Working in a small practice, and the employees are rude. - page 2

Have been working in a small mom and pop practice for about a year now -- no EMR -- all on paper. Doc is old school. Very busy and well loved practice with a large patient volume. I started there a... Read More

  1. by   cayenne06
    Its almost always better to address these things directly, and in the moment, even if it makes you cringe. Be respectful, clear and consistent with your expectations from day one. The longer you put it off, the more awkward it gets.

    However, since you've let this become such a long term dynamic, I'd try to meet her where she is at, rather than just tell her my expectactions. The goal now is to repair the relationship and set new expectations. Corner her in the hall before lunch, say something like "Listen I am really unhappy with our relationship here at work. I am sorry I haven't said anything about it before. Can I buy you a cup of coffee during lunch so we can talk?" And DON'T unload a years worth of grievances on her- let it all go before you even try and talk to her about this. Its water under the bridge- the point is to try to start fresh.

    It is *not* easy to learn how to confront these situations head on, especially if you are not used to being in a supervisory role. But it is a skill you will need to use consistently throughout your career. If you have a good manager, reach out to her and ask her for help navigating the situation. And if you can't resolve it directly, then it's time to bring her in.
  2. by   WestCoastSunRN
    Quote from cayenne06
    Its almost always better to address these things directly, and in the moment, even if it makes you cringe. Be respectful, clear and consistent with your expectations from day one. The longer you put it off, the more awkward it gets.

    However, since you've let this become such a long term dynamic, I'd try to meet her where she is at, rather than just tell her my expectactions. The goal now is to repair the relationship and set new expectations. Corner her in the hall before lunch, say something like "Listen I am really unhappy with our relationship here at work. I am sorry I haven't said anything about it before. Can I buy you a cup of coffee during lunch so we can talk?" And DON'T unload a years worth of grievances on her- let it all go before you even try and talk to her about this. Its water under the bridge- the point is to try to start fresh.

    It is *not* easy to learn how to confront these situations head on, especially if you are not used to being in a supervisory role. But it is a skill you will need to use consistently throughout your career. If you have a good manager, reach out to her and ask her for help navigating the situation. And if you can't resolve it directly, then it's time to bring her in.
    This exactly.
  3. by   GoodNP
    Some a-hole people will treat you the way you allow them to.

    This may not be good advice, I'm just telling how I might handle it:

    Have a very low tolerance. If you ask her to do something, see that she does it even if she doesn't want to. You may explain yourself at times, but not all the time. Be very matter of fact with her and carry yourself with an air of authority and confidence. Remember the direction that delegation flows: from you to her, never the other way around. Do not concern yourself with whether she likes or approves of you. Give it a few months and things may change (some people only show respect when you treat them this way). Then, go to your employer and find out "do I report to her?". Of course they will say no, and hopefully get the point and do something about it. If not, you are clearly not going to receive the respect you have earned and it may time to move on as those before you have.
  4. by   ehcaseyAPRN
    Sound of Music- on the whole it sounds like you are in a good practice setting despite some garden variety issues and that one staff member in particular is causing a problem.

    I do have some questions; they don't necessarily need to be answered here but they bear thinking about.

    First, you say you've been in this job for a bit over a year. What does your employment history look like? Do you tend to stay in jobs for the long haul or do you change jobs on a regular basis? Is this your first NP/PA job?

    Second, are the MAs assigned to individual providers or do they do tasks on a first-come, first-serve basis? (For example, any available MA checks in patients as they arrive and takes care of other tasks on a first-available basis?)

    Third, are the other MAs and staff easy to work with? Is it just the one who is causing a problem? Is she rude to just you or to everyone? Is she always abrasive or was it mainly that one incident? Aside from her being abrasive, what kind of job does she do? Does she get the things done that need doing? How does she get along with the patients?

    There's always gotta be that one difficult person. Don't let that one person stop you from enjoying what otherwise seems to be a good position. Perhaps having a sit-down with the practice manager and the MA in question will help sort things out. She may truly be clueless that she's out of line. Good luck!
  5. by   AnnieNP
    Update?? What happened?

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