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Any new grads get an "acute care" job with no paid clinical/ work experience?

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344 Posts; 5,141 Profile Views

I was a career changer. No hospital experience (exclusive of my clinicals). Never even volunteered at a hospital. As a GN, you apply everywhere and anywhere. I wanted to stay away from LTC and Med/surg but when you are in need of a job that idea gets thrown completely out the door. I did end up in a GN residency program and work in critical care.

Network, network, network! Good luck to you.

Thank you!

I am so impatient about finding a job. I need to focus on school and the NCLEX first then go after the job part.

however I am networking every day I can!

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marcos9999 has 5 years experience as a MSN, RN.

3 Articles; 625 Posts; 15,103 Profile Views

The reality is that there are no formulas. Some students get jobs right away and others don't. The nursing environment right now is not conducive to preparing new nurses, they actually starting to need nurses but no one wants to train you, evidenced by the disappearance of new grad programs. Right now I think one of the best strategy is to get a job on a SNF because these places are hiring new grads w/ no experience, once you have one year go to an traveling agency and look for one that is not expecting "acute care experience" they do exist because the market for these agencies is very hot right now. Learn everything you can learn at the SNF as if you were in a hospital so your chances are better once you get placed and good luck to you new nurse.

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Meriwhen is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

2 Followers; 4 Articles; 7,907 Posts; 60,227 Profile Views

It was a while ago, right when the new grad market started sucking, but I did land in acute psych w/o any paid experience. I did have volunteer experience at the local city clinic.

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7 Articles; 1,144 Posts; 38,015 Profile Views

I was a career changer. No hospital experience (exclusive of my clinicals). Never even volunteered at a hospital. As a GN, you apply everywhere and anywhere. I wanted to stay away from LTC and Med/surg but when you are in need of a job that idea gets thrown completely out the door. I did end up in a GN residency program and work in critical care.

Network, network, network! Good luck to you.

Me too, pretty much same as above.

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344 Posts; 5,141 Profile Views

The reality is that there are no formulas. Some students get jobs right away and others don't. The nursing environment right now is not conducive to preparing new nurses, they actually starting to need nurses but no one wants to train you, evidenced by the disappearance of new grad programs. Right now I think one of the best strategy is to get a job on a SNF because these places are hiring new grads w/ no experience, once you have one year go to an traveling agency and look for one that is not expecting "acute care experience" they do exist because the market for these agencies is very hot right now. Learn everything you can learn at the SNF as if you were in a hospital so your chances are better once you get placed and good luck to you new nurse.

I have a question about SNFs, and please do not judge me for asking it:

Is the pay in SNF's significantly lower than outside the SNF? And is there equal room for growth? As in, can you reasonably expect that if you work hard for a few years you are qualified to move up to management? Additionally, I want to go to graduate school. If I choose to become an NP or get a PhD, will SNF experience put me at a major disadvantage?

I actually would enjoy working outside the hospital (I like everything! Especially Public Health! and I am open to nursing homes), but from what I have heard online and from some friends, you don't get paid as much. As in, significantly less. I don't demand celebrity pay, but if I want to make roughly the same as in a hospital, especially since HH or PH places may not reimburse you for gas.

I agree that there are no formulas. I know a lot of people who worked as aides and still cannot find a job 8 months post-graduation. In the past, being an aide almost guaranteed a good job. Likewise, I know people applying all over America who still have not heard back from anyone yet.

Thank you :)

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

8,427 Posts; 75,956 Profile Views

I have a question about SNFs, and please do not judge me for asking it: Is the pay in SNF's significantly lower than outside the SNF? And is there equal room for growth? As in, can you reasonably expect that if you work hard for a few years you are qualified to move up to management?

Additionally, I want to go to graduate school. If I choose to become an NP or get a PhD, will SNF experience put me at a major disadvantage? I actually would enjoy working outside the hospital (I like everything! Especially Public Health! and I am open to nursing homes), but from what I have heard online and from some friends, you don't get paid as much. As in, significantly less. I don't demand celebrity pay, but if I want to make roughly the same as in a hospital, especially since HH or PH places may not reimburse you for gas.

I agree that there are no formulas. I know a lot of people who worked as aides and still cannot find a job 8 months post-graduation. In the past, being an aide almost guaranteed a good job. Likewise, I know people applying all over America who still have not heard back from anyone yet. Thank you :)

In my experience, the pay was the same in SNF than my new grad program.

In SNF/LTC, pts are sicker, and are getting people from the hospital sooner. I had a year experience and took a leadership job. There is room for growth (my DON was a CNA to RN to supervisors to ADON to DON) and is a specialty as much as Med-Surg, Critical Care, and Maternity is a specialty.

There are NPs that are employed at my facility and are wonderful to work with; being in a SNF is a boon for learning to hone your assessments; and there is a place for your experience as a SNF nurse to transition to an NP later in your career.

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344 Posts; 5,141 Profile Views

In my experience, the pay was the same in SNF than my new grad program.

In SNF/LTC, pts are sicker, and are getting people from the hospital sooner. I had a year experience and took a leadership job. There is room for growth (my DON was a CNA to RN to supervisors to ADON to DON) and is a specialty as much as Med-Surg, Critical Care, and Maternity is a specialty.

There are NPs that are employed at my facility and are wonderful to work with; being in a SNF is a boon for learning to hone your assessments; and there is a place for your experience as a SNF nurse to transition to an NP later in your career.

wow your post is encouraging!!!

A lot of people judge LTC work and stigmatize it but I think that as long as there is good pay, the clients are treated with respect, and I have room for growth, I will be happy, no matter where I work.

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446 Posts; 7,294 Profile Views

I was a 2nd degree BSN student and graduated in December. I had no paid hospital experience and will begin in the NICU next week. I was a straight A student through school, however. Going in I knew jobs (especially hospital jobs) were tight so I buckled down and made sure I read everything I possibly could, studied while my family was off having fun, showed up for every class/ clinical, and did everything instructors asked of me with a smile. For me it paid off. Good luck.

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