BSN to DNP

Posted
by serenity serenity (New) New Nurse

Hello all! I have only been a nurse for almost half a year and I’m already thinking of going back to school (I know I know). Has anyone went from BSN straight to DNP? Would you recommend it? I work with babies and possibly thinking about going into pediatrics NP but I heard it might be better to do FNP. I don’t really know what I’m looking for here but maybe anyone’s experience with deciding on going back for their DNP? Thank you!

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB. 18 Articles; 13,671 Posts

Hello @serenity,

We moved your topic to the Student NP forum for the best response.

Good luck with your Nursing career decisions.

JBMmom, MSN, NP

Specializes in New Critical care NP, Critical care, Med-surg, LTC. Has 10 years experience. 4 Articles; 2,278 Posts

Being so early in your career, I think you're trying to make a very big decision with limited insight into your options. I don't mean just message board opinions, you really want to see what some of the career options out there are before committing so much time and money. I know that when I was deciding to go back I didn't see the return on investment for a DNP vs MSN/NP. The program is twice the cost and if you're going to practice clinically, there is no change in pay generally for NP vs DNP. I know that I don't want to teach and I'm not going into research, and currently the entry into practice is MSN. There has been talk for many years of the DNP becoming the entry level for practice, but I don't see that happening any time soon. Good luck with your career and education choices.

DrCOVID

DrCOVID, DNP

Specializes in psych/medical-surgical. Has 13 years experience. 461 Posts

If you have a good grasp of ped nursing, I would start applying. The role of an NP vs RN is very different. RNs follow orders in the hospital. As a NP, you are diagnosing and prescribing treatments/medications. The job requires different knowledge and advanced assessment and application of knowledge. RN exp helps lay a solid foundation for the APRN.

There have been so many threads here about the MSN vs DNP vs MD as the poster above tries to point out. Regardless of the degree path, the most important thing is your preparation, clinical time/placements, and the reputation of the school. I would advise against FNP unless you are going to make your own business. Primary care is among the lowest compensated for multiple reasons and most people do FNP. Several friends that did the FNP/DNP seem to be at a loss for future work.

Despite all the hate in this forum for the DNP, it will give you extra clinical time and 1-2 years to prepare. You will also have leverage over other MSNs and won't have to return if something is required in the future for the MSNs to stubborn to complete an extra year or two or capstone which nearly all "doctors" have to do.

Edited by adammRN

ss21

ss21

16 Posts

Following this thread

zinaptl

zinaptl

22 Posts

Did you end up applying? I'm also new, I've been a nurse for six months now. By the time I actually start classes I'll have a full year of bedside and before I begin clinicals, I'll have 2 years at the bedside. 

Dajunia Gore

Dajunia Gore, BSN, RN

Has 5 years experience. 7 Posts

I am interested in applying to Georgia Southern BSN to DNP because I hear the MSN will go the same way as the Master of Science in Pharmacy which became a Doctor of Pharmacy.  Anyone else hearing the same?

 

serenity

serenity

5 Posts

On 2/5/2021 at 2:18 PM, zinaptl said:

Did you end up applying? I'm also new, I've been a nurse for six months now. By the time I actually start classes I'll have a full year of bedside and before I begin clinicals, I'll have 2 years at the bedside. 

No I haven't yet! Still unsure what I want to do

allie127

allie127, BSN

Specializes in Behavioral Health/ Mental Health. 12 Posts

like JBMmom stated above, the difference/benefit of DNP is if you are going into research or education. NP jobs will accept MSN and do not provided a monetary difference if you have a DNP. Yes, it is only a few years more of schooling if you go BSN-DNP. Which is not bad at all. However with the cost of student loans, and no pay difference for the job of NP. Is it worth it? and what do I want out of my degree? Those are the question I asked myself.

 

Personally now I am leaning towards going to school for my masters to become an PMHNP. It's a two year program. Which will be over quick and I will be an NP. I could do four years for my DNP, however I have no interest in teaching or doing research. My main push to become an NP is to work for myself.

 

I have seen an article that there will be a push for NPs to be DNP education level. However I doubt it. All levels of nurses are needed in one form or another.

chare

3,673 Posts

26 minutes ago, allie127 said:

[...]

I have seen an article that there will be a push for NPs to be DNP education level. However I doubt it. All levels of nurses are needed in one form or another.

This has been an ongoing discussion for nearly 20 years.  In 2004 the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) proposed implementation by 2015.  Aside from CRNAs, who will have to be doctorally prepared beginning in 2025, I am not aware of any of the other advanced practice nursing certifying organizations planning on implementing this requirement. 

In 2018 the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties committed to moving all entry level nurse practitioner programs to the doctoral level.  When I was researching programs a few years ago, several universities were moving towards this.  In my opinion, this is how this is going to happen.  If it does happen, I suspect that masters prepared practitioners will be allowed to continue practicing.

Best wishes.

amoLucia

amoLucia

Specializes in retired LTC. 7,735 Posts

8 hours ago, allie127 said:

   .....  Personally now I am leaning towards going to school for my masters to become an PMHNP. It's a two year program. Which will be over quick and I will be an NP. I could do four years for my DNP, however I have no interest in teaching or doing research. My main push to become an NP is to work for myself.

You say this now. But what about in 5 or 10 yrs??  Will your health hold out? Family and life circumstances stable for the long haul?

Never say never! Short of marrying royalty or winning a big Mega Lottery  things can change.

SopranoKris, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in Hospitalist Medicine. Has 7 years experience. 3,152 Posts

On 12/6/2020 at 9:53 PM, serenity said:

Hello all! I have only been a nurse for almost half a year and I’m already thinking of going back to school (I know I know). Has anyone went from BSN straight to DNP? Would you recommend it? I work with babies and possibly thinking about going into pediatrics NP but I heard it might be better to do FNP. I don’t really know what I’m looking for here but maybe anyone’s experience with deciding on going back for their DNP? Thank you!

USA has a BSN-to-DNP program in pediatrics. You get awarded the MSN when you complete clinicals & courses. The DNP is awarded 4 semesters later when you finish your DNP project. I believe you have to have a certain number of years of peds experience as an RN before being accepted to the program.

Here's a link for BSN-to-DNP pathway: https://www.southalabama.edu/colleges/con/DNP/bsn_dnp.html

Neonatal NP: requires minimum 2 years experience at a level III or higher NICU https://www.southalabama.edu/colleges/con/DNP/neonataldnp.html

Pediatric Acute Care: requires 2 years peds experience in acute care setting https://www.southalabama.edu/colleges/con/DNP/pedacutednp.html

Pediatric Primary Care: requires 2 years peds experience in outpatient setting https://www.southalabama.edu/colleges/con/DNP/pedprimdnp.html

Hope this helps ?

Edited by SopranoKris