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APRN Dual Certifications Benefits?

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by N10SVFNP N10SVFNP (New Member) New Member Nurse

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Cococure has 7 years experience.

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On 5/13/2019 at 8:51 PM, fsuao2006 said:

Does anyone think the dual role in the case of FNP/ACPNP is worth it?  trying to decide between an FNP or dual program.  Currently work in procedures, have experience in ER, have considered urgent care/procedure type of NP but would probably be happy in a clinic area as well.  

Yes I think if you want more options. I originally wanted to pursue this type of degree because I wanted to have the choice to be a hospitalist or outpatient because most hospitals want the ACNP for inpatient roles. But I am finished with my FNP and I am good. 

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djmatte has 7 years experience as a ADN, MSN, RN, NP.

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18 hours ago, allennp said:

I think it might be for some. I have a hard time seeing where the differentation of the ARNP role is going to end. If I was 30 yrs younger going in to this I would struggle to decide, I am currently inpatient working at a level one center as a FNP. Sort of grandfathered in, now we hire mostly ACNP's for inpatient. Thing is I take care of kids as well. Both clinic, inpatient and ED/ICU. What cert would be best? I guess ACNP, FNP.  Ironically I lecture and precept ACNP and FNP students, and have previously served as expert content source for the initial ACNP workup and planning(though in reality contributed little). My current position needs the pediatric component that the ACNP would not cover. The current consensus model has few advocates, but its water under the bridge and one must live with it. 

I do think the biggest disservice we give both ourselves and the medical community is by fracturing NPs and in specialization.  They do need to broaden NP education to be more encompassing.  It would be smarter to promote specialization through fellowships more than how things are set up now.  They wouldn't need a "consensus model" if the profession as a whole was more broadly trained.

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PMHNP Man has 7 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Psychiatry.

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I suppose if you're in an independent practice state you can do whatever you want.

You'll find a lot of psych inpatient units that sometimes require the rounding psych provider to do H&Ps and tend to all the medical voodoo. Idk how/if you can code a H&P and psych eval on same day/same provider.

Addictions units might find that duality beneficial. Drug addicts like jail inmates suddenly develop all kinds of problems and complaints while in treatment.

Aside from that, in psych outpatient practice, nobody has time (or desire) to treat the medical "stuff." 

Me: "You'll have to take that up with your primary care.'

Patient: "I don't have primary care right now."

Me: "Might ought to find one. See ya in ____ months."

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 149 Articles; 187,536 Visitors; 20,805 Posts

On 5/15/2019 at 10:44 AM, djmatte said:

I do think the biggest disservice we give both ourselves and the medical community is by fracturing NPs and in specialization.  They do need to broaden NP education to be more encompassing.  It would be smarter to promote specialization through fellowships more than how things are set up now.  They wouldn't need a "consensus model" if the profession as a whole was more broadly trained.

THIS like a thousand times....

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