Gave up DNP - page 2

Im an NP for almost a year. I got accepted into a DNP program right after school and I decided to defer it for a year--and I realize I am still not ready to go back to school and I am not really sure... Read More

  1. by   wayemika
    Quote from offlabel
    APRN for 23 years, but I am involved in clinical instruction. I'm able to lecture at the university level with my MS, but not run a program. Certainly no need to have a DNP for clinical practice. Can't see myself ever doing it.
    I just dont have it in me to do more school after this. Im planning on working another 30 years but i still know NPs working out patient with just certificates and no BSN or MSN so im thinking we might be ok?
  2. by   wayemika
    Quote from offlabel
    APRN for 23 years, but I am involved in clinical instruction. I'm able to lecture at the university level with my MS, but not run a program. Certainly no need to have a DNP for clinical practice. Can't see myself ever doing it.
    Someone told me the MSN programs went away but enrollment numbers went down so they brought them back. I cant wait to see what the final DNP product is that they want us all to take?
  3. by   Jules A
    Quote from wayemika
    I just dont have it in me to do more school after this. Im planning on working another 30 years but i still know NPs working out patient with just certificates and no BSN or MSN so im thinking we might be ok?
    The general job site ads around here are starting to specify doctorate although I'm not sure they really know what they are asking for. I don't see a major problem getting some type of work or being able to open your own business however the issues for me include my need for a high rate and concerns of not being competitive. In my area everyone is now graduating with their DNP and despite being 16 years old and having no nursing experience they seem to think they are superior to the MSNs. I have zero interest in having an employer discount my vast experience in this specialty because I can't pretend I'm a doctor. The "Dr." thing and the cheaper rate many are willing to work for now were the reasons I took a second look at the DNP. It sure wasn't because I thought it would benefit my practice or result in a higher rate.

    I suspect MSN NPs will eventually be like the LPN and ADN and start getting squeezed out in a big way. Its unfortunate because if I had to blind pick I'd take a seasoned LPN or ADN over a new BSN any day.
  4. by   wayemika
    Quote from Jules A
    The general job site ads around here are starting to specify doctorate although I'm not sure they really know what they are asking for. I don't see a major problem getting some type of work or being able to open your own business however the issues for me include my need for a high rate and concerns of not being competitive. In my area everyone is now graduating with their DNP and despite being 16 years old and having no nursing experience they seem to think they are superior to the MSNs. I have zero interest in having an employer discount my vast experience in this specialty because I can't pretend I'm a doctor. The "Dr." thing and the cheaper rate many are willing to work for now were the reasons I took a second look at the DNP. It sure wasn't because I thought it would benefit my practice or result in a higher rate.

    I suspect MSN NPs will eventually be like the LPN and ADN and start getting squeezed out in a big way. Its unfortunate because if I had to blind pick I'd take a seasoned LPN or ADN over a new BSN any day.
    The good thing is if you work outpatient this will be less of a issue. in the hospitals i could see it becoming a problem. PAs only have a Masters and its good enough for them
  5. by   Jules A
    Quote from wayemika
    The good thing is if you work outpatient this will be less of a issue. in the hospitals i could see it becoming a problem. PAs only have a Masters and its good enough for them
    I agree for outpatient it will be less of an issue in the near future. Even after the decades of hullabaloo LPNs are still working however they have very few job opportunities. Since you are young there is plenty of time so I recommend keeping the DNP or PhD on your radar because as numbers of NPs increase the competition will increase in all settings.
  6. by   Oldmahubbard
    Concerning the old NPs from 30 years ago with just an ADN and a certificate, who were grandfathered in, and there still are a few- I hope they are settled in a job and very near retirement. It would be nearly impossible to compete for a job now with those credentials, although they are still legal.
  7. by   DalekRN
    This thread sounds a whole lot like the ASN nurses fussing about having to get their BSN.
  8. by   Oldmahubbard
    Quote from DalekRN
    This thread sounds a whole lot like the ASN nurses fussing about having to get their BSN.
    Yep. It's just a question of time for both.
  9. by   ehcaseyAPRN
    I'm up in the air about going back for my DNP. I have my MSN (2004) and at this moment do not have a true need for it. The only way NOT having it could be an issue would be if I allowed my Florida NP license and/or my AANP certification to expire AND if the DNP were a requirement to get them reactivated. As long as everything remains current and is renewed in a timely manner it won't BE an issue.

    For me there are really not any compelling reasons to put out the effort. It would be more of an ego booster, and I am comfortable enough in my own skin not to need the boost in a game I have no interest in playing. In addition, it would involve adding more debt to what I already have and would take a lot of time and energy.

    Who knows, something might change to make me want it but I'd say don't do it unless you just want to.
  10. by   EmpoweredNP
    I am a DNP student and very interested in research and transformational leadership in addition to patient care. Unfortunately the program does not provide any additional clinical practice education (ie. pharmacology, health assessment, etc) but it provides the education on how to identify a health care problem, perform an exhaustive literature review, analysis and summary of the evidence, and translating it to practice, and evaluating that change to ensure sustainability. It is a very prescriptive program and I've seen some people do this kind of work without a doctorate in hospitals. There are pros and cons. I think terminal degrees will be required of all nurses in the next 30-50 years. Right now, in NY state, ASN is being phased out and some hospitals are not hiring any RNs with associates degrees. If employees that are already hired only with ASNs, they are being forced to go back to school and get their BSN within 3 years or they will be terminated. I think that will happen with terminal degrees, it's already happening with the switch of BSN--DNP programs (completely surpassing the masters degree). That is why I am going back to school for my DNP and so happy that I will never be required to go back to school at a later age because of this. The education and knowledge learned in a doctorate program (DNP or PhD) is excellent and can never be taken away from you. It is helpful when your employer financially supports you as well. Some hospitals might require a letter of intent to the CNO as a doctorate might not be always covered in the reimbursement policy. Hope this helps

    P.S. I plan on staying in patient care after my DNP. I also would like to be an adjunct professor which most universities require a doctorate level degree now.
    Last edit by EmpoweredNP on Aug 19 : Reason: added the P.S.
  11. by   Oldmahubbard
    I just can't imagine still being in debt for my MSN, which I am not, and then going to get another bullcrap "doctoral " degree, that I would be truly embarrassed and ashamed to even use the stupid title.

    I am old enough that it won't apply to me. I feel sorry for 40 y/o NP's forced into the nonsense.

    Let's increase the quantity, and not the quality of NP education.

    Sheer bullcrap.
  12. by   OllieW
    Quote from Oldmahubbard
    I just can't imagine still being in debt for my MSN, which I am not, and then going to get another bullcrap "doctoral " degree, that I would be truly embarrassed and ashamed to even use the stupid title.

    I am old enough that it won't apply to me. I feel sorry for 40 y/o NP's forced into the nonsense.

    Let's increase the quantity, and not the quality of NP education.

    Sheer bullcrap.
    I do not understand why the bitterness towards the terminal degree. If you do not want to advance your education, then don't. I do not get the bitterness. I do not see DNP nurses downgrade the MSN only nurses.
  13. by   djmatte
    Quote from OllieW
    I do not understand why the bitterness towards the terminal degree. If you do not want to advance your education, then don't. I do not get the bitterness. I do not see DNP nurses downgrade the MSN only nurses.
    Not about being bitter. But the reality is the degree forces prospective NPs to shell out more money for letters that neither increases their expertise, nor more adequately prepares them for clinical practice.

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