Jump to content

Bad orientation should I leave

Nurses   (1,491 Views | 17 Replies)

307 Profile Views; 22 Posts

I have been on orientation since October. My preceptors have not been great. I was held back because one of them has been saying I'm not ready to move on to more sick babies. I was being yelled at a lot. I wrote a letter to my educator about the situation. The second preceptor who had teaching me appropriately is now different.  After writing that letter,  she is more short and picking on every little thing. I was given 2 weeks to show improvement or I have to quit. They wont help with a transfer or anything. I am constantly stressed and feedback has been so poor no matter what I do.  Should I quit? Please help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,541 Posts; 14,282 Profile Views

A question to you for self-reflection- Were you really being "yelled at a lot" or were you being corrected in a no-nonsense fashion?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 Posts; 307 Profile Views

I was being yelled at. I even spoke with my educator and she had agreed. I have been trying my best but to take advice and improve  bit based on comments it doesn't seem to be working. I feel like I have hit a breaking point. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 Followers; 3,955 Posts; 29,982 Profile Views

1 hour ago, Didizain said:

Should I quit? Please help.

Usually by the time people are told "improve in the next few shifts or else...." it would be very difficult for them to change everyone's opinion even if there were no ongoing problems with their care or they could suddenly do everything perfectly.

Minds have already been made up. It might be best to spend some time mulling over this experience and learn what you can from it and look for a place where you can be successful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,718 Posts; 17,830 Profile Views

Anyone who is ever actually yelled at in a learning environment in healthcare should immediately report this behavior.  It is abusive, toxic, and unnacceptable.

 

While you may have been yelled at, that term is often used by people who have been reprimanded or corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

amoLucia specializes in LTC.

5,322 Posts; 46,389 Profile Views

PP JKL33's post pretty much says it all.

You're unhappy and they're unhappy.

Best to let go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,271 Posts; 59,611 Profile Views

9 hours ago, amoLucia said:

PP JKL33's post pretty much says it all.

You're unhappy and they're unhappy.

Best to let go.

100% agree.   If you are unhappy and they are unhappy with your performance ... why stay?   Transfer before they fire you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AlwaysLearning247 has 4 years experience as a BSN.

1 Follower; 380 Posts; 6,539 Profile Views

If you want to try and stick it out, you need to take their criticism and ask what you can improve on. If you don’t feel like you’re in an environment you can thrive in, I would get out sooner rather than later. I would also ask HR about switching to another floor if this one isn’t a good fit. I’d personally rather leave before they had a chance to fire me.

Edited by AlwaysLearning247

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

287 Posts; 71,656 Profile Views

OP, start looking for a new position, with a new employer.

You are a known whistleblower to them; the chances of you surviving now is slim.

Do. Not. Let. Them. Terminate. You.

If you get terminated, and a job application were to ask if you have ever been terminated, you will have to answer "yes" and explain; don't put yourself in that position. Just don't. It does not give you brownie points.

Are you worried what people on the unit will say about you? Don't be. Even if you decide to disclose this position on your next job application and the HR were to call your ex-employer, don't be. If your (likely) soon-to-be ex-employer is smart, they would disclose when you worked for them, and that's it; anymore would put them at risk of being sued for defamation.

(Though, if it has been less than a year since you graduated, you honestly should not bother mentioning this orientation, and consider yourself a born-again new grad - there is a debate on this; personally, I am in the "don't bother mentioning it and keep your mouth shut about it" camp but to each their own on this matter... not going to debate it on this thread.) 

Again: Do. Not. Let. Them. Terminate. You.

Edited by DTWriter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 2,298 Posts; 48,489 Profile Views

1 hour ago, DTWriter said:

[...]

(Though, if it has been less than a year since you graduated, you honestly should not bother mentioning this orientation, and consider yourself a born-again new grad - there is a debate on this; personally, I am in the "don't bother mentioning it and keep your mouth shut about it" camp but to each their own on this matter... not going to debate it on this thread.) 

[...]

OP, If you are asked to list all previous employment, it is in your best interest to do so.  While you might leave this position off and get away with it you should remember that nursing is a small world.  If you do leave it off, and are caught, at best you just placed a huge target on yourself and at worst this could result in immediate termination.

Best wishes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just me. specializes in None.

79 Posts; 478 Profile Views

I couldn't find where it said how long you have been a nurse for.  Some newer nurses that worked in my department were techs in the dept before applying for a nurse position.  Some made it and some did not, but that doesn't mean they will never make it back to our dept, they just need some more experience first.   There is not anything wrong with that. It sounds like you are in a nursery or niccu like position.  A very highly stressful position.  If you don't have experience in this area, maybe start on a med-surgical unit or like to get some experience working with peds.  Med-surg was by far the hardest job I ever had, telemetry the second, but I'm glad I had the experiences.  You can keep studying about your desired field and go back to it with more confidence.  It doesn't make you a failure for this not to work out.  It will feel devastating at first, and what would be really brave is to sit down with your preceptors in a calm and dignified manner with the unit manager and get their feedback, even if it isn't what you want to hear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Followers; 4,612 Posts; 36,002 Profile Views

On 1/6/2020 at 10:38 AM, llg said:

100% agree.   If you are unhappy and they are unhappy with your performance ... why stay?   Transfer before they fire you.

She said they won't help with a transfer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.