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ASU vs. MCC Really?

Arizona   (3,471 Views 19 Comments)
by Bormio Bormio (Member) Member

2,391 Profile Views; 71 Posts

Hi everyone,

What is the real difference between a nursing degree from ASU and MCC in terms of getting a job, quality of education and perception of other nurses? I am only applying to ASU, for the primary reason that I think I can finish faster or at least as quickly and graduate with a BSN. I already have a Masters in Health Admin. so I really don't want to go on for more schooling, so either way AD or BSN, I am done. I just want to be an RN. However, is having a BSN going to help me get a job in critical care? Will I get more respect with a BSN or be perceived as being better prepared? I am wondering if it is a mistake just to apply to the one program.

Thanks for indulging all of my questions!

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Knorremeisje specializes in OR, Telemetry, PCCU, Med/Surg.

161 Posts; 3,047 Profile Views

In the end most employers care only about whether or not you have your licence. When it comes to getting a job in critical care, I think your best chance is to work as an extern in critical care - no matter what program you're in.

Your BSN will actually give you an advantage when you start to climb the corporate ladder. Many BSN programs focus on leadership in contrast to AAS programs. Usually charge nurses, clinical managers, etc. all have BSN's.

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Michigan Man 09 specializes in NA and NT on 28 possible units.

17 Posts; 1,106 Profile Views

If you can do it in the same amount of time, go for it! BSN usually takes 4 years traditionally, ADN 2 years time.

I'm not in the field yet so I cannot comment. I always am a proponent for more education and experience :)

Michigan Man 09

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150 Posts; 2,206 Profile Views

I agree; leadership is the difference.

The BSN will be chosen over an ASN when it comes to a position which requires leadership capabilities.

I went with U of AZ's 2nd degree program due to this... 14 months to a BSN.

Good luck in whichever you choose!

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897 Posts; 12,025 Profile Views

I recall the BSN is emphasized for community nursing as ADN programs typically don't study that. As was mentioned, in the critical care trenches it makes little difference.

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cardiacRN2006 is a ADN, RN and specializes in Cardiac.

4,105 Posts; 16,769 Profile Views

All of my charge nurses and even some managers are ADNs.

And no, it makes no difference in critical care environments.

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515 Posts; 4,981 Profile Views

Do whatever takes the least amount of time, if you can look into the programs (Grand Canyon, and I'm not sure where else, has one) that allow you to use your BS degree and fast forward through NS it shouldn't take very long, something like 14-18 months. I chose the ADN route because at the time it was faster 3.5 years (w/o taking summers off) compared to 4.5-5 years and cheaper. I already have a BS degree and felt that it wouldn't make a difference if I had an ADN or BSN (it hasn't). I also figured it would take me about a year or so to get my BSN after my RN, and the hospital I work at will pay for it!! Now that I've graduated I've actually started looking into just going on to get my MSN and I can just go the RN-MSN route (and have the hospital that I work at pay for it :lol2:).

As for the respect issue, it's all determined by the job you do, not the degree you have. People really don't pay that much attention to your degree and most of the MCC schools have great reputations. If you want to get into a specialty area, definitely look into externing when you're able to, it'll open many more doors than any degree will.

PS- a lot of the charge nurses where I work have their ADN's as well, not BSN's so it really doesn't make that much difference, unless you want to go into upper management. If you already have your Masters, then you're set.

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558 Posts; 8,865 Profile Views

Do whatever takes the least amount of time, if you can look into the programs (Grand Canyon, and I'm not sure where else, has one) that allow you to use your BS degree and fast forward through NS it shouldn't take very long, something like 14-18 months. I chose the ADN route because at the time it was faster 3.5 years (w/o taking summers off) compared to 4.5-5 years and cheaper. I already have a BS degree and felt that it wouldn't make a difference if I had an ADN or BSN (it hasn't). I also figured it would take me about a year or so to get my BSN after my RN, and the hospital I work at will pay for it!! Now that I've graduated I've actually started looking into just going on to get my MSN and I can just go the RN-MSN route (and have the hospital that I work at pay for it :lol2:).

As for the respect issue, it's all determined by the job you do, not the degree you have. People really don't pay that much attention to your degree and most of the MCC schools have great reputations. If you want to get into a specialty area, definitely look into externing when you're able to, it'll open many more doors than any degree will.

PS- a lot of the charge nurses where I work have their ADN's as well, not BSN's so it really doesn't make that much difference, unless you want to go into upper management. If you already have your Masters, then you're set.

You are absolutely right. Degree means nothing for staff nurses. Same for charges. As for administration, MSN never hurts. My problem - I already have a masters in another field and management experience - but I can't stomach the thought of doing another masters - especially in nursing. Imagine having to hear "Evidence Based Practice" everyday for two years. No way...

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71 Posts; 2,391 Profile Views

Thanks a lot to everyone who responded! I am going to apply to both MCC and ASU. I have no interest in management. I want to take care of patients - that is the reason I want to be an RN at this late stage. I think the extern program is good advice. Any ideas on hospitals with good critical care or trauma extern programs?

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48 Posts; 2,482 Profile Views

One of the nurses I work with told me what she feels the difference between the two programs is. She saids that ASU's program focuses on the theory of nursing and the communiy colleges focus on the hands on portions. She said not only do ASU nurses learn how to do certain skills, they learn WHY they are doing them.

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558 Posts; 8,865 Profile Views

One of the nurses I work with told me what she feels the difference between the two programs is. She saids that ASU's program focuses on the theory of nursing and the communiy colleges focus on the hands on portions. She said not only do ASU nurses learn how to do certain skills, they learn WHY they are doing them.

With all due respect, that is the biggest load of "hoey" I ever heard! Gee - "we do bed baths because they fit within Maslow's hierarchy of needs." Wow - deep theory and an even deeper application of knowledge. Frankly, I note no difference between ADN and BSN degree holders. As someone who already has an advanced degree in another discipline, I find the very fact there is a pseudo-controversy around this subject kind of laughable. I believe Henry Kissinger once stated something to the effect of "there is so much controversey around academics because so little is at stake." One cohort of nurses is no more uniquely suited for being an RN than another. And the extra theories has very very little day-to-day applications, if any. The young BSN grads are no more smarter, mature, or even more theoretically in the no than a young ADN grad. As far as the BSN and management positions - I think an MBA will give you more of the necessary management tools than a couple of extra nursing theory classes...

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