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ANCC to retire most popular, and eventually all, NP roles.

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by RPF,PhD,NP RPF,PhD,NP (New Member) New Member

RPF,PhD,NP has 14 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, ER, HIV/AIDS, NP.

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This topic has really caught my attention. I am unable to understand why the powers that be are not offering a mechanism to convert an old credential to a newer one. This seems like a way of dividing the profession.

I see that the FNP credential will be up for review in the next several years. Many nurses will be starting FNP programs in 2012. Based on the information we now know, do you think there is any reason to hold off on attending a FNP program until we see what changes are made?

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kyboyrn has 5 years experience and specializes in Nurse Practitioner-Emergency Room.

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Reading this makes me glad I went with the FNP certification, and that I am certified with the AANP. I work in emergency medicine, and although I was advised by some that the Adult NP route was the way to go if I wanted to do ER, I was lucky enough to have a friend who told me otherwise. He was certified in Adult care, and he attempted to get a job at a few different emergency rooms, and no one would hire him because he couldn't treat children. So, he went back and got his family certification so that he could get a job (at the same ER I work at). Also, in regards to what the author who started this discussion was talking about as far as geriatric care, I feel that our FNP program adequately covered geriatric care. Actually, one semester was focused quite extensively on the aging population, which is great because in the ER, the elderly (as well as children) make up a large poriton of our patient population. I see the goal of what the ANCC is doing, but I disagree with how they are doing it, and that they are actually doing it. I am sorry to all of the APNs that are in these specialties that they are phasing out. I do disagree with the initial posters idea that the family practice certification may be phased out in the future. I think that the biggest push for nurse practitioners is in the family practice area, to fill the void of a decreasing amount of family practice physicians, and to provide primary care to patients across the lifespan in rural areas. I think if there were to be only one remaining certification (which I hope never, ever happens obviously...we need all of our APN specialties as far as I'm concerned) I think the family practice certification would remain. The AANP has less certification choices, so all of this streamlining won't affect APNs certified with them I suppose. I personally chose them because of a variety of reasons, but I'm kinda glad I did now. Continue to advocate for the varying certifications, and maybe with enough support, there will be some changes to what the ANCC actually does in the long run. Sorry if I got a little long winded guys. Worked a long busy 12 in the ED, and I'm not able to sleep, and I gotta be back at it in the morning!! Loving my job as a ER NP thought!!!

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CCRNDiva has 7 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Level II Trauma Center ICU.

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I wonder what this says about our current education standards and quality of practice of NPs to our colleagues (physicians, etc) when they are continuing to label current NP education as inferior. I worry that this is sending the wrong message when there is a multitude of research that supports the efficacy of NPs in current practice. Physicians are not required to hold certification in "adult-gerontology" in order to be certified as an internist. Isn't it implied that internal medicine would include training that covers the adult lifespan.

Could this possibly be a back door way to get around making current NPs return to school to obtain the DNP? It seems odd that this consensus model is supposed to start in 2015, the same year they recommended the DNP become the recommended degree for entry to practice. How do we know that this won't force schools to eliminate post-masters options in favor of the DNP?

The criteria they provide for certification elgibility is quite vague, so how is student supposed to be sure they are eligible for certification? How can an education in adult advanced practice nursing not include geriatric nursing content? It does not make sense.

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juan de la cruz has 27 years experience as a MSN, RN, NP and specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care.

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i wonder what this says about our current education standards and quality of practice of nps to our colleagues (physicians, etc) when they are continuing to label current np education as inferior. i worry that this is sending the wrong message when there is a multitude of research that supports the efficacy of nps in current practice. physicians are not required to hold certification in "adult-gerontology" in order to be certified as an internist. isn't it implied that internal medicine would include training that covers the adult lifespan.

could this possibly be a back door way to get around making current nps return to school to obtain the dnp? it seems odd that this consensus model is supposed to start in 2015, the same year they recommended the dnp become the recommended degree for entry to practice. how do we know that this won't force schools to eliminate post-masters options in favor of the dnp?

the criteria they provide for certification elgibility is quite vague, so how is student supposed to be sure they are eligible for certification? how can an education in adult advanced practice nursing not include geriatric nursing content? it does not make sense.

oh, it's embarassing. as if acnp and anp aren't too much letters already, now we have to explain to our non-np colleagues what the heck the letters a-g acnp and a-g pcnp mean! being in critical care, there is already an existing body of literature on acnp's in the critical care field and our intensivist colleagues are beginning to understand what the letters mean and what our distinct training is about. it will only be beneficial to let the title hang around for a while and gain more public recognition. like you said medicine never comes up with such pointless ideas, i mean what kind of an oxymoron is "adult and geriatric intensivist" or "adult and geriatric medicine"? granted geriatric medicine is really a subspecialty within internal medicine of family practice.

