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by jfmDNP jfmDNP (New) New Expert Nurse

jfmDNP has 11 years experience and specializes in Family Medicine.

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I've heard from many others referring to the acronyms used by nurses after their name as being an alphabet soup, and I agree. It's superfluous. I understand that not all RNs have a BSN and not all APRNs are NPs or CRNAs. But wouldn't it serve to better succinctly clarify our title by limiting it to a single acronym? 

As with physicians, one can be a pediatrician, rheumatologist or dermatologist and still be John Doe/Jane Doe, MD. It's a given that an NP is an RN/BSN with a minimum masters degree and is also an APRN. And now with the DNP, it's understood than an NP with a DNP is all those other things mentioned with the added educational accomplishment. What's the point with writing Jane Doe, DNP, FNP-BC, AGACNP-C, APRN, MSN, RN (While their colleagues just write Jane Doe, MD or John Doe, PharmD)? Why not just be John Doe/Jane Doe, DNP? I find even adding FNP, PNP, AGACNP, CNM, PMHNP excessive, so I typically shy away from writing it after my name.

Any thoughts on this? 

 

Edited by jfmDNP

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J_W has 27 years experience as a DNP, APRN, CNS and specializes in Critical care.

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I know in Texas there are rules regarding displaying credentials for APRNs and RNs... So, some of the issue is state boards of nursing rules/regulations. In Texas the nurse is always held to the highest certification, so if a person is an APRN then they are held to that standard regardless of what role they are functioning in. In Texas the APRN must have APRN listed along with the type of APRN such as FNP, AGACNP, CNS, CRNA, CNM, PNP, NNP...It would be Jane Doe, DNP, APRN, FNP or John Doe, MSN, APRN, AGACNP

I do agree it would be nice to have a succinct title. Just not sure how it would work with the 4 APRN titles and then the different APRN recognition's that vary by state.  So the state rules/regulations are the issue.

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643 Posts; 11,093 Profile Views

The ANCC recommends that we all list the degree, licensure, state designation/requirement, national certification, awards and honors, etc., (in that order) after our names. That's probably why people do it. I also imagine it is because people are proud of all the different things that they've done and accomplished and want to show it off, which is fine. I know that nurses encourage other nurses to do that. Case in point: Margaret Fitzgerald wrote an article about how to list NP credentials and the intro paragraph (not written by her), states, "Dr. Fitzgerald offers advice on how and when you should show off your full set of hard-earned, well-deserved professional credentials that follow your name."

Personally, I assume that if someone is an NP that they have their master's so the MSN part is not needed. Also, I'm automatically an RN because I'm an NP so I omit that as well. If someone is a CNS, then I understand why they'd want to include the RN but again, I believe that is already embedded into the CNS designation, but maybe they do it for non-RNs that don't know what a CNS is. For signatures, I just put NP after my name. For "official" stuff, I might say AGNP-C or NP-C and then my subspecialty certification and that's it. I'm all about keeping it short and simple. 

I live and work in California and am unaware of any "rules" of how I should write my credentials after my name. I doubt the credentialing police will hunt me down if I get it wrong.

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

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I agree that we should try to keep it simple when we can.   Most experts (including ANCC) recommend only listing the highest nursing degree, not all the lower ones leading up to it.   Hence, I only list my PhD and omit the MSN and the BSN.   I just list my highest nursing degree, my licence and my specialty certification.   Some people have multiple specialty certifications -- and I think it is appropriate to list them.   But not the technical skill ones, such as CPR.   Some people try to pad their signatures with as many things as they can think of.  That demeans the whole credentialing system.

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J_W has 27 years experience as a DNP, APRN, CNS and specializes in Critical care.

117 Posts; 3,670 Profile Views

The state of Texas updated the rule back in Feb of 2019, for APRNs as I was non compliant...when I read the rule for APRNs...having to put APRN behind their name. I emailed as I'm not always in that role, thus did I still need to put APRN behind my name or only when I was in that role...anyhow never got a direct answer, obviously the Board isn't going to be specific. Short answer was yes as that is the standard to which I am held, thus I put APRN an left off RN...then pit my CNS and CCRN aftet that. I'm not sure of other states  rules about APRN titles, but since each state is different whe it comes to APRN recognition I always tell people to also check with their state board of nursing too.

Edited by J_W

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2 Followers; 183 Posts; 3,757 Profile Views

I couldn't agree more OP. I sometimes chuckle at the laundry list of acronyms that all say the same thing. It's like "we get it, you're accomplished" 😆

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ArmaniX has 7 years experience as a MSN, APRN and specializes in Critical Care.

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I only list the important stuff.

Armani MSN CRNP AGACNP-BC Honor Roll Student (2nd grade). 

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jfmDNP has 11 years experience and specializes in Family Medicine.

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12 hours ago, ArmaniX said:

I only list the important stuff.

Armani MSN CRNP AGACNP-BC Honor Roll Student (2nd grade). 

I can always add my Summer cook off award, CBBQ-RN.

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jfmDNP has 11 years experience and specializes in Family Medicine.

12 Posts; 83 Profile Views

14 hours ago, ToFNPandBeyond said:

I couldn't agree more OP. I sometimes chuckle at the laundry list of acronyms that all say the same thing. It's like "we get it, you're accomplished" 😆

Yep. Aren't we taught in APA to be concise?

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umbdude has 3 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Psych/Mental Health.

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This is one of those "culture shock" for me when I switched career from finance to nursing. In finance, it is considered silly to put your degrees behind your name unless it's a PhD. Nobody ever puts "MBA, MS, BS" after the name (these degrees are dime a dozen). People do put certain certifications behind their names but only if they are considered prestigious (difficult to obtain with low pass rates).

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4 Followers; 37,655 Posts; 102,793 Profile Views

I'm qualified for LOL, Lil' Ol' Lady, for those who don't know.  Unfortunately, the credential polizei won't let me use the title because at my weight, I'm not very Lil'.  

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jfmDNP has 11 years experience and specializes in Family Medicine.

12 Posts; 83 Profile Views

4 hours ago, umbdude said:

This is one of those "culture shock" for me when I switched career from finance to nursing. In finance, it is considered silly to put your degrees behind your name unless it's a PhD. Nobody ever puts "MBA, MS, BS" after the name (these degrees are dime a dozen). People do put certain certifications behind their names but only if they are considered prestigious (difficult to obtain with low pass rates).

I think there's some historical context behind it. Perhaps it's due to a time when nurses were seen merely as the doctor's indispensable helper. Now, not so much. Nurses earning doctorates and highly regarded certifications and owning private practices running the show. 

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