Big Decision-Please Help!

Posted
by RNKitKat78 RNKitKat78 (New) New

I am a Public Health nurse working in a STD clinic. I have worked in Public Health for 3 years now, but before starting this job 1 year ago, I worked in many different areas in Public Health instead of just STD nursing. I enjoy working in public health, but I'm getting burned out in this clinic. I recently had a job interview at a local LTC facility and was offered a job as a RN Unit Manager, but I've never had any LTC experience other than internships in nursing school. I graduated almost 5 years ago. The facility close to home, a little more money, and basically the same hours, with the exception of being on call a few times a month. I did accept this position, but now am having second thoughts. It scares me to think of starting in management with no experience outside of nursing school. But, then I think they know my experience, so would they have hired me having doubts about me. I put in my resignation for one month. I'm so confused, and any advice would be GREATLY appreciated!!

BigBee48

BigBee48

Specializes in ICU,IV Team, Endoscopy, CM, LTC, Homecar. Has 18 years experience. 52 Posts

I can tell you frorm experience, it can be overwhelming to be a unit manager. I was one after about 6 yrs in Nursing. I had no idea that people could kiss butt so much, and call you at all hours for the stupidest things. Like an IV came out @ 3:00a.m., what should I do. I do not want to talk you out of it, because I felt I made a big difference, but I was amazed at the stupid people. And the work, never seen so much paperwork, and responsibility. Even when I was not on call, I got calls. I truely love elderly people, and was able to get to know their family. There is alot of work. Good Luck!!

mandykal, ADN, RN

Has 16 years experience. 343 Posts

talk about a leap, i hope the company is not hiring you b/c of title, and sometimes new rn with no experience can be much more inexpensive then if they were to hire an experienced rn. "management" is a huge role. remember you are a leader. you mention that you turned in your resignation in your current job, so that means you've settle and are taking up this new role with no experience. it's alot to handle with no experience. i would not recommend anyone to take up that role with no experience. you're here for advice, i will give you some.

when you start, you need a whole lot of energy, b/c psychologically, you're going to need it. there is a lot of responsibilities, be calm, don't start barking at the beginning. remember, there are a heck-of-alot of people who have been there and knows what works and what don't. listen to them, learn from them. don't complain down to your staff, your role is to voice your opinion upward. it is very important to know your facilities polices. it will take alot of time, and i'm talking about a few months. it is vital to know the polices, state regs, and know what your doc's want and like. usually, ltc has one or two medical docs who will also be the resident/patients' primary care, get to know them b/c you will be making alot of recommendations.

if you are not good in care planning, you better sharpen those skills. b/c as a unit manager, you'll review all the paperwork's, and finalize it to its completion. resident's care conference, you will be attending for all your residents. yes, family members, and other department representatives will also attend. don't panic, you will attend morning report sitting at the table with all the head honchos. i'm sure the company won't feed you to the wolfs, use the orientation to the fullest to learn, question, implement, and evaluate. notice the nursing process hasn't change. most ltc center function the same, just different policies. i know b/c i was once an agency nurse, i worked many nursing homes, and had plenty of full time jobs with different companies. this can be rewarding, if you make it be. this role can be fun, if you let it. you will have trials i'm sure, but that goes with every job. the odds are, you are not the only manager, so don't be afraid to ask.

and if after months or years have gone by and you are not satisfied, there is so many ltc out there don't be afraid to check them out. by then you will have under your belt to succeed as an experienced manager.

i hope that was alittle info.,

good luck,

kal

BigBee48

BigBee48

Specializes in ICU,IV Team, Endoscopy, CM, LTC, Homecar. Has 18 years experience. 52 Posts

I would like to add,as far as the company throwing you to the wolves, they did me. When I showed up for my first day, I expected someone to be there to train me, even if it would have been 1 day. Never had any training. That goes for my job as DON (Director of Nursing) no one there on my first day. WOW!! I was freaked, tried not to show it. And I agree with mandykal, don't complain to your staff. And very smart to listen to the long term employees, they will know alot. Some LTC building, companies will allow you to use pre-printed care plans. I didn't want to scare you away, just know what you are getting into. Also you will be front line when State Board arrives, they probably will throw you front line for them. You might research the company and their past history with State Board of Health, what defecencies they have had, what their turn over rate (employees) are, as well as DON and Administrator. well Good Luck it can be an awesome experience, and job to have under your belt.

RNKitKat78

RNKitKat78

2 Posts

Thank you both so much for the advice! I accepted the position knowing it would be challenging and I realize it will definitely take a lot of time to adjust and learn. I was an interim county nurse manager previously, but left that position due to moving across the state(my husband's job transferred). I liked that position and did learn a lot from it as well. I have also seen what previous managers have done that I could learn from. You both gave a lot of wonderful and helpful advice. I appreciate it greatly and will keep you posted on how things go. I start in 3 weeks. I'm excited but also very nervous!! Thanks again!