wuzzie
    Mods were faster than I thought!
    Last edit by Wuzzie on Jun 25
  5. by   Alex Egan
    Medication management is the big part of camp. Make sure you have a consistent medication administration routine. Make sure you have a consent to treat on file for each camper. First aid and emergency response is a minor portion, important, but minor. Set med times, and times for sick call. Then make sure people know how to get ahold of you for emergencies. If you don't portion out your day you will be giving breakfast meds at noon and dealing with "sick" walk ins around the clock. Emergencies can come in whenever. Minor stuff can wait until sick call.
  6. by   JamiePedsRN
    I like that blanket roll splint! Thank you Wuzzie!
  7. by   JamiePedsRN
    I'm hoping a camp full of dirt bikers means they're pretty tough and won't come to see me for too many minor complaints ( :
    We shall see, I could be way off on that one!
  8. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Alex Egan
    First aid and emergency response is a minor portion, important, but minor.
    I would agree with you for a regular camp but this is a dirt bike camp. Entirely different animal. Crazy, fearless boys on dirt bikes! First Aid isn't heavily covered in nursing school if at all. We have a camp like this at our local ski resort in the summer. Trust me first aid is a big, big part of it.
  9. by   JamiePedsRN
    Also, for a fun twist. There is no wifi or phone service!
  10. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from JamiePedsRN
    Also, for a fun twist. There is no wifi or phone service!
    Smoke signals?
  11. by   Charge200J
    Sounds like fun! Definitely organize med pass times for campers. As for first aid: I'd make sure to have lots of ice packs and simple bandaging for abrasions. Encourage counselors to frequently remind their campers about staying hydrated and taking breaks. Lastly, just in case, consider learning how to properly size and apply a cervical collar and provide c-spine/spinal precautions - hopefully you'll never have to use it...but depending on how rural this camp is it could take EMS a bit of time to arrive for a really bad dirt bike accident.
  12. by   Wuzzie
    Quote from Charge200J
    Lastly, just in case, consider learning how to properly size and apply a cervical collar and provide c-spine/spinal precautions - hopefully you'll never have to use it...but depending on how rural this camp is it could take EMS a bit of time to arrive for a really bad dirt bike accident.
    OMG! Don't get me started on this. I've been applying c-collars since I was 14 years old (now in my 50's). Do NOT base the size of the collar on the size of the kid. Always, always measure. An improperly fitted collar is worse than no collar at all. Case in point. I am about 5' 5", 130lbs and fine-boned. Because of my small-boned appearance and average to shortish stature everyone tries to put me in a small collar. The thing is if you size me I take a TALL! My neck is very long and slender. Also, the foam on the inside of the collar is designed to be directly against the skin for maximum stability so cut that shirt. You also need to learn how to remove a helmet while maintaining c-spines. It's not hard. Just futsy. And lastly, nobody should be kept on a spine board for longer than 30 minutes. They're primary purpose is to safely move a patient.They can really do a number to the tissue over the sacrum and other bony prominences. Many places are going to vacuum boards for this reason. In the ED they are usually removed upon arrival. So if you have more than a few minutes before rescue arrives better to manually stabilize the head after the collar is placed and leave the patient on the ground/cot with a firm mattress. The only time I stray from this is an unconscious patient. They often vomit and you can roll them way faster if they're on a board. Aspiration pneumonia trumps pressure sores in my book. I would advise you to familiarize yourself with the equipment you'll have available. C-collars, strap system for backboard and CID because there are more than a few versions out there. This experience sounds like it could be way fun!
  13. by   Wuzzie
    Found this little nugget of information.

    Injuries in the competitive paediatric motocross athlete


    So you might also add traction splinting to your reading list.
  14. by   offlabel
    I only have experience with chain saw juggling camp...sorry..

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