ADN vs BSN Battle

Posted

Let me start by saying this is a vent post so if you are not interested in an opinion based post please skip over.

I am currently about to graduate from an ADN program in December. I have worked super hard to get into my program, worked hard throughout my program learning all the same stuff as BSN nursing programs, and just recently took the same Hurst review for the same NCLEX program as BSN students. With that being said, I see so much "title throwing" on this site. By that I mean there are so many posts almost belittling ADN nurses and they are a bit discouraging.

Don't get me wrong I 100% understand it will be more difficult to find a job however here in the DFW where I am at, 2 major hospital groups have partnerships with ADN programs meaning they are still hiring ADN nurses. If anything, and again I mean no disrespect but I hear better things from floor nurses during clinical rotations about our program than some of the major BSN programs in our area.

I guess my frustration comes into play when it seems as though at the point I am in now in terms of getting close to application time there is no support for others. Rather if you read this site and you are an ADN nurse you may feel as though you wasted your time getting a degree. I definetely need a job ASAP but I am not going to belittle those who I feel over paid for their education at which once the "new nurse" title is gone it really doesn't matter where you went to school so long as you have a valid RN license.

Hmm, just feeling a bit discouraged I guess. At any rate, just thought I would share my silly rant. :) Hope everyone is having a great day!

Edited by Joe V

direw0lf

direw0lf, BSN

Has 4 years experience. 1,069 Posts

Hey. I have actually seen and feel the opposite on nursing groups and forums! (warning: opinion forthcoming!) I feel like many ADN students feel and have stated that BSN is a waste of time. Especially since you can skip BSN and go to an ADN to masters in RN. So on one hand, I feel like I wasted time and money. On the other hand, I'm glad I went to a 4 year school because I got to explore other academic areas and really improved in my writing and I feel like the general ed classes I needed, like ethics for ex, will help me in nursing. I also like experiencing the whole 4 year college thing.

So I guess both ADN and BSNers feel there are pros and cons. I don't look down on anyone if they chose different than me. As for my own path there's no point in regretting or being discouraged by the decisions I made now, same for you imo :)

Mommy_RN1211

Mommy_RN1211

236 Posts

Thanks for sharing direw0lf. I definetely can see how you as well can feel that way. I guess its just tough for us all feeling the pressure of starting the application process.

NurseGirl525, ASN, RN

Specializes in ICU. 3,663 Posts

Every one takes a different route. One is not better than the other. But you also have to realize that some people cling tightly to their views and it's not possible to change their mind. That is what I have found especially on this old debate.

The fact of the matter is, people need to do their research on the job market and what is getting hired in their area. My area still hires ADNs. Many places do. Some day I will have my BSN, as I like learning and it's a personal goal I set for myself. Not because I will never have a job without it. Sometimes, you have to take what people say with a grain of salt. Especially if you have done your research and know in your heart and mind that you are doing what is right for you. I'm a single mom that is 39 years old. For me and my family, this is what works for me. If I was 18 and just entering college, I would not go this route. I would get the BSN. When it comes down to it a BSN and ADN will both be a RN after they pass NCLEX.

Mommy_RN1211

Mommy_RN1211

236 Posts

I agree! This is absoultly what makes financial sense for me and what works for my family. I think everyone as a new grad is having issues getting a job but it doesn't mean we are not all well equipt for the job in my honest opinion.

I guess it comes down to what you value more. Would you rather flaunt a difficult and expensive 4 year degree or do you want to be able to flaunt the lesser associates degree but have 2 years of real world experience under your belt (considering you find a job. But a majority of my cohorts have been poached by the 3rd/4th semester of our program so I guess its just demographics and who you impress)

direw0lf

direw0lf, BSN

Has 4 years experience. 1,069 Posts

My state prefers hiring BSNs. As I was told by a nurse in CNA school: because it gives hospitals better status recognition as well as BSNs "appear more likely" to advance in specialty professions.

