Jump to content

As a CRNA, Can You Still Pick Up RN Shifts?

SRNA   (6,766 Views | 9 Replies)

CSUSM10 is a RN and specializes in ER psych.

5,574 Profile Views; 174 Posts

I'm curious if, as a CRNA, you are still allowed to pick up bedside shifts as an RN? I know, you might say, why would you want to do that, you make more as a CRNA. But to have variety in work and keep up bedside skills (NGs, foleys, person-to-person interaction, etc.) I

think it would be nice if I was able to become a CRNA and then pick up a shift here and there in the ER or ICU.

As a CRNA, are you restricted from performing the role of a bedside RN? Thoughts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

1 Follower; 5,045 Posts; 52,937 Profile Views

I'm curious if, as a CRNA, you are still allowed to pick up bedside shifts as an RN? I know, you might say, why would you want to do that, you make more as a CRNA. But to have variety in work and keep up bedside skills (NGs, foleys, person-to-person interaction, etc.) I

think it would be nice if I was able to become a CRNA and then pick up a shift here and there in the ER or ICU.

As a CRNA, are you restricted from performing the role of a bedside RN? Thoughts?

Yes, you could do that, but you would not be held to the standards of an RN but a CRNA and the money would likely be a lot less. So my question would be if you want to continue working as an RN after becoming a CRNA, then why even become a CRNA?. It sounds like you haven't made up your mind that you want to be a CRNA yet. Have you spent time shadowing CRNAs, especially independent CRNAs? I don't place foleys, but OGs/NGs are common and I interact with patients all the time. I don't spend a lot time with patients, but when I work OB or the preop clinic I spend quite a bit of time with patients.

http://www.aana.com/resources2/professionalpractice/Documents/CRNAs%20functioning%20as%20RNs.pdf

Edited by wtbcrna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Double-Helix has 9 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PICU, Sedation/Radiology, PACU.

1 Article; 3,377 Posts; 42,062 Profile Views

I agree with wtbcrna that it may create conflicts between your license and your job description. Similar to an RN working as a CNA, you are held to the standard of your highest licensure. So if you're in the ER and a patient needs an advanced airway, as a CRNA you might want to throw in an LMA. But your facility may not allow RNs to perform this skill, and you're being employed as an RN. It gets tricky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CSUSM10 is a RN and specializes in ER psych.

174 Posts; 5,574 Profile Views

Another reason I'm wondering is if it took me a while to find a CRNA job, it would be nice to work as an RN to earn income!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wtbcrna is a MSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

1 Follower; 5,045 Posts; 52,937 Profile Views

Another reason I'm wondering is if it took me a while to find a CRNA job, it would be nice to work as an RN to earn income!

You would more than likely have been not working as an RN for 3 years while going through anesthesia school, and you would still be held to a higher standard than an RN.

It sounds like you haven't made up your mind that you want to be CRNA yet. Why don't you spend some more time shadowing different CRNAs in different kinds of practices to see if that is what you really want to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

88 Posts; 2,402 Profile Views

I have no desire to place Foley's anymore, but in clinical I inserted more NGs (not counting OGs) in my first month than I did in 5 years as a CVICU RN. The skills you use as a CRNA are so much different (and more advanced) than the skills you use as a RN. I'll gladly lose my ability to insert a Flexiseal if that means I can insert epidurals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 Posts; 918 Profile Views

Another reason I'm wondering is if it took me a while to find a CRNA job, it would be nice to work as an RN to earn income!

You could pick up shifts as an RN before you are credentialed as a CRNA. However, if you went to CRNA school without picking up any shifts, most hospitals might refuse to hire you since you would have gone greater than 2 years without bedside experience.

I knew a nurse who continued to work in the ICU while in CRNA school and picked up shifts while studying for her boards. She failed on her first try. My advice is study for boards after graduation, pass your boards, and then party your ass off. Go backpacking in Europe, South America, or wherever you've always wanted to travel.

If you don't party then volunteer for your favorite charity. Once credentialed, stick to your lane as a CRNA. You will have plenty of time to interact with patients. Don't forget preop and postop interviews and you can spend time rounding on patients on the floors. Ugh! You can place a foley if you want... just ask the OR circulator. Like others have said... intubations, OG/NG placement, epidurals, spinals, nerve blocks are so much more fun than placing a foley catheter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

39 Posts; 912 Profile Views

I am 100% sold on becoming a CRNA. I am actually hoping to be accepted into school very soon. However, I will say, I have entertained the thought of being a flight nurse on a part time basis once I am a CRNA. Meaning, 2-3 shifts per month at best. My desire comes from a back ground in EMS and firefighting. I enjoy the prehospital aspect, and I would not be too prideful to work as a Flight Nurse even as a CRNA. In that setting, I will still have the opportunity to utilize the airway skills that I attain while in CRNA school, and possibly even other skills such as chest tube insertion or chest needle decompression.

I know an Emergency Medicine physician that flies twice per month, and a Trauma Surgeon that flies every Monday. I feel as though that will be almost equivilant to me flying as a CRNA. It is definitely not a MUST DO thing for me, but it is certainly something that I will consider. I will love being a CRNA. I have nearly 100 shadowing hours, and understand very well what my role will consist of, but it would be nice to still have that prehospital experience every now and then. I would not personally do bedside nursing as a CRNA though, as mentioned in previous posts. Solely flight nursing, and I would likely continue to do some volunteering with my county fire department, but thats just my persepctive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PaSSiNGaS has 10 years experience.

2 Followers; 202 Posts; 4,748 Profile Views

Univ of Maryland Shock Trauma has CRNAs that are apart of a GO TEAM that flies to bad accidents in the Baltimore area. I'm sure there may be other groups that use CRNAs to fly but this is for sure one and you could work in the busiest trauma hospital in the country.

I am 100% sold on becoming a CRNA. I am actually hoping to be accepted into school very soon. However, I will say, I have entertained the thought of being a flight nurse on a part time basis once I am a CRNA. Meaning, 2-3 shifts per month at best. My desire comes from a back ground in EMS and firefighting. I enjoy the prehospital aspect, and I would not be too prideful to work as a Flight Nurse even as a CRNA. In that setting, I will still have the opportunity to utilize the airway skills that I attain while in CRNA school, and possibly even other skills such as chest tube insertion or chest needle decompression.

I know an Emergency Medicine physician that flies twice per month, and a Trauma Surgeon that flies every Monday. I feel as though that will be almost equivilant to me flying as a CRNA. It is definitely not a MUST DO thing for me, but it is certainly something that I will consider. I will love being a CRNA. I have nearly 100 shadowing hours, and understand very well what my role will consist of, but it would be nice to still have that prehospital experience every now and then. I would not personally do bedside nursing as a CRNA though, as mentioned in previous posts. Solely flight nursing, and I would likely continue to do some volunteering with my county fire department, but thats just my persepctive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

39 Posts; 912 Profile Views

Univ of Maryland Shock Trauma has CRNAs that are apart of a GO TEAM that flies to bad accidents in the Baltimore area. I'm sure there may be other groups that use CRNAs to fly but this is for sure one and you could work in the busiest trauma hospital in the country.

Oh wow, that's pretty cool, I had no idea. I've worked Level 1 Trauma in Memphis, and the CRNA's there are a major asset and are used for a great deal of things, but nothing to that extent. Years ago, I was told, that some of the trauma surgeons would be flown to scenes as you have mentioned. That is interesting though, thanks for sharing. I will look more into that, definitely a different aspect of the profession!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.