i really can't tell if this a ploy to get apn's to go back for a dnp. i just feel that there's no concrete direction on how this change is going to transition smoothly for everyone affected. ancc so irresponsibily dropped this bombshell without giving clear direction on what curricular changes constitute eligibility for graduates to sit for these new combined adult and gerontology certifications. i actually looked around online to see what changes have been made in the curricula in schools that are already selling a new and improved adult and gerontology acnp program and i seriously see an exact copy of the same acnp program i finished back in 2003! so what makes these programs new? i hope it's not just slapping the word "gerontology" in the title and then calling this specialty track new.

just look at these two examples and i am not knocking these schools down, these are just examples to prove my point:

a. http://nursing.ucla.edu/workfiles/academics/acnp-onc-2011.pdf

b. http://www.rushu.rush.edu/servlet/blobserver?blobcol=urlfile&blobtable=document&blobkey=id&blobwhere=1245164500530&blobheader=application%2fpdf&blobnocache=true

school b above is a dnp program but after you remove all the "dnp fluff", it's the same old master's acnp program i took years ago in another institution! not surprisingly, my search did show one acnp program that added actual gerontology content:

http://www.nyu.edu/nursing/academicprograms/masters/programs/acute.pdf

so here we go again, no consistency and more confusion than ever. what are the guidelines ancc? what makes a program eligible to meet the new and improved a-g acnp certification in 2013? is nonpf coming out with the guidelines and shouldn't one be out by now?

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what the heck the letters A-G ACNP and A-G PCNP mean! Being in critical care, there is already an existing body of literature on ACNP's in the critical care field and our intensivist colleagues are beginning to understand what the letters mean and what our distinct training is about. It will only be beneficial to let the title hang around for a while and gain more public recognition. Like you said Medicine never comes up with such pointless ideas, I mean what kind of an oxymoron is "Adult and Geriatric Intensivist" or "Adult and Geriatric Medicine"??
Ditto :eek:

Hahaha, if this trend goes on when they review FNP and PMHNP in few years, the current FNP or PMHNP will be PAGFNP or PAGPMHNP (stressing pediatric/adult/gero FNP or PMHNP) :lol2:

Edited by reeya

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Psychcns has 30 years experience and specializes in Psychiatric Nursing.

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Hello--my frustrations are slightly different but there are similarities. I got my MSN and Psych CNS certification in 1993, before the Psych NP came along. I have prescriptive authority. The psych cns at that time had five roles: education, practice, consulting, management, and research. My program was very clinical. I had enough of the 3 P's ( pharmacology, pathophys,and psychopharm) to prescribe. And to keep current, I take continuing ed in these subjects. Now I would like to prescribe beyond my home state...Every state has there own criteria and some wont let a cns prescribe at all. Instead of retireing certifications, why doesn't ANCC try to help us more and try to help remove barriers to practice...It should be easy for me to go from one state to another and do the same job...They say it is up to the state to regulate nursing practice--but ANCC could do more to work with state boards to make it easier for license by endorsement (with prescriptive authority) from state to state

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I couldn't agree with you more. I have dutifully obtained both an adult NP and adult psychiatric NP certification after completing the two graduate programs. I followed the ANCC's direction to the letter to do this. Then, in the span of one month, I am to find out that both are being retired. The ANCC has certainly let me down. I completely understand that if I meet the requirements I can keep my current certification. But what if I don't??? I can no longer test for recertification.

A few thoughts on this very frustrating matter:

I think its very important to make our opinion known to the ANCC. I don't care that it was due to the "consensus model" that the ANCC is making these changes. These changes are ultimately their responsibility. Its their test. Please take a few moments to write to them to let them know your thoughts on this.

As I see it, geriatrics is a component of adult health. As I understood it, my population specialty was adolescent, adult and geriatrics. By changing this credential, it implies that I am not competent in geriatrics. If the ANCC wanted more geriatric content, why didn't they just expand this area in their adult test?

The ANCC certainly has the power to put a stop to this. If not, I for one will not renew my ANA membership. (The ANCC is a subsidiary of the ANA.) I thought they were supposed to be working for me, not against me. This is no trivial matter. I don't always agree with everything ANA does, but this is situation demonstrates to me they are no longer considering my best interests.

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traumaRUs - Judy has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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The consensus model is being done in conjunction with the NCSBN so that all those states that are members will have the same requirements so that will (hopefully) allow an APN to have the same scope of practice in multiple states.

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That's a great idea. But why not leave it as Adult NP and Adult Psychiatric NP. Adult NP is one of the largest groups of NP's. Now they want to change it to something that doesn't even exist presently. All states recognized the Adult NP. There was no reason to change.

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traumaRUs - Judy has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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Oh believe me, I totally agree with you! I'm an adult health CNS which is another retired certification.

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Its interesting that one of the places I did my clinicals in school - a "top" hospital in Boston will only hire GNPs for their outpatient clinical site- so I ownder if all the NPs there will be "retired". Such nonsense.

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traumaRUs - Judy has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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If my certification is "retired" can I retire too?

Doubt it!

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