But I hear stories about an LPN right out of school landing a job in a hospital in pediatrics, and an NP being the only one in her class to get a job after a year.

Anyway..I hope to flaunt my RN one day, period!

16mm

16mm

357 Posts

Lol. I see more bashing on this site of BSNs more than anything. Especially for pursuing a more "difficult and expensive degree" when ADNs are "better prepared clinically" and blah blah blah. I don't see why anyone has to judge another's choice at all. We all take the same NCLEX right? What works for you works for you and be proud of it! Don't let anyone make you feel less than because of your choices. It's awesome your location is still actively hiring ADN nurses! I wish I could say the same for mine, but job listings in all the major hospital systems specifically request BSN degrees so I chose the BSN route as the best for my family and I and I am so glad I did. Also, since I was able to take all of my general eds at a community college, and I now go to an affordable state university my entire BSN degree costs virtually the same as an ADN + RN-BSN would. Not every BSN degree costs an astronomical amount of money and there are plenty of locations that are hiring ADNs on a daily basis. Research and staying informed is key. Congrats on your upcoming graduation!

johsonmichelle

johsonmichelle

527 Posts

I think people should learn to be secure with themselves and whatever title they carry. Th adn vs bsn argument has been around for a very long time. If its not adn vs bsn , then its rn ( both adn and bsn ) vs medical doctors and so on. When I graduate with my adn degree, I'm going to be very proud of myself and I will have the same pride when I graduate from the rn - bsn program. People are responsible for their own actions, no need to bash them.

Edited by johsonmichelle

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience. 8,427 Posts

Lol. I see more bashing on this site of BSNs more than anything. Especially for pursuing a more "difficult and expensive degree" when ADNs are "better prepared clinically" and blah blah blah. I don't see why anyone has to judge another's choice at all. We all take the same NCLEX right? What works for you works for you and be proud of it! Don't let anyone make you feel less than because of your choices. It's awesome your location is still actively hiring ADN nurses! I wish I could say the same for mine, but job listings in all the major hospital systems specifically request BSN degrees so I chose the BSN route as the best for my family and I and I am so glad I did. Also, since I was able to take all of my general eds at a community college, and I now go to an affordable state university my entire BSN degree costs virtually the same as an ADN + RN-BSN would. Not every BSN degree costs an astronomical amount of money and there are plenty of locations that are hiring ADNs on a daily basis. Research and staying informed is key. Congrats on your upcoming graduation!

This.

I choose the BSN for professional reasons; my plans to get a graduate degree, as well as I compared all the programs and in my mind, getting an ASN and spending four years for it didn't make sense for ME; fast forward I became a LPN prior to an RN and when faced with it again as an LPN, I chose a program that was for working individuals; the ADN programs in my area are days only, and I enjoyed my job, and I had an AA and used my credits and only paid for my nursing courses.

In my area there is a glut of nurses so I still had to do a lot of legwork to get a nursing position; I will say it benefitted me to get the BSN because I got a leadership position, and used the experience to get other nursing positions later; I currently work in a specialty that works for me-it took me taking advantage of the positions I had, soaking up the knowledge and doing what worked for me...there are so many nurses with experience, it will take working in another specialty before getting that coveted position; it just takes time, regardless of the degree.

AlphaM

AlphaM

516 Posts

I was fortunate, lucky really to land a position in leadership at a large academic center as an ADN, but I quickly realized that without an advanced degree I was very limited as far as upward mobility is concerned. So I decided to complete my BSN and later my MSN online. Now I have a six figure salary away from bedside (prefer this) that includes education and leadership. I'm now shopping for A good DNP program. Bottom line, you like bedside nursing and hospitals will hire you? Then that's great! If you have aspirations that include leaving bedside then go for BSN and beyond. One is not better than the other, the two are just different.

Mommy_RN1211

Mommy_RN1211

236 Posts

I love all the comments people have left. I agree with everyone. Thanks for sharing!