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Advice on how to handle a situation at work.

Professionalism   (397 Views 9 Comments)
by PrettyNerd PrettyNerd (Member)

3,829 Visitors; 104 Posts

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Hi all nurses! 

I wanted to come on here to get some advice.

I'm an lpn working at a specialty clinic, first job since I graduated nursing school. I've been working here for almost a year. About a month or so ago I got written up for "not improving", not finishing my work, and for making mistakes that apparently some physicians complained about. This really came out of no where and caught me off guard. I have been working hard and trying to learn a lot since it is a specialty and not something we go into detail in nursing school. So I've been taking notes and asking questions when I need help, so I was confused when my manager brought this up. About a week later,  one of the physicians pulls me aside and tells me that management is working on letting me go. This started making sense in my head because prior to the write up, they took away a lot of my duties. Then when I asked about which mistakes I was making, when I got written up, they were not able to answer my question. I must also add there is another lpn working there who is very insecure and likes to speak badly about other people to physicians/manager, she likes to twist things that are not true. Management takes her word on whatever she says, without asking me first. She sees I need help, instead of helping, she goes and runs her mouth and makes me look bad. Basically,  they gave me a write up so it is easier to fire me. 

So I have 2 questions. Is there anywhere i can go or call regarding this matter? I've called a few places but cant do anything unless it is discrimination or retaliation. 

Second,  is it best for me to just quit before I get fired?

Hearing all the things they told me really hurt me, as I've always gotten positive feedback from other employers. It would honestly hurt me to hear that I'm getting fired.

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WhaleTails has 1 years experience.

1,447 Visitors; 141 Posts

Start job searching. Now. If you look for something new while you still at this job, you won't have to check that little box that asks if you've been fired, and you won't have to explain why you've suddenly departed from your first and only nursing job.

If this is your first job after graduation, you're going to need this experience on your resume. Is there anyone at the clinic that would be willing to give you a positive reference? Maybe the physician that gave you a heads-up? They seem to care about you.

 

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TriciaJ has 37 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

10 Followers; 33,504 Visitors; 3,222 Posts

While you are floating resumes, it may still be worth your while to try to salvage your current job, if you would rather not leave it.  Who is your supervisor?  Would it be at all productive to request a meeting with that person for specific feedback and a work plan?  If nothing else, it will make them more likely to give you a good reference if this job is truly a lost cause.

 

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WhaleTails has 1 years experience.

1,447 Visitors; 141 Posts

If the situation is not salvageable and you believe the firing is coming soon, you can also consider asking for a plan to transition out. Let them know that you understand the job may not be a good fit, and ask if they'll accept your two weeks notice in exchange for a good or neutral reference. You can offer to extend your notice period if they want you to stay on while they hire or train a new nurse.

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kp2016 has 20 years experience.

3,226 Visitors; 235 Posts

You should start applying for new jobs ASAP. It sounds like the physician who warned you that the practice plans to fire you was trying to help you avoid that outcome. I would ask that physician if they would be willing to give you a written reference. It seems to me if they agreed that you deserved to be fired they wouldn’t be warning you. 

I would probably go ahead and give my notice. Having no income is awful but being fired might be worse.

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kbrn2002 has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Geriatrics.

28,878 Visitors; 2,885 Posts

To answer your first question no, there really isn't anywhere you can go or anyone you can talk to to change this. Unless it's blatant discrimination and this situation isn't there's nothing to be done legally.

To answer your second question yes! Look for another job.  Sadly for whatever reason or maybe even no reason at all the writing's on the wall with this job. It's much easier to find a job when you already have a job so start looking now.  

Sorry this is happening but from the way you are describing things it does indeed sound like your days there are numbered.  Even if you are able to salvage the situation enough to stay employed  do you really want to stay there?  You'd always be wondering when the other shoe will drop.  I don't think I'd care to stay at a place with such poor job security.

Edited by kbrn2002

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Jory has 10 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNM.

1 Follower; 11,687 Visitors; 1,297 Posts

I can tell by your post you are very intelligent.  I seriously doubt after a year you are so inept you keep making mistakes that impact patient care or provider inconvenience.  

I think you answered your own question...there is a little bee in your office that is throwing you under the bus.  Some people are so miserable in their lives they are only happy when they make someone else miserable. 

When you gain experience, you become stronger.  Something similar happened to me as a new nurse...these "ghost" accusers that brought up vague situations, never a specific patient, incident, etc..everything was soooooo generalized.  I narrowed it down to two nurses that were big drinking buddies outside of work.  

One day I looked at my manager on the latest issue (a patient that I was 100% certain I had never touched from what little description I had received) and said FIRMLY, "I think I know a better way to handle this...let's set up a meeting between you, the accusing nurse, and the chart so we can go over this situation in detail.  Until that happens, I am always....always going to be on the short end of an accusation when the other person gets to hide behind a curtain.  This isn't fair to me, nor would it be to any nurse.  If I did something wrong....I'll take responsibility if the error was mine, take a write up, whatever...but this isn't right that I don't even know the patient nor the situation, and you keep calling me into your office like this.  If I am doing something wrong...unless I know EXACTLY what I supposedly did...I can't fix it."  

Then "poof", just like that....the complaint went away.  

 

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1,752 Visitors; 54 Posts

This doesn't sound like an office that you'll flourish in. Move on once you can find another job.

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Anagray has 17 years experience as a BSN and specializes in ER,med-surg, LTC, psych, dialysis.

6,422 Visitors; 333 Posts

I think I have an idea who your employer is because I work in “ specialty clinics “ also. 

This particular employer fostered the culture of punitive measures against nurses for decades. When employees do not finish work and make mistakes, it is largely a reflection of inefficient management. As soon as you started having problems, it was your boss’ obligation to begin mentoring you to help improve the situation in your work area. Of course, instead you were blamed for all the problems. 

If I am correct in my assumption on who your employer is, your best move would be to find another area with a better manager, who knows how to empower his or her staff.

you can certainly file a complaint with HR, but you can’t fight the machine of corruption alone.

I am so sorry for what you are going through!  

Please know that you are a valuable member of our profession and don’t let one *** manager discourage you from practicing and retaining your professional self esteem.  

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