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Are these teachers the norm, or just lucky?

Educators   (1,301 Views 10 Comments)
by haitianrn haitianrn (New Member) New Member

2,285 Visitors; 59 Posts

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The instructors at my nursing school( a community college in Chicago) told us that their annual salary is round 62,000 annually including summers. They have masters of course in tracks such as Leadership, or Education. To me, that seems like a decent salary considering the work conditions are great compared to a floor nurse. I envy them and especially because I have young kids, would love a job like that. My question is, from reading these threads, many are saying they barely make that much and say teaching doesn't pay the bills. Is this really so bad, and are the instructors at my school jut lucky? i want to pursue a MSN and so far the teaching track is most feasible for me in terms of cost, convenience , and time compared to say the CNS track, which is my preference. I was wondering if I got the MSN in teaching now could I go back later and get a post masters certificate as a CNS? I just cant do the CNS now and think Id rather teach in the meantime than be a floor nurse forever, but not if the pay sucks.

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2,285 Visitors; 59 Posts

BUMP----Anybody have any input, opinions?

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 135 Articles; 186,933 Visitors; 20,741 Posts

I live in central IL and $62k doesn't go far in Chicago.

That's pretty poor wages for an MSN-prepared RN.

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June59 specializes in Med/surg.

1,929 Visitors; 25 Posts

Considering the years of schooling, $62,000 is not very good. I think you also need to look at the work that your instructors takes home, such as grading papers, preparing lectures & assignments. Also off campus faculty meetings with the nursing department as well as campus wide. It is definitely more than a 40 hour work week. Whereas, in the hospital, work begins when you punch in & ends when you punch out. Days off are just that.

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lkwashington has 4 years experience and specializes in Tele, ICU, ED, Nurse Instructor,.

5,229 Visitors; 557 Posts

I live in central IL and $62k doesn't go far in Chicago.

That's pretty poor wages for an MSN-prepared RN.

I disagree. It depends where you live and how you live.

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lkwashington has 4 years experience and specializes in Tele, ICU, ED, Nurse Instructor,.

5,229 Visitors; 557 Posts

Considering the years of schooling, $62,000 is not very good. I think you also need to look at the work that your instructors takes home, such as grading papers, preparing lectures & assignments. Also off campus faculty meetings with the nursing department as well as campus wide. It is definitely more than a 40 hour work week. Whereas, in the hospital, work begins when you punch in & ends when you punch out. Days off are just that.[/quote

It depends where the instructor works. It may vary.

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dorimar has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Education.

7,469 Visitors; 635 Posts

I spend every night and every weekend at home working on my classes. The amoutn of time I spend actually in class is much less than preparation and grading. However, I have been told this time is not required.... So I guess it's my problem the hours i spend.

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dorimar has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, Education.

7,469 Visitors; 635 Posts

Also you have to consider years of experience..... I worked the bedside for 25 years in critical care and it is a cut in pay for me to leave the bedside and go to the classroom....

Just looking at contact hours alone I am making less than I can at the bedside. But when you add all the preparation and work at home it is almost like minimum wage...

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JBudd has 38 years experience as a MSN and specializes in trauma, teaching.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 35,185 Visitors; 3,709 Posts

I do both, and as said above I don't have to take home any work from the ED. Teaching I have 27 assignments from each class to grade weekly, plus the papers and submissions.

My college (MSN) pay is literally 2/3 the hourly rate I get at the hospital (BSN job); adjunct faculty gets paid by the credit hour per class, not actual time spent.

As far as the CNS goes, we have a wound care specialist, but not really many positions for CNS nurses. Don't know what the job market is out there for them.

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jlcole45 specializes in ER, ICU, Education.

8,030 Visitors; 474 Posts

It really depends on what you love to do as a nurse. Yes the pay is lower but there are often other benefits such as state insurance and teachers retirement. And as you already mentioned better hours (unless you work in a program that does evening or weekend clinicals). That said, when you work a 9 or 10 month program you can work during the time off to earn extra money and keep up your own clinical skills.

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