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Bills and nursing school

Pre-Nursing   (535 Views 9 Comments)
by Goldfish212 Goldfish212 (New Member) New Member

54 Visitors; 1 Post

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Did you take out student loans to help with bills?

  1. 1. Did you take out student loans to help with bills?

    • Yes I did!
    • I took out a few but I also worked
    • I did not take out loans to help with living costs

9 members have participated

Hello everyone!

I'm looking at going back to school to pursue Nursing, I'm not exactly the traditional student - I'm 32 with a full time job, I live alone and have no children.

I'm just wondering how everyone is able to go to school and work? I don't have the option if living with my parents to save and I don't really want to go that route. I have made arrangements to move this fall to lower my bills and cut my apartment costs in half.

But I've taken a look at when clinicals come into play and the schedule leaves little room for work.

Do people just take out loans to live off of? That seems to frightening. I'm looking for ideas and suggestions. What has been your experience as a working student nurse?

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN.

941 Likes; 11 Followers; 64 Articles; 168,842 Visitors; 13,727 Posts

I worked full time and went to school full time, although I had three different jobs and all of them had flexible hours. I worked as a server in a restaurant, as a bartender and as a hotel maid. I scheduled my work hours so as to not conflict with school, and a couple of times I had to quit jobs and get new ones. Later, when I got my graduate degree, I worked as a nurse every Friday, Saturday and Sunday (12 hours) and went to school during the week.

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FutureNurseInfo has 1 years experience.

2 Likes; 11,072 Visitors; 1,093 Posts

I have been saving for some time now. It may help me at least my first year in school. Once I pass my first two semesters, I plan on becoming a CNA or get a job at a hospital to cover my bills. However, I may also take out loans. Btw, moving in with parents is not such a bad idea! I wish I had such an option.

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13,997 Visitors; 912 Posts

Hoping by Summer or Fall to be accepted into a private College ADN program that's close to $30K. I chose it due to being really the only flexible program in our State. I am hoping when it comes time to start the program cab work full time with fkecibke hours.

The program only meets 16 hrs and 2wicw a week from what I know.

So with $4200 a year in reimbursement hoping to get a grand in scholarships paying $2K out of pocket...plan to take out $15K to $20K in loans.

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232 Likes; 3 Followers; 95,229 Visitors; 36,400 Posts

Night shift full time.

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437 Visitors; 28 Posts

I will be starting nursing in the Fall. I work full time overnight and have 2 kids. I'll technically be considered part-time (credit wise) when I start school because I did all my other non nursing classes before applying to the program so just clinicals and nursing classes are left . I'm a single parent so I don't have the option of not working. I only took out a small student loan just to cover the nursing school fees

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5 Visitors; 1 Post

I'm in a similar situation- 30, no kids, single, going back to school full time. I've just decided to bite the bullet and take out private student loans to help out. I have some federal aid, and I will work very part-time through school (only 15, it's the max of what my program says. Plus, passing school is the priority!). I'll still need the private loans, because of the cost of supplies and living. I wish I could live with my parent's, because I could avoid private loans that way. But it's not an option. I am looking at scholarships as well and the Nurses Health crops program. Either way, if you want to get into nursing - prioritize school, you'll have a good career afterwards, and plenty of working years left. Best of luck!

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BioMaj has 1 years experience.

109 Visitors; 4 Posts

Hi Goldfish212,

I'm also a nontraditional student, I'm 26 and have a Bachelors in Biology.

I avoided loans for 1 semester while maintaining a 4.0. Having a higher GPA was really important to me this time around. I've spoken to several RNs/BSNs, and all have been supportive when I said I'm going straight for my masters/doctorate this time. It was a damn nightmare though, working followed by studying 4-6 hours EVERY DAY at a minimum and having absolutely NO time for walks/biking/cooking/relaxing/recreation/etc. I was getting pretty rough towards the end of that semester. You always need a little time for 'you'. Even if its just one day a week.

Sadly, you can't go into really good paying graduate programs without much experience with average or below average grades.

I looked at what I wanted a little over a year ago (my DNP) and looked at the requirements, then enrolled. Requirements: High GPA, must be a Registered Nurse in the state of the program, and no experience necessary, experience is a plus. So I'm working towards my goal, I broke down and took out loans.

What do you want to do after your associates?

I worked about 3-5 hours a week as a tutor during the semester. (Not a tough job) Just enough to cover groceries and a little gasoline. I rode my bicycle to the tech school. I buy from ALDI. We cooked everything at home. I quit buying things I didn't need-- you'll figure those out ;) . I'm working during the summers. I got decent health insurance from the ACA.

FYI-- My girlfriend is in a doctorate program and is getting better health insurance through the state's (WI) medicare program. A good option if you want to learn and get a career while also having a backup if you need emergency medical care. This depends on your previous years' income, so factor that in (medicare and ACA).

I don't think loans are the best idea, but that's obvious--loans are loans. They're for people who need money but don't have money. Can you maintain good grades and work enough to avoid loans? Becoming an RN isn't a typical associates program. You need to be able to pass the NCLEX even after you finish your program. You have to be able to keep people alive.

Decide what you want, then do what you can do. I'm taking out loans but working a few hours a week. I plan on having loan money left over after I graduate. You have six months after graduation to make no interest payments with the fed loans. If you do take out loans just use it like its borrowed money.

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