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Any facilities actually using an AccuVein? Any thoughts?

Nurses   (1,742 Views | 23 Replies)

EDboundSN is a EMT-B and specializes in Emergency Department.

5,170 Profile Views; 230 Posts

Title says it all...I've read about them and seen them online yet never seen one be used in person.  Anyone's facility using them or have any experience with them?  Are they as amazing as they look?

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mi_dreamin has <1 years experience.

51 Posts; 1,322 Profile Views

I think so, we call it a veinfinder. IME, those who are "good sticks" don't care for it. Others love it. I'm somewhere in the middle. The reality is that I still have to be able to feel the vein (most of the time) in order to hit it so it is a nice tool but I don't grab it every (or even most) times I place an IV.

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littlerayofsunshine has 6 years experience as a BSN and specializes in MS, OB.

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We do. I have had mixed results using it. I find it a little fiddly to use even with the stand. However, if you really can't see anything, it does give you somewhere to look. 

I really thought I'd like it better but I hardly use it anymore. 

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LibraNurse27 has 5 years experience.

169 Posts; 3,020 Profile Views

I really like it but it definitely doesn’t guarantee 100% success. It has definitely improved my success though. As stated above you still have to palpate the veins and it doesn’t show deep veins like an ultrasound machines. It has definitely helped me find veins I didn’t see or feel without it though and it shows where they go and in some cases if they are blown/damaged above the intended insertion site. I like it!

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12 Followers; 3,912 Posts; 29,777 Profile Views

2 hours ago, WAboundSN said:

Are they as amazing as they look?

No. They are mostly good for fooling people into poking at spider veins and other superficial vasculature. And in really difficult situations they aren't the thing that gets the job done.

Edited by JKL33

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akulahawkRN has 5 years experience as a ADN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Emergency Department.

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I have used those vein finders before. What I've found is that they're helpful at certain times in locating veins but most of the time I really don't need to use it. The vast majority of the time I use it as basically a scanning device to clue me into where a vein might be. Once I know that, most of the time I've been able to get the line without much difficulty. I've only actually needed it to guide me in starting a line a couple times. 

Good piece of equipment when used correctly, when it's not, it's an expensive toy.

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Spadeforce has 1 years experience.

191 Posts; 1,867 Profile Views

I love the facebook posts on some of the ads for these things. All these nurses going "real nurses use touch only these things are training wheels." Like they are some type of mygever or whatever. 

These tools aren't perfect but there is a reason interventional radiologists use U/s CT to guide things. 

 

Never understood how hardcore nurses are on being "expert" at unguided IV sticks and think anyone who uses any type of assist is a lesser being. They wouldn't last one minute in IR where you can actually "hurt" a patient.

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pluckyduck has 7 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER, OR.

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We have one. I personally don’t like it because ours is on a wheeed stand and it’s big and bulky to cram into an exam room. I also don’t find it works for me. But some people love it. My preceptor when I first started taught me use to a hot pack for the tricky ones and I’ve alwys remembered that years later. It can work like a charm in a pinch, 😂. 

I learned how to do ultrasound sounded PIVs and insert external jugular PIVs (which are great in an emergency). I also tell people to check the medial wrist, posterior forearm (although those veins tend to roll if not properly stabilized) and if policy allows it in your facility (I’m in the ER) I’ve put them in the anterior shoulder medial to the axilla. 

I work with a couple nurses who can palpate the brachial artery and slide in the IV right next to it to hit the brachial vein in the antecubital site. I am not that much of a ninja, haha. 

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU.

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Being in pediatrics my whole career, every hospital I have worked for has had one since they came out. Admittingly, I do not use them that often and have mixed feelings about them. The rare times I have used them has been to try to get a better view of the path the vein is taking before I place the line, usually with kids who have limited access options.

I don't think they are bad, but they give you a very basic picture of a vein without much context such as the depth of the vein. Not to sound like a COB here but I think it can be a crutch if you start out learning how to place IVs with them as a new grad. 

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7 Followers; 3,395 Posts; 23,970 Profile Views

They are twice as expensive as the Bard Pre-Vue Ultrasound and nowhere near as useful. They do make a good coat rack though. 

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That Guy has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN, EMT-B and specializes in Emergency/Cath Lab.

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They suck. Give me an Ultrasound over that useless thing any day of the week

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PeakRN specializes in Adult and pediatric emergency and critical care.

533 Posts; 5,657 Profile Views

There are several studies that show it to not increase success. Since it has been proven to not increase success over traditional placement I'm not sure why anyone buys them or why they even exist.

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01042613

There are a couple of other studies you can search out if you really desire, I have yet to find one where they was a real benefit in outcome.

Our facility does have a couple, but I have never used one nor does the  vascular access team. I do often find it in the corner of a room after some poor patient has been poked multiple times before I eventually get called to poke the patient.

I will use things that will help me, be it a wee light or an ultrasound machine, so I'm not some rigid old school person who just hates technology.

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